WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Sat - 02.08.2014


mobile technology

Unlike QR codes, AR uses a phone’s camera to recognize specific images (in this case, newspaper pages) and superimposes information over the camera feed. AR technology opens related links and content within its app, whereas QR codes externally connect to links on mobile web browsers. Industry analysts agree that AR has more potential for newspapers than QR codes, which have been deemed “dead” by most.

Independent+ uses iPhone, iPad and Android app Blippar to update select print stories with new information and additional multimedia features. The newspaper is also using the app to increase audience engagement by allowing readers to vote in polls related to opinion articles. The Independent said AR supplements will be available in all sections of the newspaper, according to Press Gazette.

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-04-26 15:36

There are two similar buzzwords flying around the digital media space right now, and to the uninitiated, responsive and adaptive design might seem like interchangeable labels for the same tech. They are both, after all, methods to optimize web content for mobile consumption -- a challenge that publishers must face if they are to adapt to today's news consumption trends.

A recent Pew Research study shows that mobile users are not just skimming headlines as once assumed, but "many also are reading longer news stories -- 73% of adults who consume news on their tablet read in-depth articles at least sometimes, including 19% who do so daily. Fully 61% of smartphone news consumers at least sometimes read longer stories, 11% regularly." So, having established the importance of offering a site well-adapted for mobile use, the question is: What's the best way to go about getting there for publishers, adaptive or responsive design?

In an attempt to fully understand what distinguishes the two methods, I've been asking experts in media, mobile development and PR from three countries to describe the methods for me in layman's terms. Perhaps unsurprisingly, each had a slightly different explanation, and it turns out that what's best for publishers depends on what they're trying to achieve with mobile.

There are a few ways of comparing the two methods:

The Client-Server Distinction, Simplified

Author

Guest

Date

2013-01-16 18:45

Dear Mario,

Reading your blog today (garciamedia.com), I spotted a June post I had missed: what your dream tablet conference in 2012 would look like. We have just finished the programming for the coming 5th Tablet and Apps Summit (October 30 in Frankfurt).

So I ran a checklist hoping you might agree with our topics and take “your dancing shoes” to our summit…

- We seem to agree that it’s necessary to “Rethink Media Apps on Mobile and Tablets”. What you call the next generation of news apps.

- We did not call it an iPad conference. The iPad is still the best. Our speakers from Stern magazine and GQ magazine will probably be with you on that. But from a publisher’s point of view, you need to stimulate the competition. So we have invited a Microsoft evangelist and two European publishers who have started to explore Windows 8 possibilities and tablets.

- We are looking at the wider meaning of mobile platforms. You would probably not recommend that. But we do think it’s important to understand usage in order to better serve tablets AND smartphones.

- We focus on two things that are of importance to you:

Author

Valérie Arnould's picture

Valérie Arnould

Date

2012-10-03 10:56

The first noticeable aspect of the release of Apple’s new iPad, announced yesterday at a launch event in San Francisco, is the fact that it’s called just that: “the new iPad,” rather than the iPad 3 or iPad HD. Why this is, is unclear – is it not sufficiently different to be an iPad3? Or has a decision on a name just not been taken?

The new device, to go on sale on March 16, has:

  • a ‘retina display’ of the type seen on the iPhone 4. For the iPad this means 3.1m pixels, 2048 x 1536 – double the resolution of previous versions.
  • a dual-core ‘A5X’ chip with quad-core graphics
  • 4G/LTE wireless, which is much faster than 3G but currently only available in the US
  • an upgraded iSight camera which has a 5 megapixel sensor and HD video recording capability.
  • voice dictation (in English, French, German and Japanese)
  • updated iWork applications, and iPhoto with more advanced editing options

It does not have haptic feedback, as commentators had predicted, notes the Guardian, or anything in particular that seems to justify the emphasis put on ‘touch’ in the invitation to the event.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-03-08 15:17

Apple's new Siri voice technology might have an impact on news consumption, Patrick Thornton wrote recently on Poynter.

Siri is type of voice technology featured in the iPhone 4S and its peculiarity is that, unlike older systems, it uses natural language processing. That means - the article explains - that instead of having to ask a precise question, users can formulate their queries in different ways and Siri is able to get the answer anyway.

"Rather than remembering strict commands, the language recognition allows us to speak the way we think without hesitation or frequent errors", explains Marco Arment, creator of iOS app Instapaper and former lead developer of Tumblr, quoted in the article.

So far Apple doesn't allow third-party apps to use the technology which is available only for built-in apps on the iPhone 4S but as the article says, this could change soon.

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2012-02-15 18:37

Apple's latest launch event was definitely disappointing for those Apple fans awaiting the elusive beast that is the iPhone 5 - but that doesn't mean that the tech giant's latest announcement, the iPhone 4S, was insignificant, as Mashable explains here.

