WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Mon - 20.10.2014


mobile

Almost two-thirds of visits to Tamedia’s largest online news site 20min.ch originate from a mobile device, said Gabriele Ottino, the Swiss company’s project manager for business development. The paper has lost traffic on its desktop site, and Ottino believes that “we are in the midst of a total shift.”

In the UK, 45 percent of traffic to the Guardian’s site now comes from mobile, up from a quarter at the beginning of 2012, said Anthony Sullivan, group product manager at the Guardian. At certain times of day, such as early mornings, traffic from mobile has already passed the 50 percent mark, and he thinks that within the next 12 months this will be the case overall. The fastest growth is on tablets, he said. Alex Kozloff, head of mobile at the UK Internet Advertising Bureau, noted that 32 percent of all page views in the UK now come from mobile devices.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2013-04-16 13:11

The Economist, the shining star among weekly news magazines, sells more than 1.5m print copies but fully expects this figure to decline, said Tom Standage, the publication’s digital editor in an AMA (Ask Me Anything) Q&A session on Reddit. So far print circulation hasn’t started to fall, even as digital-only subscriptions grow, “but it will,” Standage asserts.

“The important thing for us is to deliver distinctive content that readers will pay for; whether it's on paper or a screen, or in audio format, is not really the point,” Standage said. “Our aim is to deliver our content in whatever form our readers want it; we are not wedded to print.”

So far, The Economist has 150,000 digital-only subscribers, and a total of 600,000 people use the paper’s mobile apps each week. Seventeen per cent of traffic comes from mobile, and The Economist is “retooling” its site to make it more mobile-friendly, Standage wrote, mentioning that “we will be doing some slightly more daring stuff shortly.”

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2013-01-10 19:48

More than a third of all traffic to The New York Times generates from a mobile device, said Alexandra Hardiman, The Times' Director of Mobile Products at the 5th Tablet and App Summit. And when the paper live-streamed the recent presidential debates, 40% of streamers watched on a mobile device.

Mobile has hence become a key part of the paper’s business, and The Times is putting a great deal of attention into cross-platform usage and mobile-first design, Hardiman said. The fact that tablet use is high in evenings is a very exciting prospect for a news organisation without a broadcast operation, she added, as it is a time of day that papers usually struggle to reach readers.

Tablet and smartphone access is also a key element of The Times’ digital subscription model that has “re-balanced our business,” Hardiman said. The New York Times had 566k paid digital subscribers in Q3, an increase of 11% from the preceding quarter. Perhaps more surprisingly, Hardiman specified that the paper’s print home delivery circulation also increased.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-11-06 12:25

The Summly (n. “summarized version of a news article optimized for iPhone”) might look something like this: On his 17th birthday last Thursday, Nick D’Aloisio (pictured) and his dozen-strong team relaunched Summly, an iPhone app that uses natural language processing and “rocket science” to automatically summarize the news into mobile-friendly, 350-500 character bites. In essence, the app aims to help you cut through the deluge of “drivel” that inundates the newsosphere, with as much style as Arne Jacobson’s Egg Chair – the company’s logo.

“It’s a representation of the egg chair, not the exact egg chair,” specified D’Alosio in a telephone interview with Editors Weblog this afternoon. “The idea is that chairs themselves are kind of synonymous with sitting down, relaxing and reading news, so we decided to take the concept and [give it] a slight twist, with a really modernist approach and minimalist user interface,” he said, pointing out the two S’s that lurk in the symbol.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-11-05 19:34

Windows 8, Microsoft’s first operating system to target touchscreen devices, launched last week following months of anticipation. Several news organisations have already developed apps for the platform, in cooperation with Microsoft.

At the 5th Tablet & App Summit in Frankfurt last week, Frank Wolfram, CTO of SYZYGY Group, Johan Mortelmans, Digital Innovation Manager, Corelio Publishing (which publishes De Standaard) and Danny Lein, Founder and CEO of Twipe Mobile Solutions offered their first thoughts on the new platform.

The key differentiator compared with other mobile operating systems is that Windows 8 provides “the productivity and the consumption world merged into one experience: with a switch of a button you can more between desktop and lean-back,” as Wolfram described.

