WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Fri - 25.04.2014


Multimedia

As the drama surrounding the Gulf oil spill incident starts to die down, the news industry is taking the time to reflect on the quality of reporting during the crisis. Both multimedia and crowdsourcing technologies are becoming more popular as a method of gathering news, and the Gulf oil crisis offers a kind of case study as to how reporting with technology was conducted and what can be improved upon in the future. Pew Research recently released its analysis on the coverage, claiming the news industry did an excellent overall job covering the Gulf story. Conversely, Al Tompkins from PoynterOnline claims that lessons on reporting can still be learned from this experience, specifically how to handle a crisis reporting and how to improve crowdsourcing techniques.

Author

Stefanie Chernow

Date

2010-08-26 16:05

The Guardian is launching a team focused on multimedia aspects of breaking news stories. The project will deal specifically with sources of technology and crowdsourcing that will ameliorate the newspaper's ability to tell stories online.

Reporter Paul Lewis was promoted within the Guardian to lead the new multimedia team. He was distinguished for using sources of multimedia to cover in-depth details pertaining to the death of Ian Tomlinson at the 2009 G20 protest in London. As a result of his investigative work, Lewis won reporter of the year at the 2010 British Press Awards along with the Bevins Prize Rat Up a Drain Pipe Award for outstanding investigative journalism.

According to Press Gazette, a Guardian News & Media representative stated "Plans for our new special projects team are still being developed. Dan Roberts, who takes over as the Guardian's national news editor next month, will be working with Paul to appoint a small number of staff with a range of relevant skills from within the newsroom and we will be advertising internally for these posts shortly."

Author

Stefanie Chernow

Date

2010-08-25 12:24

The New York Times plans to set up a public beta site on which it can experiment and test its ideas and applications before they go live on the newspaper's website, AdAge.com reported. The beta initiative will begin in July or August, and will be called "Beta620," wherein 620 refers to the paper's street address on Eighth Avenue in New York.

The new platform will be an examination ground for The Times to study and understand the impact of its features on readers and advertisers before they are implemented, thereby facilitating more user involvement with its products, while eliminating the clutter of new products on its main site, according to a blog posted on MediaBistro.com.

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-06-21 10:39

The new Times and Sunday Times websites were launched today, offering a free preview for about a month before going behind a paywall in June. Already, users must register to go beyond the homepage.

As reported last week, the home pages of the new websites look more like their print counterparts and have a stronger multimedia focus. The Sunday Times in particular puts much emphasis on multimedia, leading the homepage with a large photo/video box and accompanying each story with a picture, as well as offering an index of multimedia galleries high up on the page. "We hope we've designed a site that focuses on showcasing that journalism in the cleanest and aesthetically pleasing way possible," said a Times staff member in a live chat.

It is easy to link between the two sites. On the Times site, main stories are accompanied by a 'behind the story' section with links to other articles. Plenty of live chats are offered, both with journalists and with other cultural, business or political figures, such as author Yann Martel. Layout is clear and colourful, with easily-identifiable sections.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-05-25 18:03

The recent media crisis has put a notable strain on the media industry. Despite this strain, which has lead some commentators to claim that print media is dying, there are now more journalism students applying for jobs in traditional journalism than ever before. Roy Greenslade, writing for The Guardian, recently commented upon this surprising fact.

Greenslade states that there is "intense desire to obtain a job on a newspaper." This fact was made abundantly clear last September when 1,200 people in the UK all applied for the same reporting job. Despite the diversity of jobs available in the journalism sector, recent graduates only want jobs at prestigious and well-known publications. According to Greenslade students searching for jobs should look towards other journalism sectors, including local reporting, magazines, and b2b publications.

Author

Robert Eisenhart

Date

2010-05-18 18:01

It is a tense day for the British public as they await news on what yesterday's inconclusive election results mean for the future of the government. And how do news outlets cope with this?

For newspapers, what to lead with in their print editions must have been a difficult choice. Clearly, by the time that the papers reached their readers, many of the latter would already be highly well informed on more up-to-date news from TV and Internet news sources. And with little clear idea of the outcome, offering firm analysis of the situation was difficult. Exit polls (after voting ended at 10pm) predicted a hung parliament with the Tories in the lead, and this is what most papers focused on. Once again, the Guardian helpfully provided screenshots of national papers' front covers.

