WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Tue - 23.01.2018


Newspaper

Text: 

It is a truth universally lamented in the news industry, but no one can deny the fact that sales of printed newspapers are declining, with digital formats moving in to fill the space. If the younger generation, like their parents, begin reading news from online sources, where does that leave the future of print?

As inma.org reported, one Austrian newspaper, Kleine Zeitung, has seen this forthcoming challenge and launched a pre-emptive strike: they have launched Kleine Kinderzeitung, a newspaper specifically designed for children.

There are already some very successful models for engaging children in current affairs and news in general. Take for instance the long-running BBC institution that is Newsround. The program was first broadcast in 1972, initially known as 'John Craven's Newsround', after its longstanding presenter and editor, the show continues to be aired today.

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
23881
WEF URL: 
newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/07/newspapers_for_kids.php

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-07-27 13:40

Text: 

According to the Billings Gazette, a couple has been running a newspaper from their own home with donated publishing equipment. The couple, Curtis and Bonnie Starr, publish the Phillips County News in Malta, Montana in the United States.

The couple used to drive 70 miles to Glasgow, Montana to have their newspaper printed and then return to Malta to get it out to readers, but, according to the article, last Wednesday something happened.

A fire broke out in the Starrs' publishing building and the Starrs said "they had too much on their minds to worry about rushing that story into print," states the Billings Gazette. "When it's your own building burning, you're not quite so concerned about getting it in the paper right away," Curtis Starr said as quoted in the article.

The Starrs bought the Phillips County News in 1985 and the building a few years later. Four other businesses share the building as well and were affected by the fire. The Starrs lost all the computers, print and some older printing material as well as office supplies they sold "in the front of their business."

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
22310
WEF URL: 
newsrooms_and_journalism/2010/10/newspaper_stays_afloat_after_fire.php

Author

Heather Holm

Date

2010-10-01 16:23

Text: 

Regional publisher Archant is to stop circulation of both its free weekly papers, The Harlow Herald and The East Herts Herald, Press Gazette reports. The announcement comes with a twist, as Archant announced its plans to publish a weekly news magazine called Scene. The new publication will come with its own website and mobile application. The Guardian adds that Scene will also provide something needed in the journalism industry: more job opportunities.

Both of the free news weeklies had been suffering for some time. The Harlow Herald reported a circulation of 36,227 papers in the first six months of 2010, down 2.1% year-on-year. The East Herts Herald year-on-year statistics dropped more dramatically at 30.3%, circulating only 29,109. Archant's total revenue had also declined by 0.9% in the same period.

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
22053
WEF URL: 
newspaper/2010/09/scene_newszine_will_replace_free_weekly.php

Author

Stefanie Chernow

Date

2010-09-03 18:03

Text: 

Albalad was launched in Mayotte as the first newspaper to be published on the island, reports Temoignages. The new endeavor will publish 5,000 copies of the Alband, which will consist of twenty-four pages of content that includes local and international news, sports, announcements, etc. The new paper will employes 50 staff members and will be published daily.

Albalad is owned by Al Waseet International, a branch organization of France du Groupe. Richard Vincent was named editor-in-chief of Mayotte's publication. Vincent comments how thrilled he is that AWI decided to publish the paper in Mayotte rather than develop the Albalad in France. "We wanted to provide a new product that was made for the people of Mayotte," Vincent asserts. Mayotte's first publication is very much a "for the people, by the people" newspaper.

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
22045
WEF URL: 
newspaper/2010/09/albalad_mayottes_new_and_only_publicatio.php

Author

Stefanie Chernow

Date

2010-09-03 14:37

Text: 

By now, it has become increasingly clear that 2010 is in fact, as the British weekly Economist put it, the year of the paywall. The Times of London and the Sunday Times are just weeks away from offering their online content for a fee and recently, the New York Times announced its finalized paywall plans and an official launch date.