He believes that the Windows 8 store will hold 150,000 – 200,000 apps by the end of the year, with a focus on quality rather than quantity

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-11-05 18:58

Know your customer, wherever they are, and use that knowledge, advised Stephen Pinches, Group Product Manager for Mobile & Emerging Platforms at the Financial Times, at the 5th Tablet & App Summit last week in Frankfurt. This philosophy is why the paper decided to build its own web-based app for the iPad rather than be part of Apple’s Newsstand: because as well as taking a 30% cut of subscription revenue, Apple does not provide publishers with subscriber data.

Within six weeks of Apple’s demand that publishers offer the same subscription deals through iTunes as they do on their own site, the FT rebuilt its native app as a web app. “It has all the things you would expect from a native app,” Pinches said, but “it allows us to enact whatever business model we choose.”

“We believe that data is fundamental to build our model,” he said, and gave personalized content as an example of how to strengthen relations with readers and offer a better service. “If you are a CEO of a media company we can tell you what other CEOs at media companies are reading.”

For Android devices, the FT took the HTML5 web app and “wrapped it in a little code” to put in the Google store. The paper has already launched a Windows 8 app too.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-11-05 13:04

People have been saying that 'mobile is the next big thing' since as far back as 2001, said Martin Belam at this week's 5th Annual Tablet and App Summit at the World Publishing Expo in Frankfurt.

However, Belam, who is Principal Consultant at Emblem and former UX lead at the Guardian, he thinks it is only recently that “we have finally reached a tipping point in terms of mobile and tablet usage,” pointing out that 60% of traffic to the official Olympic games channels came from mobile devices.

His key advice to publishers seeking to improve their tablet and mobile offerings was:

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-11-02 17:13

French aggregation startup Youmag is seeking to integrate free and paid digital news content in a made-to-measure, virtual magazine format.

Co-founders Antoine Levêque, Nicolas Schaettel and Guillaume Multrier have recently unveiled versions for the web and Android, and Youmag’s free iPhone and iPad apps, launched this past June, were downloaded over 100,000 times in two months.

The concept is simple: personalised aggregation + curation and editorial intervention by a small team of journalists + a freemium model akin to that of music streaming platform Spotify = ideally, a successful company that generates 2/3 of its revenue from advertising, and 1/3 from happy readers inclined to pay for premium content (thereby making publishers happy, too).

Personalised, nuanced aggregation

Let’s say that you are the user. After logging in for the first time, you are invited to select the sections of your magazine from a carousel of themes and sub-themes.

“What really distinguishes us is the thematic approach,” Levêque told me in a phone interview last week. The selection of sub-themes is diverse and nuanced as possible "to be as relevant as possible for users," elaborated Schaettel in a subsequent conversation.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-09 12:05

Just before a networking coffee break in the Chicago Ballroom Foyer this afternoon, Brian Brett, Executive Director of Customer Research for The New York Times, will present the results of a “News Eco-System Study” to attendees of the INMA Audience Summit.

Commissioned by The New York Times, the study was an online survey conducted in the spring by the Knowledge Network, reaching over 3,000 U.S. residents aged 18 to 65 (of whom 85 percent are regular news consumers). Its purpose was to find out how people are consuming news, across platforms and between generations.

Thanks to a preview from Poynter’s Jeff Sonderman, here are four early points from the study’s findings:

1. Facebook is the dominant social network for news, especially for young people and mobile users

Fifteen percent of digital news consumers find news through social media, and Facebook is the place they are most likely to look.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-05 15:42

Even The New York Times’ Public Editor Margaret Sullivan reads the newspaper digitally first. “Certainly before I leave the house in the morning, I’ve gone to The Times website and given it a pretty good read,” she told The Atlantic Wire. “I see it on the web before I see it in print.”

Sullivan is part of a majority (55 percent) of The Times’ regular readers who now click or tap through the paper in web or app form more often than they thumb through it in print, according to a Pew survey published yesterday.

While The Times is presently the only one of America’s three highest-circulation newspapers to have passed the half-way point in its readers’ screenward migration, the nation’s two biggest dailies are close behind: 48 percent of regular USA Today readers claim to access the publication mostly in digital form (tied with 48 percent who lean toward print), and 44 percent of Wall Street Journal readers favour digital, compared with 54 percent who still mostly read the country’s highest-circulation daily in print.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-09-28 17:25

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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