WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Thu - 24.07.2014


Multimedia

Although the iPad isn't out in Europe yet (in fact, in a controversial move, Jobs pushed back the European release of the device a month due to high US demand) UK publishers are readying their apps for its May release. Both the Guardian and the Daily and Sunday Express have created iPad apps, the Guardian having released theirs for US customers on April 2.

The Guardian currently has a paid news app on the market for the iPhone and a free photo app for the iPad. The iPhone app, released in December, has since received over 100,000 downloads and, despite its 3.99 price tag, is widely considered to be one of the best available news apps for the iPhone. So it comes as no surprise to find that the Guardian's iPad app, created in conjunction with Cannon, is a hit, receiving 50,000 downloads in only ten days.

It is currently the 28th most downloaded free app in the iPad app store, but those news apps that beat the Guardian app in the store also offer text and other content. Considering the specificity of the content offered by the app, its popularity likely foreshadows even greater success for the Guardian news iPad app.

Author

Alexandra Jaffe

Date

2010-04-15 19:07

Many media outlets and news organizations have recently embraced crowd sourcing and citizen journalism as an effective method of covering the news. RIA Novosti, Russia's state-run news and information agency, recently announced that it would follow the trend.

The agency intends to develop a multimedia project entitled, "You're a Reporter," giving the public a chance to submit their own videos and images to be featured in the news. In the press release, the effort is described as "a multimedia platform, which will collect and post pictures and videos made by everyday Internet users, who have witnessed a remarkable event." Prior to posting, all submissions will be double checked for accuracy by agency workers.

RIA Novosti has high hopes fro the new project. One of its' primary desires is to develop and nurture a permanent group of contributors. Those interested in participating will be able to attend workshops designed to train citizens on the most effective ways to capture and report on what's going on around them.

The "You're a Reporter," project is another step towards RIA Novosti's efforts to develop their Internet outreach. The press release states that a half year ago the agency created a new branch dedicated to following blogs and social networks for any news that might be of interest to them. Critics, however, might suspect that the agency's relationship with the Russian government might raise concerns of censorship.

Author

Robert Eisenhart

Date

2010-04-12 19:19

Nonprofit investigative news site California Watch is still a relatively unknown face in the California news community, so when it wants to get news out it uses all venues available--including, most recently, flier distribution on the UC Berkeley campus.

Upon realizing that one of their recent investigations into the seismic safety of buildings on college campuses in California was not hitting the group it most affected--students--the California Watch team took to the streets of Berkeley to spread fliers with the news. The team posted their news with other fliers, passed it out on the street, and e-mailed it to campus groups. Editorial director Mark Katches says that this is all in the name of informing the public.

"It's no longer just about newsprint, TV, radio or even the Web anymore," he wrote on the site's blog. "California Watch plans to find other untraditional outlets to get the word out when we have an important story to tell."

Author

Alexandra Jaffe

Date

2010-04-09 14:42

The term 'journalism' is a large umbrella covering the multitude of media and topics that come under its shelter. Indeed, branding 'journalists' as but a single breed of professional would be to ignore the differences between what a broadcaster, to say a newspaper columnist, does on a daily basis.

But now it seems that in light of the financial crisis that spurred the media crisis, adaptation has been dubbed the key to survival - something that has seen different branches of the media growing ever closer and at some points intertwine. Despite the fact that journalists may be fighting one battle - that being making the news still marketable - in doing so, they might have injured those on their own team.

On Sunday, the Guardian's Media Commentator, Peter Preston, highlighted that time might be running out for news channels such as the BBC's News 24: something he attributes to the fact that Internet can now report the same information just as effectively, which is all the more accessible thanks to faster video streaming. He even goes as far to suggest; "maybe the whole live loopline news business is doomed."

Author

Helena Humphrey

Date

2010-04-07 14:14

The Associated Press recently announced in a press release that they would be creating four regionally based groups to act as backup "high-level data analysis" team for any reporter in need of such services.

As "Investigative Teams," or "I-Teams" each will be equipped with a set of well-trained hands that have the essential multimedia skills necessary to "produce ground-breaking, exclusive journalism that is important to millions." Each team will start out with individuals knowledgeable in "computer-assisted reporting, public records access, Flash interactive(s), and good old-fashioned source reporting" in addition to on going training.

