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A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Tue - 02.09.2014


Knight foundation

The Washington Post has developed a prototype of a news application that could be used to fact-check live speeches and debates. The app is called Truth Teller, and it was built with funding from the Knight Foundation’s Prototype Fund

According to the paper’s executive producer for digital news, Cory Haik, the project was inspired by politics editor Steven Ginsberg’s visit to a Michele Bachmann rally in August 2011, where the politician repeatedly misled her audience. Ginsberg realized that nobody in attendance seemed to be know they were being misled, and thus the idea to create a real time fact checking device was born.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2013-01-29 18:54

The Center for Investigative Reporting (CIR) plans to launch an investigative news YouTube channel in July 2012, according to a press release. Funded by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, the channel will spotlight videos from prominent broadcasters such as NPR, ABC News and the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, among other freelance contributors, the release said.

The CIR, a nonprofit organization that produces public interest investigative journalism, will teach reporters working for the channel how to best reach online audiences, the release said. CIR and the Investigative News Network (INN) will also coordinate to try to capture the interest of online users through social media, the release said.

Michael Maness, Knight Foundation Vice President for Media Innovation and Journalism, said in the release, “This collaboration is poised to bring investigative reporting authoritatively onto the social web. We hope it will engage audiences and expand public appetite for visual story telling.”

Author

Gianna Walton's picture

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-12 12:32

On 9 February the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation announced the 2012 News Challenge. The annual contest in media innovation, which "seeks new ways to meet community information needs in the digital age", has been renewed, expanded and narrowed, as John Bracken, director of the journalism and media innovation at Knight, explains.

After an initial programme of 5 years during which $27 million have been granted and 12,000 applications made, the new contest has been broken up into three different challenges.
The theme of the first contest is "leveraging networks" and applications will open on February 27th.

The aim of the contest is not to invent a new network, Knight's vice president for journalism and innovation, Michael Maness, explains in a video, but to use existing platforms and tools to make new models or apps that benefit story-telling, investigative reporting and boost innovation in journalism.

Knight News Challenge 2012 from Knight Foundation on Vimeo.

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2012-02-13 17:30

It's not just print that's going digital, but radio as well.

NPR has been granted $1.5 million by the Knight Foundation to train staff at local radio stations to use digital media effectively. The money will be used to help member stations collaborate with each other as part of a news network and to grow the stations' audience across different platforms.

The Knight Foundation's funding will power a two-year program, training reporters at 70 of NPR's 268 stations. The scheme follows on from the $1.5 million grant that the foundation gave NPR in 2007 to improve its journalists' digital skills.

Knight Foundation president and CEO Alberto Ibargüen is quoted in a press release: "NPR is a great news organization and has become an essential part of American democracy. We want to support their embrace of the Internet." The Knight Foundation is serious about its support of public radio; it has invested a total of $5.4 million in NPR since 1992.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2011-12-14 18:53

Young people in Viginia, USA have the opportunity to learn how to become digitally savvy students thanks to a project called Globaloria, run by the World Wide Workshop, a non-profit that develops social media and technology applications for use in education.

The project, funded in part by The Knight Foundation, aims to instruct kids in how to read and write with new media. But this is not standard literacy lesson; 'reading' new media might mean understanding how to play and navigate game structures, 'writing' new media might mean learning how to code. The scheme aims to teach young people about how media works, so they can better understand the media they consume and potentially start learning the skills that would stand them in good stead to enter the media industry in future.

The project is now in 50 schools around the state and it is now in the process of becoming a state-funded initiative as it expands and is offered to more students in more schools. Amy Starlight Lawrence, program associate at Knight Foundation said: "Globaloria showed that by enabling students to learn by creating content in the form of games, they furthered their learning goals and digital knowledge".

So maybe computer games in class aren't such a bad idea after all.

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-12-12 19:05

In the MIT Media Lab, Dan Schultz, newly named Knight-Mozilla fellow, is working on something that could benefit journalists and readers alike, Nieman Lab reports. His invention could change the way you see the world - but he is not developing a pair of rose tinted spectacles - Schultz is creating "truth goggles".

These "truth goggles" are intended to take the form of open source software that journalists and readers alike can download for free and then, when they read articles, any claims that seem to be founded on dubious information would be highlighted and brought to the readers attention.

The software will rely on natural language processing, the same kind of technology that enables Siri to understand human speech, and analyse articles looking for statements that match subjects covered by research contained in the PoltiFact database. Subjects discussed in articles that match the database can then be given an equivalent rating, from 'true' all the way down to 'pants on fire'.

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-11-24 13:28

"'I'm learning to code' is the new 'I'm working on a novel.'"

So tweeted, Roy Bahat, head of IGN last Wednesday. If it's true, then the Mozilla Festival 2011, which ended yesterday is the new literary event of the year. It's writers are prolific: in just 48 hours they've churned out a data journalism handbook, to be published next week.

The event set participants design challenges to do in real time with relevance to the three core themes: media, freedom and the web. As the website puts it "this is one of the largest hackjams you'll ever see".

So what came out?

First and foremost, the handbook. Liliana Bounegru from European Journalism Centre [EJC], who leads the projects, explains in a YouTube interview that the purpose of the handbook is to give reporters who are beginning to work in data journalism "a starting point".

"There are a lot of useful resources on the web," she said, "but they are all scattered in different places. So what we're trying to do is put everything together and have a comprehensive step-to-step guide".

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2011-11-07 19:11

The Seattle Times has completed a major restructuring of its newsroom, aiming to shift the focus from the print cycle to the paper's digital content, as The Knight Digital Media Center reports. The paper joins other publications, like the Witchita Eagle, that have recently reorganised their newsroom to prioritise digital content.

At the heart of the move are three essential principles: Creation, Curation and Community. What does that actually mean for the newsroom in real terms?

The function of each member of staff at The Seattle Times is accounted for in these three stages of development. Creation refers to the journalists themselves, those who gather news, write news or document it in images or video. Curation is the process of presenting the news, designing the digital (or print) format in which selected news stories appear, a task that is handled by the production staff.

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-09-22 14:51

The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation announced yesterday, June 22nd, the 16 winners of the fifth Knight News Challenge, the media innovation contest which awards about $5 million a year "for innovative ideas that develop platforms, tools and services to inform and transform community news, conversations and information distribution and visualization", the site says.

The Knight Foundation launched this five-year Challenge in 2006 aiming to fund community news projects that best use the digital world to connect people to the real world in the aim to advance the future of news.

For five years since then the annual competition has been finding and funding the best "ideas, prototypes, products and leadership initiatives" in journalism: $27 million were invested and 12,000 applications made.

As the five-year commitment is coming to an end the announcement of the last winners prompted reflections about how the media and news environment changed during these years.

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-06-24 12:11

In the world of constant technological innovation, journalists report on new web tools and Internet phenomenon without really understanding the data behind it or who to contact for a better understanding.

According to Nicolas White, the co-founder and CEO of The Daily Dot, data skills are necessary to interpret the way the web works. Information is plentiful, but the ability to make sense of it all of it is not. As everyday brings a new flood of data and information, the Daily Dot advises publications to hire mathematicians to gather and understand information. Degrees in the humanities are not sufficient for deep insight into digital communities. White demonstrates The Daily Dot's commitment to this principle - the first hire of the self-proclaimed "hometown newspaper of the world wide web" was not only a journalist, but also a programmer.

Author

Florence Pichon

Date

2011-06-24 11:28

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