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Tue - 23.01.2018


Murdoch

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Jonathan Rees, co-founder of private detective firm Southern Investigations, has alleged that the News of the World hired his company in 1999 to spy on former Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police Lord Stevens, reports the Independent.

Meanwhile, a mole from Scotland Yard who was embedded in Southern Investigations at the time has alleged that the private detectives engaged in “a large amount of criminal activity on behalf of the News of the World,” according to the Telegraph.

Southern Investigations, based in London, is infamous for an unresolved murder case involving Rees’s co-founder being discovered in a London parking lot with an axe lodged in his head in 1987.

Rees told the website Independent Voices that the tabloid had hired his detectives to monitor Lord Stevens, allegedly in connection with rumours that the then-Deputy Commissioner (Lord Stevens served as Commissioner from 2000-2005) was misusing a police plane.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-09-18 16:59

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Today the Leveson Inquiry has heard more revelations regarding the behaviour of the British tabloid press.

To summarise, witnesses today included Christopher Jefferies, who was falsely accused and vilified by the media as the killer of Joanna Yates; Ian Hurst, a former British army intelligence officer whose computers was allegedly hacked by the News of the World in order to obtain details of an IRA informer; Jane Winter, a peace and human rights campaigner in Ireland; Anne Diamond, a former television presenter; and Charlotte Church, a singer who was thrust into the limelight at a very young age. You can read coverage of the whole thing here.

Jeffries related that he felt as if he were under "house arrest" after his arrest by police and that he had to stay with numerous friends to avoid media scrutiny, feeling "rather as if I was a recusant priest at the time of the Reformation, going from safe house to safe house".

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Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-11-28 19:21

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Renowned journalists and media figures have been eager to voice their concerns for the future of journalism and to expound its importance while the police adopt a seemingly more hostile stance towards the media and News Corporation is beset by yet more allegations of wrong doing.

Defendants of investigative journalism have been speaking out, following what many regard as alarming attempts by the Metropolitan Police to invoke the official secrets act against The Guardian. The director General of the BBC Mark Thompson has voiced his concern for the future of the craft of investigative journalism in what he described as a "dangerous period" for the profession.

The cries to protect the freedom of journalists to investigate thoroughly risk being lost amid the overwhelming atmosphere of public reproach and resentment felt toward one particular journalistic organisation: News International.

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Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-09-26 15:53

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Is the U.K. Press Complaints Commission 'ineffective'? Well, that depends on what you think the PCC actually is...

The common consensus amongst MPs as the phone-hacking scandal engulfed the UK media is that the PCC is redundant. Yet the it is still here, dealing with complaints and settling disputes. In fact, the commission has recently made a significant decision regarding a recent complaint lodged by MP Louise Mensch.

Mensch claimed that The New Statesman had misrepresented her views about Sarah Palin and had portrayed her as a 'cheerleader' for the US politician, which was not in fact the case, the PCC concluded. Initially the MP wanted a printed correction, but the PCC decided an electronic one was all that was necessary, given that the errors were made in online blog posts.

The PCC director Stephen Abell argued that this resolution was "a good example of the self-regulatory mechanism working in the online environment".

However, there are several good examples of why the PCC may not be working outside that environment.

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Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-09-21 12:05

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There have been fresh revelations this weekend about the investigation into the News of The World phone-hacking enquiry and the influence of the Murdoch family within the British political elite.

Former prime minister Tony Blair, who will be the subject of much discussion as the anniversary of 9/11 approaches, will also have to confront speculations that his links to the Murdoch family were even closer than had been previously assumed.

Wendi Deng, Rupert Murdoch's wife, revealed in a forthcoming interview with Vogue magazine, that Tony Blair had been made godfather to Murdoch's 9-year-old daughter Grace. Blair is described in the article as "one of Murdoch's closest friends".

Ivan Lewis, the shadow culture secretary, has publically stated that his party was too close with the Murdoch's media empire and feels 'Labour would probably not support any deal that brought together the largest newspaper group (News Corp) with the largest broadcaster by turnover (BSkyB)'.

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Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-09-05 13:42

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James Murdoch's woes may be many and varied, but one thing is certain: they aren't going to disappear anytime soon.