This has prompted Vanity Fair.com's and Newser's, Michael Wolff, to wonder what will happen to the news world when most people no longer get their sources from established sources.

Wolff shies away from the economics of paid online content's viability and delves deep into the transformations that a drop in readership might bring for newspapers behind paywalls.
Paid Content has reported that the Times counts on losing "plenty" of readers when it launches its paywall in June, and the Sunday Times editor John Witherow has announced that he expects a drop-off of over 90 percent. Other estimates by Enders put the audience that is willing to pay as 2 to 5 percent of readers.

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
21325
WEF URL: 
newspaper/2010/05/newsers_wolff_with_paywall_times_and_nyt.php

Author

Maria Conde

Date

2010-05-21 17:06

Text: 

In the past, media mogul Rupert Murdoch has lambasted search engines and news aggregators on various occasions for making profits off of content they did not produce. At a lecture to celebrate copyright's 300th birthday at the University College London yesterday, Murdoch's son and News Corp EMEA CEO, James Murdoch joined in his father's footsteps and criticized search engines for not making any contributions to newsgathering.

"Search companies and aggregators skim content from a thousand sources, sell it to clients, scoop up advertising revenues and put little or nothing back into professional newsgathering."

Paid Content reports that Murdoch criticized the long-standing status quo that most content online "wants to be free," adding that this imbalance between search engines and aggregators needs to be redressed.
"I believe that if there is an imbalance between the providers of creativity and those who exploit it, then we should care about it, and do something about it. Not in the interests of a particular company or sector. It is the public whose interest we need to serve - both people now, and future generations..."

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
21323
WEF URL: 
newspaper/2010/05/james_murdoch_criticizes_search_engines.php

Author

Maria Conde

Date

2010-05-21 14:40

Text: 

The Indian English language daily, Hindustan Times, has just launched an iPhone news app, and claims to be the first Indian newspaper to do so, reported afaqs!

While the number of iPhone users in India does not represent a substantial number, the application "will primarily target iPhone users or non-resident Indians in the West."

The app will be offered for free and without advertisements, but HT does hope it will be able to embed ads on the news app, monetizing the application in the future.

The application will feature five vertical sections - national, world, business, Bollywood, and cricket - and photos. An HT spokesporn told faqs! That they are considering opening the iPhone app to local content once it is launched, providing an additional way to monetize the content.

Hindustan Times has a large following in Northern India and is the country's second-most read English newspaper. In the past, it has partnered up with the Washington Post and Google to provide additional news coverage.

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
21300
WEF URL: 
multimedia/2010/05/india_hindustan_times_launches_free_ipho.php

Author

Maria Conde

Date

2010-05-18 18:50

Text: 

U.S. publishers have come under fire in a report on the state of the newspaper industry by the German Newspaper Publishers' Association, according to the New York Times.

The study draws some parallels between the two industries, but contrasts newspapers' plunging revenues in the U.S. with the relatively healthy German press.

The NYT explains that while fewer than half of Americans read newspapers, over 70 percent of Germans do. Daily newspaper circulation in the U.S. has dropped 27 percent from 1998 to 2008, but in Germany, circulation declined 19 percent.
The report blames some of the woes of the newspapers industry in the U.S. on the structure of the industry itself. The fact that newspapers are publicly traded companies allows for pressure from shareholders for profits to force newspapers to cut into editorial and production quality, a move that has sent readers and advertisers to the Internet. In Germany; however, newspaper are owned by families or owners with local roots.

The report criticizes American newspapers for offering their content on the Internet for free. German publishers have been much more apprehensive about putting their content online. Finally, the report concludes that newspapers in Germany need not fear the same fate of American publishers because the two industries are different.

But, is this conclusion too optimistic?

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
21298
WEF URL: 
newspaper/2010/05/german_publishers_offer_lessons_for_us_n.php

Author

Maria Conde

Date

2010-05-18 17:25

Syndicate content

Editors Weblog

The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


© 2015 WAN-IFRA - World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers

Footer Navigation