Some papers, such as the Times, have produced multiple front pages throughout the day/night, with bold headlines such as "The X factor," "Election chaos" and "The cliffhanger." The Daily Express marked editions with "2am latest," "3am latest" and "4am latest," switching from "Brown is on the way out" to "Brown just can't go on" between 3 and 4am. Special late editions of the Sun at 6am and 9am pronounced Gordon Brown to be "Unelected, unwanted, untenable"

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-05-07 16:11

If you thought Apple's iPad was ahead in the battle of the tablets, think again: Google is not only said to be building an edgy tablet but also just purchased BumpTop, a Toronto-based startup that specializes in 3-D multitouch technology.

BumpTop's technology would represent an innovative addition to Google's tablet's repertoire: the ability for users to to toss files and programs around, stack them, and even hang them on tiny digital walls. GigaOm reports that this kind of three-dimensional, multitouch user interface would be a "dramatic departure from the typical 2-D app/icon approach" and present an innovative alternative to Apple's design. This technology could also transform user experience with the product.
Last month, a number of reports about the Google tablet sprung up across the Internet. In April, The Huffington Post called the Google device, which will run the Android operating system and seeks to be very much like a computer, an "iPad killer." At the time, The New York Times also reported that people with knowledge of the project said Google had been experimenting with some publishers to explore the delivery of books, magazines, and other content on a tablet.

Author

Maria Conde

Date

2010-05-04 17:22

The Social Media Club France recently blogged about how the diversification of mobile devices which give readers access to the internet has obviously changed the way users access information. As a result, Social Media Club France recommends that journalists adopt a method of presenting news that is not only interactive but also adaptable to the non-linear diffusion of media.

Prior to the proliferation of smart phones and tablet PCs news was released in a fairly straightforward manner starting either with print or online and slowly working it's way outward. As previously mentioned, though this has changed journalists have not effectively adapted their methods of distribution to capitalize on the way users are consuming data.

Author

Robert Eisenhart

Date

2010-04-29 13:24

Readers familiar with the British daily The Independent will notice something lacking from its pages after its most recent re-launch. According to Press Gazette's The Wire, The Independent no longer has its Monday Media Section. Instead, The Independent's media coverage is now scattered throughout the publication's new "viewspaper" section.

Eliminating the media section may come as a surprise to some. The recent buzz surrounding the launch of the iPad as well as the past year's media crisis would suggest that a media section is both important and relevant as media and technology become increasingly intertwined. However, The Guardian with their Media Guardian section now stands the only publication that devotes an entire section to developments in the media.

The Independent's re-launch has received mixed but mostly positive reviews. The most notable change to the paper is the inclusion of a 20 page "viewspaper" which is a new section that replaces traditional news with analysis and commentary. Peter preston from The Guardian's media blog described the paper as "stylish, cool and coherent," while others remain unconvinced or unhappy with the new changes.

Author

Robert Eisenhart

Date

2010-04-26 17:53

The National Council for the Training of Journalists announced today that it will launch a new Diploma in Journalism to replace its preliminary Certificate in Journalism, reports Hold the Front Page.

The new diploma will feature seven elements, like the past certificate, with five core subjects and two options students can choose from. Students will have to take reporting, multimedia portfolio, shorthand, essential public affairs, and essential media law.

This qualification, widely recognized among media circles and employers, has been preparing for a facelift since 2008.
The chairman of the NCTJ's qualifications board and Sunday Post editor, Donald Martin, told delegates at the launch of the new Diploma that journalists "now operate in a multimedia world. The boundaries between journalism sectors are no longer distinct."

"Employers like me are demanding multi-skilled journalists. And students, who are full of enthusiasm for this new world, want multimedia training, and multimedia NCTJ qualifications."

The NCTJ's qualification change proves just how deeply technology is changing the face of journalism.

Author

Maria Conde

Date

2010-04-22 18:37

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