WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Thu - 23.10.2014


newsroom management

Sylvie Kauffmann, Editor-in-chief of Le Monde, France joined the World Editors Forum panel on the question how to break away from the "he said yesterday" journalism.

She pointed out a very difficult challenge of orchestrating the media's channels: "We brought the newsrooms together in one building to mutually support and complement each other." The first female editor of France's leading daily shares a fear that has been discussed frequently at the 17th World Editors Forum: "I am afraid, that not the journalism but the quality will disappear."

But Kauffmann puts much trust into the community, which partly dictates the news of tomorrow: "At the moment, the media has lost control of the news. But we are learning to handle the merge of different channels, and the social cloud can indeed enrich newspapers, even in an investigative way."

We are covering the 17th World Editors Forum on our Twitter feed @NewspaperWorld (#WEFHamburg) and the European Journalism Centre is live-streaming a selection of sessions.

Author

Malte Brenneisen

Date

2010-10-07 17:18

Raju Narisetti, the managing editor of the Washington Post presented his vision of the sustainable model of multimedia newsrooms at the 17th World Editors Forum in Hamburg, Germany. He believes that the future of newsrooms is undoubtedly digital, and that newspapers should aggregate quality news from external sources and integrate this for their traditional readers.

"We should not be gatekeepers, but gateopeners," Narisetti said. "When people come to our site they expect a certain quality of content. So the content we aggregate has to be good," he added.

However, Narisetti noted that the idea of making news pure online is "a little bit false". He reminded the audience of the still huge circulations of the daily newspapers in the US. Speaking about new online media organisations, Narisetti claimed that "they give people what they want, sometimes even more". According to him, this can lead to irresponsibility of online journalists and bloggers that traditional journalism can't afford. Narisetti called it "the low cost of making mistakes." Nevertheless, he pointed out that the importance of the web-projects is in engaging readers.

Narisetti believes in paid online content. "We didn't give away content at the Wall Street Journal [he worked there for some years] and I don't think we should." He hopes to change the fact that the Post's website is free "sooner rather than later."

Author

Kirill Artemenko

Date

2010-10-07 13:59

Giovanni di Lorenzo, Editor-in-Chief of weekly newspaper Die Zeit, Germany, believes in the future of newspaper, despite the current crisis. In his speech "Why I believe in Print," di Lorenzo emphasized the importance of economic sustainability to finance quality journalism - both in print and online.

And although he acknowledges that new media could be a possible source of income in the future, he stated: "As long as we do not make money out of online journalism, we have to concentrate on print." He challenged the prophets of a digital revolution and reminds the audience of the virtues of print journalism. "In times of crisis the readers demand for analysis and orientation". In his view, print caters for both. "Newspapers of the future are not the river but the shores" he says. They are providing guidance for the flow of information.

Nevertheless, di Lorenzo received the World Editors Forum's proclamation of the "The Tablet Year" as a new chance for journalistic work: "We need to understand the iPad as a promising device to monetarize high-quality journalism in the digital world - simply to keep this independent and unadjusted profession alive." But meanwhile, he questioned the progressive tone of some colleagues."When journalists declare the end of print in the newspapers and publishers promote the internet, I wonder about this pleasure to diminish their own profession."

Author

Malte Brenneisen

Date

2010-10-06 16:34

According to Editor and Publisher, the National Press Foundation is offering "what's billed as the first comprehensive program for journalists on Alzheimer's Disease."

The program will last for four days and, according to a National Press Foundation announcement, will feature experts on topics such as the most recent research for prevention, diagnosis and treatment and the "costs of care and lost productivity." Plus, the workshop will include the personal stress of care-giving.

The program will include discussion with lawmakers on Capitol Hill and fifteen fellowships will be given to "qualified print, broadcast and online journalists," states the article.

The workshop will also deal with "steps families need to take before it's too late," according to NFP. There will also be sessions to help digital and broadcast journalists "find, modify and use the graphics that will grab an audience for this complex story."

After completing the online application, a journalist needs to submit a letter of support from a supervisor as well as two work samples. Applications must be sent in by 5 p.m. Eastern time on October 18.

Author

Heather Holm

Date

2010-10-04 17:53

According to the Guardian, the prime minister's media adviser, Andy Coulson, "personally listened to the intercepted voicemail messages of public figures when he edited the News of the World, a senior journalist who worked alongside him has said." The scandal, which emerged last summer, involved employees at News of the World allegedly hacking into phones and listening to voicemails of public official.

