WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Fri - 28.11.2014


New York Times

Starting at the end of this year, the Times will roll out new subscription plans at different price points. Two cheaper subscription models will be offered: One with topic-based packages, ranging from food to politics, and another that compiles the newspaper’s most important coverage.

The latter package was earlier referred to as “NYT Junior,” Jeff Bercovici of Forbes pointed out, aimed to target what Eliza Kern nicknamed “Generation Mooch.” CEO Mark Thompson said research has shown the market for this type of subscription is “hundreds of thousands,” Capital New York reported.

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-04-26 14:00

"We have to change the perception of the New York Times as not only a place to read about important stories of the day and interesting topics, but also a place to watch,” Denise Warren, executive vice president of NYT’s Digital Products and Services Group, told Journalism.co.uk.

Many of the Times’ videos were already available for free on YouTube and Hulu, an inconsistency that needed to be addressed, Warren told paidContent. And thanks to sponsorship by Acura and Microsoft, videos are now freely accessible on all of the Times’ platforms, including its mobile apps, according to a release.

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-04-24 15:19

“If you can’t stomach the gore, don’t run the photo. Period,” wrote Orange County Register Editor Charles Apple, who first brought attention to The Daily News’ photoshopping.

The Daily News declined to comment on its editorial decision, but the question of whether to publish graphic images is one many other editors confront.

FOR GORE

Some advocate for the publication of graphic photos, arguing that text can never show the true magnitude of a horror as visuals do.

“I think TV news distances and ‘shrink-wraps’ human suffering,” writes Zeynep Tufekci, a fellow at Princeton University’s Center for Information Technology Policy. “[A]nd I believe such mode of reporting is against the public interest.”

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-04-18 12:30

"This deal was years in the making," Founder and CEO Shafqat Islam told Business Insider. "And I think its a big statement that content marketing as a category has really evolved when large and mainstream publishers, and The New York Times is among the largest most reputable ones, are actually looking at software partners like NewsCred to help them figure out that space." 

Founded in 2008, NewsCred uses both algorithms and an editorial staff of 8 to aggregate content for clients including Pepsi and Toyota. While marketers comprise 50 percent of the company’s business, Islam told paidContent that the company’s mission focuses chiefly on publishers, including partners CNN, Al-Jazeera and The Guardian. Other news organizations are clients, such as The New York Daily News, which relies on NewsCred-licensed content to fill its South Asian section.

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-03-20 15:17

The paywall, set to take effect this summer, will allow each visitor 20 complementary page views per month, excluding the home page and classifieds section. The newspaper hopes to maintain most of its 17 million monthly unique visitors.

Such a metered model has proven successful for other newspapers including The New York Times, which Columbia Journalism Review said generates $100 million through digital subscriptions.

In addition to not counting clicks from search engines and social media, the paywall will allow unlimited access from schools, government and military workplaces, notable as more than 20 percent of District of Columbia residents are federal employees, according to Forbes. But Don Graham, chairman and CEO of The Washington Post Co., has previously noted that locals provide less than 10 percent of the newspaper’s online traffic. This statistic made him previously wary of charging for online access, as he predicted that bundling digital subscriptions with print wouldn’t be as successful for The Post as for other papers.

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-03-19 14:21

“It’s pretty shocking to see what’s become of the time-honored form since the newspaper industry’s great unraveling started a decade ago,” Starkman wrote.

The industry saw a steady rise of long-form contextual journalism from the 1950s to the early 2000s, according to a new report by Katherine Fink and Michael Schudson of Columbia University. But Starkman’s research suggests that such in-depth coverage might have peaked about a decade ago.

Starkman examined The L.A. Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times and reported that all but The New York Times saw steep declines in their long-form coverage. The Post’s 2,000 word stories dropped about 50 percent between 2003 and 2012, and The Journal’s fell 35 percent. These declines are even sharper for 3,000 word stories: The L.A. Times saw a 90 percent decrease and The Journal a 70 percent decrease.

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-03-15 16:57

Bill Keller, former executive editor of The New York Times wrote earlier this month about the importance of journalists being there when news happens. Risk-averse, cost-focused news organizations had begun their retreat from the world long ago, Keller wrote, lamenting that the truly committed foreign correspondent was something of an endangered species.

Sadly, in many areas, this issue goes far beyond a diminished corps of foreign correspondents.

The truly committed journalist, who is prepared to make personal sacrifices to tell the story despite economic, social and political obstacles, is in some societies also under threat. And how many publishers are still hiring and training and deploying journalists who are able to make their own calls on how close they get to risky situations?

So when exceptions arise, they are worth making a fuss about. Two Africans who understand the need to be there were in Zambia this week to share their newspaper experiences with participants on WAN-IFRA’s Women in News programme.

Author

Cherilyn Ireton's picture

Cherilyn Ireton

Date

2012-12-13 17:52

‘The N.Y. Times is the paper of record that published and stood behind the Pentagon Papers. Where are you now on the brutal prison treatment and studied legalities being visited on US Army Private Bradley Manning? […] It’s unconscionable and sad if The Times sits quietly by saying nothing.’

Author

Frederick Alliott's picture

Frederick Alliott

Date

2012-12-06 19:07

‘Post-truth politics’. The expression has an undeniable ring to it. Fusing a modish anti-politics sentiment with pleasingly Orwellian overtones, the phrase has come to symbolize the pessimism and contempt that has permeated much of the media commentary during the lead-up to today’s Presidential election. Orwell himself said that in times of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act; whether or not the 2012 campaign ought to be castigated as being especially mendacious, the central role of websites such as FactCheck and PolitiFact suggests an urge to scythe through the dense undergrowth of shrill partisanship in search of something that is empirically, verifiably, irreducibly ‘true’. 

Author

Frederick Alliott's picture

Frederick Alliott

Date

2012-11-06 18:54

On Monday, the day incoming New York Times CEO Mark Thompson was supposed to be welcomed with an awkward class photo at the newspaper’s headquarters, memo leaker extraordinaire Jim Romenesko published an email from the Newspaper Guild of New York’s ‘Mobilization Committee’ affirming that hundreds of The Times’ staffers had quietly pledged to “withhold their bylines, photo credits, and producing credits” (aka to hold a 'byline strike') and to “work strictly to the terms of the contract” if necessary.

This email came well over a year into contract negotiations between the Guild and The Times' management. It argued that the newspaper’s negotiators are seeking to implement “what amount to the most radical pay cuts for the New York Times staff in modern history” and spread the word on ways in which irate staffers could get their voices heard, the byline strike and working to contract ideas being two such suggestions. Its sender was Grant Glickson, Chairperson of The Times unit of the Newspaper Guild of New York.

“We don’t know yet if we will have to go down this road, but it is vital that we be prepared,” wrote Glickson.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-24 18:28

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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