WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

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Fri - 19.01.2018


Latin America

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The New York Times is planning to further extend its international reach and tap into the promising Brazilian advertising market by launching a Portuguese-language website in the second half of next year.

The revelation follows a similar move by the Financial Times, which opened a newspaper printing plant in São Paulo earlier this month, and is taking strides to expand its Latin American web presence with a tailored homepage and mobile app.

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-17 15:51

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Venezuelans take to the polls on Sunday in what many commentators are describing as the most important election in a generation – not only for the oil-rich nation but also for the entire continent. Despite reports of an alarming increase in attacks against the media that have constricted open debate, public opinion may not be as one-sided as official statistics suggest. With rising discontent and a polarised electorate, the stage is set for a dramatic run-in this weekend that could have reverberations for Leftist governments throughout the Americas.

If Public TV were sole barometer for electoral opinion, opposition candidate Henrique Capriles would have abandoned his campaign months ago. Coverage of incumbent President Hugo Chávez in the public media has eclipsed that of his unifying challenger, with years of government manoeuvring having succeeded in turning the state’s media apparatus into nothing short of a pro-Chávez propaganda machine. This is despite strict rules limiting both candidates to only three minutes of airtime per-day. The last private station to have sparred with the government, Globovisión, was relieved of over US$2 million following a Supreme Court decision to uphold fines many perceived to be in direct retaliation for the channel’s critical coverage. Despite the setback, the channel has continued its pro-opposition stance.

Author

Andrew Heslop

Date

2012-10-05 17:39

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When it comes to press freedom, Latin America's reputation is less than stellar. Over the course of last week the International Freedom of Expression Exchange (IFEX) reported an arson attack against a radio station in Argentina, two newspaper employees going missing in Mexico, a journalist being beaten and stabbed eight times in Bolivia, and an editor going on hunger strike in Venezuela to protest his imprisonment. And that's not even a complete list.

 

 

 

But despite the challenges, there are reporters who won't be deterred from chasing serious stories. Their work is independent, investigative, online - and thriving.

 

 

Plaza Pública

 

 

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WEF ID: 
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WEF URL: 
analysis/2011/11/on_the_cutting_edge_digital_investigativ.php

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2011-11-24 11:09

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The Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas, in conjunction with the Open Society Foundation, released a new digital book about the "Coverage of drug trafficking and organized crime in Latin America and the Caribbean".

The book, available in English and Spanish, is the result of discussions held at the 8th Austin Forum on Journalism in the Americas at the University of Texas in September 2010.

The book "captures the intense and violent working climate journalists face on a day-to-day basis, one that spawns self-censorship and questions of how coverage can better inform the public", Knight Center News says.

The risks that journalists face in reporting on drug wars, especially in a country like Mexico, have already been amply reported. As previously noted, the country is, together with Pakistan, one of the most dangerous countries for journalists' work.

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WEF ID: 
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WEF URL: 
newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/05/crime_reporting_in_latin_america.php

Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-05-24 16:33

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With the current atmosphere among Western newspapers being apocalyptic at worst and only carefully optimistic at best, it is easy to forget that things aren't quite as bad everywhere. Quite the contrary: newspapers in India and Latin America seem to be doing remarkably well.

The Globe and Mail reported on Indian newspapers, which are currently seeing an extraordinary rise in readership numbers. For example, NaiDunia (Hindi for "new world") has increased its circulation from 500,000 to 800,000 copies a day - in two years.

Meanwhile, newspaper circulation is also growing sharply in some Latin American countries, most notably Brazil (29 percent), MediaShift reported, noting the palpable sense of dynamism in the industry, mentioning the effective newsroom of El Tiempo, Colombia's leading daily, in particular.

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WEF ID: 
23587
WEF URL: 
newspaper/2011/05/no_crisis_in_sight_newspapers_in_india_a.php

Author

Teemu Henriksson

Date

2011-05-13 18:52

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