Since the I-Teams operate independently from regional news organizations, their skills can called upon wherever they are needed.

Author

Robert Eisenhart

Date

2010-04-06 14:19

With the much-anticipated U.S. launch of the iPad coming this Saturday, media executives everywhere are waiting with bated breath for the verdict: Will the iPad save news media? No one's sure yet, but tech columnists across the web who managed to get their hands on advance releases of Apple's tablet computer gave generally gushing reviews of the innovative product, ensuring that consumers will be lining up on Saturday to snap up the small stock of iPads delivered to Apple stores and Best Buy.

At the time of its release on Saturday, users will be able to access over 1,000 apps made specifically for the iPad, with 60,000 books in Apple's e-book store. Among those apps are options from numerous newspapers and magazines, all selling their products with a range of payment plans.

Author

Alexandra Jaffe

Date

2010-04-01 18:54

John Yemma, the editor of The Christian Science Monitor, had some strong words for newspaper websites in an article he wrote for PaidContent: neither paywalls nor multimedia content will save you.

Although Yemma believes that content is king, no news organization has formulated an appropriate response to the problem of losing the value of content on the Internet. Erecting paywalls, like the ones News Corp and the New York Times will in the near future, is just like "sandbagging the tops of levies on the Mississipi," but they are not the answer. Paywalls can't hold the flood back, and the "Internet flood never recedes."
But, it is not multimedia that can hold back the flood either, Yemma claims. Even though users seem to be interested in YouTube videos and interactive games, no one says there will be a great demand for thoughtful interactive content, like graphs on Taliban stronghholds in Pakistan and Afghanistan. Although some media commentators believe in the power of multimedia content, Yemma concludes that "there's no evidence that users love these things so much that they flock to them, stay around, and convert to a news site's brand because of cool multimedia."

The future of newspaper websites for Yemma does not lie in paywalls or multimedia, but in creating relevant content.

Author

Maria Conde

Date

2010-03-30 14:35

As news broadcasters increasingly become news publishers, the latter are aiming to fight back and regain some of their market share by adding daily newscasts to their websites. The New York Times launched their video cast, called TimesCast, on Monday, and as Editor and Publisher reports, Boston Globe's website, Boston.com, introduced GlobeToday on Wednesday.

TimesCast has a behind-the-scenes format, covering the news from the newsroom. The six minute long video begins in the front page planning meeting, where various section editors, from the Washington bureau to foreign news desks, discuss the top news of the day. The rest of the video follows Times journalists through their reporting routines.

Though the Times is offering an innovative look into the newsroom, its attempt at transparency may have fallen short because, just like with C-SPAN, few people are interested in watching newsmakers in the process of making the news.

Author

Alexandra Jaffe

Date

2010-03-25 14:36

Grazia, a European women's fashion magazine is set to release a special '3D' edition of its publication, the Guardian recently reported. Readers who purchase the magazine will be treated with a highly involved 3D experience, using augmented reality codes.

A Belgian newspaper, La Derniere Heure, also recently released a 3D edition, the difference being that it employed the use of 3D glasses.
When placed in front of a webcam or an iPhone, Grazia's augmented reality codes will allow readers to watch a virtual concert of the British band, Florence and the Machine and see a 360 degree view of the latest fashion trends. Readers with an iPhone will be able to take the interactive experience one step further with an application that, among other things, allows readers to interact with the bands lead singer, Florence. The magazine's editor, Jane Burton, described the magazines 3D features as "stunning."

Author

Robert Eisenhart

Date

2010-03-23 15:06

The end result of a collaborative six-month project between USC's Anneberg Journalism School and the Center for Investigative Journalism will premiere March 19th. Entitled "Hunger in the Golden State," the project is a three week-long multimedia series documenting California's growing social issues in light of the economic crisis. A press release from the Annenberg School noted that more than 20 multimedia stories will be released online, over the radio, and on television.

In creating the project, students partnered with professional and experienced journalists from a range of media outlets, such as The LA Times. During the six-month period, students produced stories in a hybrid newsroom-classroom, which the article stated, "broke down...the walls between academic work and real-world journalism."

The final result of the students work is described by Rual Ramirez, a project collaborator and the executive producer of The California Report, as "solid work" of "high-value."

Author

Robert Eisenhart

Date

2010-03-17 15:02

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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