The recent launch of lower price products, such as the Amazon Kindle Fire, which may prove a serious competitor to the iPad, and Aakash, the US-Indian produced tablet that will be sold to students in India for around $35, has prompted questions about whether Apple can maintain its position as tech-brand supreme. Will the iPhone 4S help in this mission?

Relevant developments for publishers include the fact that the device is more closely integrated with Twitter than ever before and also provides an offline reading mode in its Safari browser- something which may cause annoyance to publishers who rely on online advertising revenues. Newsstand - the cunningly named digital newsstand from Apple - will also be an integral part of the device.

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-10-05 19:12

When the iPad was released a year ago, it was immediately clear that the device offered enormous possibilities for news organisations and publishers in general. With Apple promoting its App Store heavily, it seemed natural to turn to apps as a way of publishing on the iPad. Now, however, as the limitations of that approach are becoming apparent, other options are increasingly discussed.

The buzz around HTML5 has been growing for some time now. Jason Baptiste, CEO of OnSwipe, is one of the advocates of HTML5: in a recent interview with GigaOM, Baptiste noted that HTML5 makes it possible to create web pages that are up to par with native apps in terms of visual appearance and user interface.

Publishing content on the Internet, instead of developing dedicated apps, Baptiste said, would solve one of the main issues publishers have with the current tablet market: to make their publications accessible with all of the devices out there, they have to develop a version for each of the platforms available. All tablet devices naturally have adequate web-browsing capabilities, making HTML5 content free of compatibility issues.

Author

Teemu Henriksson's picture

Teemu Henriksson

Date

2011-05-03 16:29

Nieman Journalism Lab reported on a tricky situation Bianca Vazquez Toness, a radio reporter, found herself in, as on her way to an interview she realised she had left her recording equipment behind. What was there to do? Toness reached for her pocket, recording the interview with her iPhone instead.

The Nieman article pointed out that although Toness was a professional journalist using essentially amateur equipment, it is not a long stretch to imagine an amateur doing the same - and producing decent results. In terms of audio quality, what Toness recorded may not have been up to her radio channel's usual standards, but the material was still usable. The article pointed out that in fact, radio people are often more squeamish than listeners about audio quality.

Neal Augenstein, also a radio journalist, reported earlier this month on his experiment of using iPhone exclusively for his work. Although some issues arose, particularly in terms of audio quality in videos, his conclusion was that iPhone-only reporting is mostly possible.

Author

Teemu Henriksson's picture

Teemu Henriksson

Date

2011-04-29 16:52

Homeless people who sell The Big Issue magazine are to be equipped with smartphones so that they can act as news gatherers in their communities, the charity announced, according to Press Gazette. The vendors will be encouraged to blog and use social networking sites to upload images and videos. "Producing digital content will enable them to engage with a new and wider customer base, as well as equipping them with a number of key skills," the charity said.

John Bird, founder of The Big Issue, said that the magazine's vendors have a unique connection to their local area, thanks to their presence on the streets. "We want them to become the eyes and ears of their neighbourhoods, offering a unique perspective and simultaneously developing the skills which will get them off the streets," he said.

The Big Issue is a weekly magazine, published by The Big Issue Company, which vendors buy for £1 and sell for £2. This offers homeless and and vulnerably housed people the opportunity to earn a legitimate income. There are over 2900 vendors around the UK, and over 670 000 people read the magazine every week, according to the charity.

Author

Teemu Henriksson's picture

Teemu Henriksson

Date

2011-04-19 18:12

When a speaker at a media conference refers to the traditional desktop-based internet as "the old-fashioned internet," you know that the media world is evolving faster than ever.

In language that was once reserved for newspapers, the PC-based internet took a back seat to mobile and tablets at the just-completed Digital Media Europe conference, which drew nearly 250 participants from 38 countries to London this week.

The reach of the new mobile web was evident in the room itself. Those 250 participants had 309 devices connected to the conference Wi-Fi.

But while the internet may be relatively old-fashioned, the challenge it poses for traditional media companies is as fresh as ever.

"You have to face the same problems on mobile that you face on the internet, so mobile won't save us and Steve Jobs is not our saviour," says Morten Holst, Strategy and Business Advisor for VG Multimedia in Norway. "We have to solve the internet problem. When we convert a newspaper reader to the web, then we lose 70 percent of the revenues. When we convert internet users to mobile, you lose 70 percent again. But we don't have a choice, because our readers expect us to be there. But we have to solve this problem."

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2011-04-18 11:13

Syndicate content

Editors Weblog

The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


© 2013 WAN-IFRA - World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers

Footer Navigation