WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Sun - 21.01.2018


News of the World

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Jonathan Rees, co-founder of private detective firm Southern Investigations, has alleged that the News of the World hired his company in 1999 to spy on former Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police Lord Stevens, reports the Independent.

Meanwhile, a mole from Scotland Yard who was embedded in Southern Investigations at the time has alleged that the private detectives engaged in “a large amount of criminal activity on behalf of the News of the World,” according to the Telegraph.

Southern Investigations, based in London, is infamous for an unresolved murder case involving Rees’s co-founder being discovered in a London parking lot with an axe lodged in his head in 1987.

Rees told the website Independent Voices that the tabloid had hired his detectives to monitor Lord Stevens, allegedly in connection with rumours that the then-Deputy Commissioner (Lord Stevens served as Commissioner from 2000-2005) was misusing a police plane.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-09-18 16:59

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One year and one day after the News of the World published its last-ever issue, two British journalists were arrested on suspicion of alleged payments to public officials.

That is, two more British journalists; the Daily Star Sunday’s Deputy News Editor Tom Savage and the Sunday Mirror’s crime correspondent Justin Penrose brought the total number of journalists Scotland Yard had arrested in connection with phone hacking, computer misuse and corrupt payments to 34, reported the BBC.

Notably, Savage and Penrose were the second and third journalists to be arrested who had not been employed at publications owned by Rupert Murdoch’s News Corporation. A week prior, former Mirror employee Greig Box Turnbull had become the first.

These arrests, which took place on July 11, demonstrated the broadening scope of an investigation that began with the discovery of phone hacking at the News of the World, and has spread over the past year beyond voicemail interception and the Murdoch empire to all manners of misconduct in every corner of the British press and police force.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-07-25 18:29

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Glenn Mulcaire, the private investigator at the centre of the phone-hacking scandal that engulfed the News of the World last year, will be forced to reveal the name of the journalist who directed him to intercept phone messages. In a unanimous decision, five supreme court judges today ruled that Mulcaire must pass on information about how hacking targets were chosen and who his contacts at the paper were to the legal team representing Nicola Philips. Philips, a victim of phone-hacking was an assistant to publicist Max Clifford and is currently pursuing a claim for damages.

The decision puts an end to Mulcaire’s 20 month fight to avoid disclosing the potentially discriminating information. Mulcaire’s previous attempts to protect himself from requests to reveal details of his links with News of the World reporters had been ruled against by both the high court and the court of appeal. Mulcaire had attempted to invoke privilege against self-incrimination to avoid disclosing any details that "expose him to prosecution." When delivering today’s ruling Judge Lord Walker said: "The supreme court unanimously dismisses Mr Mulcaire's appeal. Section 72 of the [Senior Courts Act] excludes his privilege against self-incrimination: the proceedings brought by Ms Phillips are 'proceedings for … rights pertaining to …intellectual property' and the conspiracy proceedings to which Mr Mulcaire would expose himself on disclosure of the information amount to a 'related offence'."

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-04 18:43

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What separates a story that is in the public interest from one that is of interest to the public? As the investigations into the News International phone-hacking scandal continue, and may lead the prosecutions, this question is of fundamental importance.

The UK’s Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP) Keir Starmer has issued a series of guidelines advising prosecutors on what factors they should take into consideration when considering whether to change journalists or people they interact with for criminal acts that may have been committed in the course of reporting a story.

The interim guidelines list factors that may help prosecutors weigh up whether the public interest served by an action outweighs its “overall criminality”.

The DPP lists examples of behaviour which might serve the public interest, including:

- Behaviour that is capable of exposing a past, present or future criminal offence

- Behaviour that is capable of exposing the failure of a legal obligation

- Behaviour capable of uncovering miscarriage of justice

- Behaviour capable of “raising or contributing to an important matter of public debate”

- Behaviour capable of revealing that information relevant to any of the other categories is being deliberately covered up.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-18 18:22

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What do phone-hacking at the News of the World and Wikileaks have in common from an ethical point of view?

UNESCO's conference "The media world after Wikileaks and News of the World", held in Paris on 16 February addressed this question in its second panel debate about "Professionalism and Ethics in the New Media Environment".

Borja Bergareche, author of the book "Wikileaks confidencial" and London correspondent for the Spanish paper ABC, argued that the connection between the two is that they both involve distrust of the press.
Both cases raised issues about media and ethics and law and put journalistic standards in the spotlight: the News of the World scandal has led to intense scrutiny of journalistic practices, while Wikileaks raised questions about how journalists deal with a huge amount of information.