The New York State Controller Thomas DiNapoli has decided that a $27 million State Education Department deal with Wireless Generation, an affiliate of News Corp., will not go through. The company was to be employed to produce software designed to monitor student performance in tests. However, due to lobbying from teachers' unions and the multitude of unanswered questions about the Murdoch media empire's ethical standards, the controller has decided not to award the contract to the firm.

Hardly surprising, seeing as Murdoch father and son will both be facing a judicial inquiry in the British High Court. Lord Justice Leveson, who has been at the centre of many high profile cases in the past, will hear the pair give evidence under oath. As Christopher Hope of The Telegraph writes: "the prospect of courtroom evidence will increase the impression that the Leveson inquiry is an unofficial 'trial' of key players in the phone hacking scandal."

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/08/the_sorrows_of_young_murdoch.php

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-08-30 16:57

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The repercussions of the News of the World phone-hacking scandal continue to reverberate in the U.K. and Australia this week.

British Prime Minister David Cameron is experiencing renewed political troubles as it was revealed by the BBC's Robert Peston, that Andy Coulson, the PM's former Communications Director, supposedly received payment from News International whilst working for the Conservative Party. What is more, if these allegations are proved to be true, then not only David Cameron himself but his entire party could be facing some tough questions.

Not only does this mean that Mr Cameron may knowingly have employed someone in the pay of Rupert Murdoch, but if these fees are interpreted as donations in kind to the Conservative Party then the part will have broken electoral law, as any donations must be disclosed, as The Guardian outlines.

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Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-08-23 17:18

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Tabloids have been getting some bad press lately. The press as a whole, and tabloids in particular, have been tarred by the The News of The World scandal; but let's not forget that the tabloid is something of a cultural institution. There are undoubtedly some darker aspects to this type of journalism, but provided they keep things above board, surely there is still a place for the humble tabloid in our newsstands?

UK Sunday tabloid sales have been enjoying a boom period since the collapse of The News of The World, gaining an extra 2 million in sales from June to July this year, as The Guardian reports. So it's clear that the love affair with the tabloid is not over for the British public at least.

The relationship between UK readers and Murdoch's tabloids is a long one and it has endured hard times before.

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Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-08-23 13:42

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The phrase "I don't have direct knowledge" has been thrown around often in today's Parliament hearings with Rupert and James Murdoch.

In the conference, British lawmakers grilled the Murdochs on financial details of settlements, facts about earlier phone hacking cases, political influence, and who exactly was responsible for the illegal phone hacking. Rupert Murdoch prefaced the questions with the statement, "This is the humblest day of my life."

He then distanced himself from responsibility, saying that News of the World represented just one percent of his company and that he was not told by editors about large payments to settle phone hacking cases out of court. His answers were slow and he appeared to have trouble remembering details. His son, James, kept trying to jump in and answer questions, but one Parliament member kept redirecting corporate responsibility questions back to Murdoch senior.

When asked, Rupert Murdoch said that he was "not really in touch". He claimed to talk to his senior editors about once a week, but later revised the answer to once a month. According to him, the conversations remained informal, opening with his question, "What's doing?" and stayed on topics of news stories. He insisted that he did not influence the stories. He later revised his account again, saying that he would not normally pay that much attention to British newspapers that make up just 1 percent of his business.

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Author

Florence Pichon

Date

2011-07-19 19:16

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As the toll of casualties from The News of the World scandal increases, the race is on for other publications, owned by various subsidiaries of the Murdoch media empire, to distance or rebrand themselves so as not to find themselves caught in the line of fire.

Over the weekend yet more senior figures, from the worlds of journalism, politics and policing have been further embroiled in the scandal and have paid the price. Former head of News International Rebekah Brooks (who resigned from her post last week) was arrested and later released while Metropolitan Police Commissioner Sir Paul Stephenson has resigned along with Les Hinton, C.E.O. of Dow Jones, who testified in British Parliamentary Inquiries in 2007 and 2009 attesting that phone hacking was the fault of one single reporter and not symptomatic of wider company policy.

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Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-07-18 16:38

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