WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Thu - 27.11.2014


News Corp

In the midst of News Corporation's shelving of its 'Project Alesia' due to over running costs, Rupert Murdoch showed support for the British government's rigorous spending cuts as well as defended independent professional journalism and free market economics, PressGazette.co.uk reports.

According to Press Gazette, Murdoch's speech comes in light of heavy opposition from the BBC and rival publications who fear that News Corp's possible control over the remaining 61 percent of BSkyB that it doesn't already own, will make the company "too big and powerful in the UK."

But Murdoch stressed that journalism needs to stay perseverant, independent and "hard-driving" in order to expand and cater to the new world of modern mass communication. He emphasized the idea that no matter how prominent digital media becomes, there will always be the need for credible sources and "a professional seeking to uncover facts no matter how uncomfortable."

Author

Grace Donoso

Date

2010-10-25 17:11

Starbucks customers can have a little news with their coffee now. According to news.cnet.com, Starbucks is going to launched a "revamped Web hub, a landing page that's only accessible from its in-store Wi-Fi networks in the U.S. Teaming with the likes of Yahoo (the main technology partner), the Wall Street Journal, GOOD, the New York Times, iTunes, LinkedIn and Foursquare." With this new site, Starbucks has local and mainstream news, free music downloads and local information, like weather, bike trails and movie trailers.

Author

Heather Holm

Date

2010-10-21 15:28

Yet another paper is not letting users past its homepage without paying for content. The News of the World, following in the footsteps of fellow News International publications the Times and the Sunday Times, has a new paywall.

"With its phone hacking scandal continuing to dominate coverage of New Corp.'s mass-market UK Sunday tabloid, it's little surprise that the expected implementation of web charging went almost little-noticed when it actually happened on Wednesday," noted paidContent.

The new website costs £1 a day and £1.99 for four weeks. There is a free £2 credit when you first register, and an option to pay with a mobile device other than a debit or credit card. Subscribers also need to give their postal address to receive content. The site is handled by the same Times Plus platform which powers the Times and Sunday Times, paidContent reported.

Author

Heather Holm

Date

2010-10-14 14:29

Assistant editor for online Tom Whitwell and Director of Times Digital Gurtej Sandhu told participants at a lunch during the 17th World Editors Forum a few details about the progress of the Times of London's new paywall and the thinking behind it. Both were adamant that they could not as yet reveal any figures, but said that they were happy with the sign-ups that they had received so far and that numbers might be released in weeks or months.

The order to adopt the paywall came directly from Rupert Murdoch, CEO of News Corp, which owns the Times' parent company News International. Murdoch has been extremely vocal about the importance of implementing paid online content both for financial and principled reasons since spring 2009. But Whitwell explained that the thinking at the paper has suggested for some time that this could be the right move to take.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-10-12 19:00

"Storytelling has found its best new ally in liquid media" argued Alfredo Triviño, director of creative projects at News International. Tablets are a completely different device from websites, newspapers, magazines and books, and Triviño stressed that they have the ability to substitute them: "They offer a bigger choice and the beauty of different levels of engagement."

Tablets are offering customers a combination of entertainment and information, while trying to surprise them. Triviño summarized the tablet experience as unique: "it is about playing, buying and organizing, not only reading".

Work on a new tablet device began three years ago and it is in an ongoing process. According to Triviño, its success relies on envisioning what is next looking at the expectation of the customers while understanding the technological boundaries. "Loading time is critical", for example, he said.

We are covering the 17th World Editors Forum on our Twitter feed @NewspaperWorld (#WEFHamburg) and the European Journalism Centre is live-streaming a selection of sessions.

Author

Naiara Arteaga Taberna

Date

2010-10-07 18:01

Rupert Murdoch's News Corporation plans to launch a content-led, paid-for news content aggregation platform that promises to create new digital revenue streams for its core print titles and third-party publishers as well, MediaWeek.co.uk reported today. The news aggregation platform plans to launch before the end of 2010.

While the project, under development for a year, is not being named yet, its involves content aggregation from News International's core print titles: The Times, The Sunday Times, The Sun and News of the World, along with content from third party publishers.

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-10-07 13:08

According to the Guardian, the prime minister's media adviser, Andy Coulson, "personally listened to the intercepted voicemail messages of public figures when he edited the News of the World, a senior journalist who worked alongside him has said." The scandal, which emerged last summer, involved employees at News of the World allegedly hacking into phones and listening to voicemails of public official.

Coulson denied knowing of any illegal activity going on by the journalists who worked for him. However, an unidentified former executive from the paper informed Channel Four Dispatches that "Coulson not only knew his reporters were using intercepted voicemail but was also personally involved," states the article.

Author

Heather Holm

Date

2010-10-04 14:23

The News of the World will install a paywall next month, the Guardian reported. The paper will charge online viewers £1 for a day's access and £1.99 for a four-week subscription. News of the World plans to launch a paid iPad app in the near future, which will charge a separate fee of £1.19 per week. "News International is leading the industry by delivering on its commitment to develop new ways of making the business of news an economically exciting proposition," says Rebekah Brooks, chief executive of News International.

Author

Stefanie Chernow

Date

2010-09-16 14:53

Labour MPs plan to call for a parliamentary inquiry into the News of the World phone-hacking scandal and the Metropolitan police is considering reopening its investigation, the Guardian reported. The affair, which emerged last summer, has resurfaced following a New York Times article which once again claimed that hacking had been common at the Murdoch-owned paper and that Scotland Yard had restricted its investigations. Several Labour MPs have apparently been victims of phone hacking.

The MPs push for a new inquiry could be referred to the House of Commons standards and privileges committee. Assistant Metropolitan police commissioner John Yates said on BBC Radio 4's Today programme that detectives will consider whether there is enough new evidence to reopen the case. He specified that NOTW reporter Sean Hoare who was quoted in the NYT's piece as saying that hacking was widespread had not come up on police radar before.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-09-06 13:25

Last summer, the Guardian claimed that News Corp had paid out more than £1 million to settle cases involving illegal phone hacking by News of the World journalists, prompting further investigation into a scandal that had seen a NOTW reporter jailed two years previously. The story received limited media attention at the time, but now, the New York Times has published a long article detailing the allegations and criticizing Scotland Yard's limited efforts to pursue the case. The paper has had an investigative team at work on the story since March, according to the Guardian, and claims to have spoken to many former NOTW reporters and editors.

Scotland Yard's investigation allowed NOTW and its owner News Corp to insist that the hacking was limited to one employee, said the NYT, while in fact "interviews with more than a dozen former reporters and editors at News of the World present a different picture of the newsroom," where hacking and other improper tactics were common, including hiring private detectives. The one employee, tried and jailed in 2007, was royal reporter Clive Goodman who was working with private investigator Glenn Mulcaire.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-09-02 13:25

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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