Coulson denied knowing of any illegal activity going on by the journalists who worked for him. However, an unidentified former executive from the paper informed Channel Four Dispatches that "Coulson not only knew his reporters were using intercepted voicemail but was also personally involved," states the article.

Author

Heather Holm

Date

2010-10-04 14:23

According to the Billings Gazette, a couple has been running a newspaper from their own home with donated publishing equipment. The couple, Curtis and Bonnie Starr, publish the Phillips County News in Malta, Montana in the United States.

The couple used to drive 70 miles to Glasgow, Montana to have their newspaper printed and then return to Malta to get it out to readers, but, according to the article, last Wednesday something happened.

A fire broke out in the Starrs' publishing building and the Starrs said "they had too much on their minds to worry about rushing that story into print," states the Billings Gazette. "When it's your own building burning, you're not quite so concerned about getting it in the paper right away," Curtis Starr said as quoted in the article.

The Starrs bought the Phillips County News in 1985 and the building a few years later. Four other businesses share the building as well and were affected by the fire. The Starrs lost all the computers, print and some older printing material as well as office supplies they sold "in the front of their business."

Author

Heather Holm

Date

2010-10-01 16:23

The Daily Mail has kept its place of gaining the most online readers, according to a recent study. The Daily Mail has "attracted the highest number of unique users in August, according to the latest Audit Bureau of Circulations Electronic (ABCe) report for the UK's national newspaper websites," according to journalism.co.uk.

The Mail's online readership has grown with "a month-on-month increase in unique user/browsers of 2.99 per cent to 45, 539, 202 for the month."

The Guardian and the Telegraph also had higher monthly user figures. Guardian.co.uk had a 1.09 month-on-month increase to 34, 967, 742 readers and Telegraph.co.uk had 32, 346, 325 readers, a 1.87 percent rise from July.

Author

Heather Holm

Date

2010-09-30 14:33

The Financial Times has recently relaunched its weekend magazine with a new look and new content, it was reported today. While, according to the Guardian, Saturday editions have been growing and exceeding weekday circulation at most publications, the FT's weekend sales are thought to be weaker than those Monday to Friday.

The paper does not actually reveal precise figures for its weekend paper, which is published on Saturdays but remains in shops the following day, said the article. But only 35 percent of readers who buy the Financial Times during the week buy the Saturday edition, said Caroline Daniel, the newly appointed editor of the Financial Time's weekend edition.

"Daniel wants to increase sales by encouraging more of the paper's star writers to appear in the Saturday edition," said the Guardian, since she does not think there is enough "cross-marketing" between the two. She oversaw the relaunch.

Daniel said the magazine's relaunch is the first of many changes to be made to FT Weekend. Much content will be printed in the main newspaper abroad.

Author

Heather Holm

Date

2010-09-27 13:35

According to the Greenslade Blog in The Guardian, journalists who work for the Miami Herald are not happy with the newspaper's "promiscuous use of tweets in its print edition stories."

So far, 23 staff members have signed a complaint and put it on the newsroom's memo board about others over-use and mis-use of Twitter.

For example, last month, there was a story about a 15-year-old girl and her mother, who were killed by the daughter's older boyfriend. The story included a quote from Twitter, which said, "there was absolutely nothing good that could have possibly come from this relationship."

The comment was added at the suggestion of an editor to show the story was gaining online interest. However, Greenslade said "including the quote in the final story meant leaving out quotes from people who were close to the tragedy."

Author

Heather Holm

Date

2010-09-21 17:56

According to a Poynter article entitled "10 Ways Journalism Around the World Is Being Revived and Reinvented," journalists should not be mourning the loss of newspapers and older journalistic styles, but should be finding new ways for journalism to emerge.

Bill Mitchell, author of the Poynter article, also has a larger essay in a report called "Brave New Worlds: Navigating the New Media Landscape," which is a set of 42 essays that was published last week.
A link to the report can be found here.

News executives, leaders of nonprofits, digital thought leaders and educators from over 20 countries throughout the world wrote the essays in the report. "None of them argue that journalism's transition from print to digital will be smooth," Mitchell wrote.

The 10 different things journalists can do to ease the transition, according to Mitchell, however, are process, partner, link, engage, innovate, be independent, trust, investigate, train and sustain.

Processed:

Author

Heather Holm

Date

2010-09-21 13:24

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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