WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Tue - 23.01.2018


long-form journalism

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2013 will see publishing giant Condé Nast launch a French version of Vanity Fair.  The US magazine already publishes international editions in Britain, Spain and Italy and latest member of the Vanity Fair family is set to hit French newsstands before next summer.

Executives will be hoping that further expansion in the European market will compensate for disappointing ad revenue and circulation figures in the US. At the beginning of this year Vanity Fair USA saw circulation decline by almost 5 per cent to 1.22 million. The New York Times reports that Q2 figures for 2012 show that total advertising revenue for the US magazine rose 5.9 per cent, but ‘the number of advertising pages declined by 1 per cent.’

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-18 15:45

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A new long-form journalism website called Mampoer, and based in South Africa, is preparing to launch in the near future, according to journalism.co.uk's Rachel McAthy. Mampoer, "will invite writers to submit pieces of long-form journalism to be downloadable on digital devices," McAthy writes.

Every daily and Sunday title in Northern Ireland suffered circulation declines in the latest ABC report according to an article posted on PressGazette.co.uk. Northern Ireland’s largest-selling daily, The Belfast Telegraph, fell 9.2 percent to 53,847, the article states.

The UK's Independent says prosecutors involved in the phone hacking scandal will reveal a list of the names of up to 600 victims "within weeks."

Author

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-08-23 17:40

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The government of Burma has taken a major step towards freedom of expression, according to a report from The Associated Press and published on the Guardian's website. The country has stopped the practice of requiring reporters to submit their articles to state censors before they can be published.

Rachel McAthy on the journalism.co.uk website offers an interesting look at eight examples of long-form digital content projects.

Recovering Journalist Mark Potts highlights a vision for the future of newspapers written 20 years ago by Robert G. Kaiser, the then-newly appointed Managing Editor of The Washington Post, which as Potts points out, remains "a striking document, even today."

Author

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-08-20 18:43

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Following in the footsteps of recent long-form journalism start-ups, the PostDesk online platform launched today, intent on reinvigorating discussion about long-form content among internet users, according to BetaKit.

PostDesk will cover in-depth news and analysis in the fields of tech, gaming, culture, politics and business, the article said. Only those with early invites can currently access the website, though the temporary PostDesk blog is available to all users. 

“PostDesk is a place to discuss, debate and read free, independent long form content such as in-depth news, reviews, investigative journalism, analysis, critique and controversial opinion pieces,” according to PostDesk’s CrunchBase profile.

For the rest of this article please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-03 18:41

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When it comes to designing tablet apps, can news organizations sometimes be too smart for their own good?

Tom Standage, digital editor of The Economist, recently told the Editors Weblog "Tablet users seem to be particularly keen on reading text, and for long periods."

"That, rather than bells and whistles, is what our apps provide, and what our readers seem to want," says Standage.

To back up his statement, Standage cites a PEW study from October, carried out in collaboration with The Economist Group. The study notes that news users "are highly likely to read long articles on their tablets, not just get headlines." In fact, 42% of tablet news consumers read in-depth articles, versus just 16% who browse news interactively by sharing content on social networks.

Unexpectedly perhaps, readers often do not access these articles through apps. "Contrary to many expectations, news apps have not become the primary interface for news on tablets," states the study. Over a third of users have no news apps at all, and those that do have them don't always use them.

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multimedia/2011/11/when_it_comes_to_designing.php

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2011-11-30 14:16

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When it comes to monetising digital content - an issue just about every major news organisation is grappling with - the discussion too often both starts and ends at the paywall question. This raises the question that many news outlets may be afraid to truly innovate by looking beyond received models in their quest for revenue.

This could be about to change: the emerging e-book publishing trend is reaching such proportions, thanks to several new publications, that news organisations shouldn't ignore the possibilities it represents. What has undoubtedly given a boost to digital publishing is the appearance of electronic publishing start-ups such as The Atavist and Byliner. Thanks to their success, coupled with Amazon's push with its Kindle Singles series, the conditions for monetising long-form journalism have never been so good.