If there is one industry in which acting professionally has ethical implications, it's journalism, said Bergareche. When it comes to journalistic standards and to dealing with huge amounts of raw data and information, for example the US embassy cables, questions need to be asked about the nature of WikiLeaks.

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2012/02/journalistic_standards_and_media_regulat.php

Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2012-02-16 19:09

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There have been fresh revelations this weekend about the investigation into the News of The World phone-hacking enquiry and the influence of the Murdoch family within the British political elite.

Former prime minister Tony Blair, who will be the subject of much discussion as the anniversary of 9/11 approaches, will also have to confront speculations that his links to the Murdoch family were even closer than had been previously assumed.

Wendi Deng, Rupert Murdoch's wife, revealed in a forthcoming interview with Vogue magazine, that Tony Blair had been made godfather to Murdoch's 9-year-old daughter Grace. Blair is described in the article as "one of Murdoch's closest friends".

Ivan Lewis, the shadow culture secretary, has publically stated that his party was too close with the Murdoch's media empire and feels 'Labour would probably not support any deal that brought together the largest newspaper group (News Corp) with the largest broadcaster by turnover (BSkyB)'.

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/09/a_quick_phone-hacking_update.php

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-09-05 13:42

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After the drama that was Murdoch's appearance in front of the Parliamentary Select Committee, the slow and steady unravelling of the phone hacking scandal had drifted to the peripheries of media once again, but now seems to be returning to prominence.

The story seems to continuously deepen in complexity, although The Guardian's handy flow chart, which explains the long string of events which have lead to the current situation, is a great help in making sense of the situation.

It now appears that a potentially damning new piece of evidence has appeared.

A letter written by The News of the World's former royal correspondent Clive Goodman in 2007, after he was released from a 4 month prison sentence for phone hacking, has been released, with some redactions. It further implicates Andy Coulson and other senior NoW staff in the scandal, asserting that Coulson and others had knowledge of the hacking.

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Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-08-16 18:57

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The phrase "I don't have direct knowledge" has been thrown around often in today's Parliament hearings with Rupert and James Murdoch.

In the conference, British lawmakers grilled the Murdochs on financial details of settlements, facts about earlier phone hacking cases, political influence, and who exactly was responsible for the illegal phone hacking. Rupert Murdoch prefaced the questions with the statement, "This is the humblest day of my life."

He then distanced himself from responsibility, saying that News of the World represented just one percent of his company and that he was not told by editors about large payments to settle phone hacking cases out of court. His answers were slow and he appeared to have trouble remembering details. His son, James, kept trying to jump in and answer questions, but one Parliament member kept redirecting corporate responsibility questions back to Murdoch senior.

When asked, Rupert Murdoch said that he was "not really in touch". He claimed to talk to his senior editors about once a week, but later revised the answer to once a month. According to him, the conversations remained informal, opening with his question, "What's doing?" and stayed on topics of news stories. He insisted that he did not influence the stories. He later revised his account again, saying that he would not normally pay that much attention to British newspapers that make up just 1 percent of his business.

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newspaper/2011/07/the_parliament_hearings_the_humblest_day.php

Author

Florence Pichon

Date

2011-07-19 19:16

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As the toll of casualties from The News of the World scandal increases, the race is on for other publications, owned by various subsidiaries of the Murdoch media empire, to distance or rebrand themselves so as not to find themselves caught in the line of fire.

Over the weekend yet more senior figures, from the worlds of journalism, politics and policing have been further embroiled in the scandal and have paid the price. Former head of News International Rebekah Brooks (who resigned from her post last week) was arrested and later released while Metropolitan Police Commissioner Sir Paul Stephenson has resigned along with Les Hinton, C.E.O. of Dow Jones, who testified in British Parliamentary Inquiries in 2007 and 2009 attesting that phone hacking was the fault of one single reporter and not symptomatic of wider company policy.

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Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-07-18 16:38

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With News of the World gone, there is plenty of room for competition to swoop in on tabloid readers. It's three main competitors, The Sunday Mirror, The Daily Star, and The People (as well as a few other publications) stand to profit.

According to The Guardian, the Daily Star Sunday is planning to do just that. Last Sunday, it saw sales jump up by nearly a quarter as readers rushed to get more news on the NoW phone hacking scandal. The Star added a badge to the front cover, cheekily proclaiming, "Change up to the Daily Star Sunday, a paper you can trust!" This Sunday, it will be doubling the print run in anticipation of reader interest.

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Author

Florence Pichon

Date

2011-07-13 18:40

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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