WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Fri - 24.10.2014


neutrality

A new story has surfaced in the on-going debate about how far media needs to go in its quest for journalist neutrality.

Jim Romenesko reports on his blog that Kevin Corrado, president and publisher of the Green Bay Press-Gazette has harshly criticized 25 journalists working for Gannett Wisconsin Media for signing a political petition, advocating the recall of Wisconsin governor Scott Walker.

Corrado writes in a column for the Press-Gazette that disciplinary measures are being taken against the reporters who signed the petition, on the grounds that signing the petition has compromised their journalistic impartiality. He states that what they did was “wrong” and the company is considering providing all its journalists with additional ethics training.

Corrado writes, “the principle at stake is our belief that journalists must exercise caution and not cause doubts about their neutrality, especially at a time when the media is under a microscope and our credibility is routinely challenged.”

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-26 18:04

The free press; the backbone of every strong democracy and a concept that all journalists hold dear to their hearts. What makes the press free? Surely we all know the answer to that - a plurality of voices, the chance for everyone to have their say and above all, a dedication to uncovering the truth.

Well, here's the sticking point: not everyone seems to be able to agree on what the truth actually is. Opinion tends to get in the way. This is why the press aims to be neutral.

Many journalistic institutions stake their name on neutrality. For example the BBC, which is supported by public revenue obtained from the Television license fee, is fiercely neutral and it's coverage is regularly examined to make sure it stays that way. CNN, the American news network, has also founded its reputation on neutrality as the foundation of their journalistic ethic. This is great, right?

Jay Rosen recently penned a piece that pointed out how the 'CNN leaves it there' policy of absolute neutrality is not always a workable option. He dares to suggest that the equation 'neutrality=good' might not be as water-tight as most would imagine.

Is absolute neutrality always good for the press?

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-09-01 14:31

Author

Florence Pichon

Date

2011-07-06 18:58

A new, redesigned, re-engineered Twitter site has been launched, aiming to provide an "easier, faster and richer experience," according to the site's blog. The company has realized that although the 140-character constraint means that information is shared quickly and concisely, but that "life doesn't always fit into 140 characters or less."

The new design includes a cleaner timeline and offers more detail when you click on an individual Tweet, related to the author or subject: maybe other Tweets from them, or a map showing where it was sent from if geotagged. If you click on a username you can see a mini profile within the page, offering a bio and recent Tweets. There is also "infinite scroll," meaning that there is no more need to click "more" to view older Tweets. Twitter has partnered with YouTube, Vimeo, Flickr, TwitPic, TwitVid, USTREAM, Etsy and others to make it easier to view embedded photos and videos directly on the site. It has been possible for some time to link to photos on Twitter via TwitPic.com, for example, but these changes will allow social networkers to share photos as simply as they already do on platforms such as Facebook.

Changes will be rolled out to all users over the next few weeks.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-08-02 00:30

Guardian reports that in preparation for its June paywall, the Times, will be reducing its editorial budget by 10% and implementing a number of voluntary redundancies that could leave up to 50 journalists out of work.

In a lunchtime meeting at the Times last week, editor James Harding revealed that sister publication, the Sunday Times, would also be cutting its editorial budget by 10%, which could lead to the elimination of 30 jobs. The grand total of redundancies could reach 80. Staff at the Times have two weeks to apply for voluntary redundancies, this is the only News International publication to offer these, and those who decide to take the offer, would receive four weeks' salary for every year worked plus a four-month notice period.

The Sunday Times staff will also be hearing about the paper's cost saving plans soon, which could be cutting £4.5 million from the current editorial budget of £42.5 million a year, would go into effect on July 1st. It is estimated that The Times and the Sunday Times lose up to £240,000 per day. The company has blamed these losses on an advertising downturn.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-04-20 11:24

A word to the wise citizen journalist: Don't tell people you work for CNN unless you're salaried--they might sue you. [The Hollywood Reporter]

Scotland's iPhone users can rejoice--The Scotsman, an Edinburgh-based daily, has launched Scotland's first newspaper iPhone app. [Hold The Front Page]

Will Gordon Brown's stance against paywalls help him gain votes? [Newser]

The WSJ's three-year Pulitzer drought has Boston Phoenix writer Steven Kadzis wondering why. [The Phoenix]

Google's new Twitter timeline search can help reporters looking for messages tweeted on an important day in history. [V3.co.uk]

Author

Alexandra Jaffe

Date

2010-03-17 14:34

New York Times journalist Martin Fackler has written about the "failure" of the news media to press Japanese prosecutors for answers in an ongoing political scandal.