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web_20/2011/09/news_organisations_its_time_to_look_into.php

Author

Teemu Henriksson

Date

2011-09-14 16:09

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The Gothamist, a snarky daily weblog covering New York City's news stories and local events, is branching out into long-form journalism, according to Paid Content.

The experiment hopes to disprove the belief that long-form journalism is not profitable and doesn't pay well. The chosen journalist will receive $5,000 for a 5,000 to 15,000-word piece. On its site, The Gothamist requests that the piece be relevant to its audience of "over one million 20-36 year-old readers in New York, timely but with a shelf-life longer than a week".

The venture is starting small. For the moment, the Gothamist has plans for one piece a month. It plans to publish the piece on the Kindle and Apple products for somewhere between $1 and $3.

If the Gothamist manages to turn a profit on this move, it may be the first. A few other ventures into long form journalism have generated buzz, but business models are still uncertain.

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/06/the_gothamist_launches_long_form_experim.php

Author

Florence Pichon

Date

2011-06-24 17:11

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On Monday, Amazon announced that John Locke became the first independent author to join the ranks of those who have sold a million or more books on Amazon's Kindle. Locke published his books entirely through Amazon's self-publishing system, selling his action and adventure stories for 99 cents.

Noting the business opportunity that a 35-cent profit margin on every 99-cent provided, Locke said he "set a goal to become the world's greatest 99-cent author."

Kindle's self-publishing model has been praised for freeing authors from dependence on third-party deals, but that is not the only publishing opportunity it provides. It also promotes shorter reading material, as many readers are more likely to turn to shorter stories over novels to avoid staring at a small screen for hours at a time. This is good news for long form journalism, which does not always find its place in digital news.

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Author

Florence Pichon

Date

2011-06-21 14:01

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The New York Observer, the Manhattan weekly salmon-coloured magazine, is launching today, June 8th, a redesign of both its website and its print edition.

As Yahoo!'s The Cutline noted, this alone is hardly newsworthy as during the past two years the paper has gone through several changes, getting through three editors-in-chiefs and about as many redesigns in print and online.

According to the article however, the newest top editor Elizabeth Spiers announced that this time the publication is "going back in the direction that it probably should have stayed on".

On the print side Spiers announced that the idea is to go back to treating the paper like a newspaper, albeit in a tabloid format, leaving some previous elements that seemed more suitable for white glossy paper magazine in favour of a cleaner version, more suitable for salmon newsprint.

However, the main changes seem to affect the website in order to give emphasis to long-form articles and adopt a clearer and more readable layout. The paper abandoned its former content-management system Drupal, turning to a lighter WordPress CMS. As the article reported, the new web version will accommodate more breaking news and higher volume posting.

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/06/the_new_york_observer_to_redesign_its_pr.php

Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-06-08 16:20

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Has the news article become outdated as the principal way of conveying information? An increasing number of voices are saying so.

Jeff Jarvis's blog post from last week about the role of the article generated some discussion. In his post, Jarvis argued that the article form is not the best way to convey information in many cases. Instead, journalists and news organisations should explore other options for reporting and write articles only when they are necessary.

Business Insider's Jonathan Glick agreed with Jarvis, arguing that turning short news bites into articles doesn't add much value to the information and probably isn't what most news consumers want anyway. He suggested that news nuggets and long-form journalism would eventually go their separate ways. His logic is that articles, and other types of journalism that add value to information in the form of analysis and context, would thus be easier to monetize, as readers are generally more willing to pay for lengthy pieces than for quick news updates. Short, "snack-size" news will, instead, form part of readers' constant and free news stream.

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/06/as_news_goes_more_intensely_digital_what.php

Author

Teemu Henriksson

Date

2011-06-06 17:13

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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