In March, Tokyo prosecutors arrested an aide to a prominent opposition political leader and sparked a damaging scandal which led to the resignation of Ichiro Ozawa, head of the opposition Democratic Party. Many Japanese have been vocal in their criticism of the prosecutors' actions, which appear politically motivated, but "you would not know that from the coverage by Japan's big newspapers and television networks," said Fackler.
He points out that what the media "mostly reported" was a "stream of anonymous allegations, some of them thinly veiled leaks from within the investigation, of illegal campaign donations from a construction company" to Ozawa. Despite "a rare outpouring of criticism" directed at the prosecutors, including accusations of political meddling and concerns about the arrest's timing. The Democratic Party's lead in the polls was eroded following the incident. It is a particularly "crucial moment" in Japan's democracy, reported Fackler, as the country's Liberal Democratic Party, which has dominated government for the past 50 years, could be defeated and subsequently replaced with more competitive two-party politics.

Author

Marion Geiger

Date

2009-04-30 16:45

As newspapers throughout the Western world contemplate closure, an online-only future or at the very least a new business model, in India the print news sector seems to be doing rather better.

Today there were three more optimistic stories about developments in the Indian press. Firstly, Hindustan, the Hindi daily from HT Media Ltd, launched its Allahabad edition on January 29. It is the paper's sixth edition in Uttar Pradesh, and Hindustan's head of business Amit Chopra said that the paper is targeting a circulation of 50,000 copies.
Indian newspaper Sakaal has announced a major expansion with the construction of a new printing plant and publishing house in Pune, western India. Sakaal is the leading Marathi (the fourth-most spoken language in India) newspaper from the Sakaal Group.

Lastly, a report by Exchange4Media.com focussed on the positive aspects of the economic slowdown for the press, claiming that it has "perhaps given the best opportunity to take corrective measures to cut the flab and improve efficiencies."

Source: Press Week, Exchange4Media.com

Author

John Burke

Date

2008-12-23 15:45

Journalist Dana Willhoit has just announced the launch of thepressreleasesite.com, a press release writing and distribution service.

The site is "staffed entirely by former newspaper reporters," according to a press release. No one is more suited to create a newsworthy press release than a newspaper reporter, Willhoit said.

A press release "molds brand identity," she continued, and if it is to be picked up by media outlets, must be crafted properly by keeping the intended audience in mind. Using both free and paid press release services gives their clients "visibility," the site claims, and provides "instant traffic."

Willhoit has also included resources to help those "on a tight budget" write and distribute their own press releases.

Source: Free Press Releases

Author

Lauren Drablier

Date

2008-11-21 13:57

Colin Myler, editor of the UK Sunday tabloid newspaper News of The World, says that "back door" privacy laws are restricting Britain's media. Myler put forward that smaller publishers are placed under undue pressure by the legislation, since they frequently do not have the budget to take legal action.

He added that the lack of parliamentary discussion about these issues was worrying. According to Myler, the edicts from High Courts in London are prompted by Human Rights judges from the European Union, who are "unfriendly" to freedom of expression, while the MPs remain silent.

Although the media may be partly responsible for the privacy situation, instructions imposed by Justice Eady, senior libel judge, and other prominent legal figures have left the UK media in an "unrecognisable" state.

Myler's paper was ordered to pay £60,000 in damages to world motorsport figure Max Mosley in July, AFP reported. Daily Mail editor Paul Dacre previously said that the "public shaming" of high-profile figures may be meaningful in "defending the parameters of what are considered acceptable standards of social behaviour."

"Some [newspapers] will struggle to survive, but, as an industry, we really do have to be more positive and not allow those so-called media experts and commentators to tell us how badly we are doing," Myler said.

Author

Lauren Drablier

Date

2008-11-13 12:56

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