WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Tue - 02.09.2014


journalists

Last month Julius Genachowski announced he was stepping down as chief, as President Obama looks to appoint a new FCC chief in his second term. In his four years, Genachowski expanded broadband Internet service to Americans, but battled with finding common ground between public-interest groups and the telecom industry.  

While journalism is not a core concern for the FCC, the publication of the “Information Needs of Communities” report in 2011 raised the possibility that the commission would play a more active role in the news industry. The report recognized the challenges in the news industry but did little to help, as the Pew State of the Media report showed last month. 

CJR reported that “[journalists] want an FCC chief who will put an end to further media consolidation, make political ads more transparent, and increase diversity of media ownership and coverage.”

The importance of the FCC chief is tantamount, says CJR. In regards to media consolidation, “[The FCC chief] will likely decide whether Rupert Murdoch and other big media owners will be allowed to own both newspapers and TV or radio stations in large markets.”

An FCC media ownership survey released in November revealed a lack of diversity of who owns the nation’s TV and radio stations.

Author

Briana Seftel

Date

2013-04-05 17:09

‘Proustian’ is right. As predicted, Lord Justice Leveson’s report, published at 1.30pm this afternoon, is no pamphlet, running to four volumes and over 2,000 pages. What follows, therefore, is an attempt to briefly summarise the findings of the report and its reception amongst journalists and politicians, to be followed (possibly tomorrow) by a longer analysis of its recommendations.

The report itself breaks down into three main areas, the first of which concerns the relationship between the press and the police. Leveson finds that, whilst there was no endemic or institutionalised corruption in the force as a whole, several poor decisions were made during the original phone-hacking investigation. In response, the judge makes a number of minor recommendations, including the introduction of the practice of recording the interaction between police officers and journalists on a regular basis.

Author

Frederick Alliott's picture

Frederick Alliott

Date

2012-11-29 19:35

A ‘dossier’ signaling an imminent ‘coup’ from that ‘incestuous […] quasi-masonic nexus’, the ‘Left’s old boy network’; it could only really be one UK newspaper, couldn’t it. Never one for sending its cavalry round the flank, today’s Daily Mail charges headlong into the boggy mire of the Leveson battlefield, bayonets fixed and ready for a scrap. Over the course of its front page, five subsequent double-page spreads and its main leader column, the paper marshals a typically uncompromising thesis of corruption, cronyism and general left-wing Establishment conspiracy which, it fears, threatens to inveigle the otherwise irreproachable Lord Leveson’s august inquiry down the path of unrighteousness, imperiling freedom of the press and the world as we know it. Or something like that.

Author

Frederick Alliott's picture

Frederick Alliott

Date

2012-11-16 19:22

‘By golly, it’s political, this Leveson business’. So says Quentin Letts, prolific freelance journalist writing for the Press Gazette, and it’s difficult to disagree with him. The delay in publication of Lord Justice Leveson’s report on the culture, practices and ethics of the British press has exposed a vacuum into which the various vested and political interests of core participants have been aired, and Letts seems to speak for much of Fleet Street when he says that the British Establishment, in its response to the phone-hacking scandal, ‘has over-reacted like a coach party of goosed mother superiors’.

Evidently, his is also a political opinion, with Letts a card-carrying member of the ‘do-nothing’ party. Such an attitude is unsurprising: what is notable is the extent to which whole media organizations are flagrantly jockeying, lobbying and positioning, actively attempting to influence the landscape of the media in the aftermath of the inquiry. 

Author

Frederick Alliott's picture

Frederick Alliott

Date

2012-11-13 19:33

‘Post-truth politics’. The expression has an undeniable ring to it. Fusing a modish anti-politics sentiment with pleasingly Orwellian overtones, the phrase has come to symbolize the pessimism and contempt that has permeated much of the media commentary during the lead-up to today’s Presidential election. Orwell himself said that in times of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act; whether or not the 2012 campaign ought to be castigated as being especially mendacious, the central role of websites such as FactCheck and PolitiFact suggests an urge to scythe through the dense undergrowth of shrill partisanship in search of something that is empirically, verifiably, irreducibly ‘true’. 

Author

Frederick Alliott's picture

Frederick Alliott

Date

2012-11-06 18:54

The suspension of New York Times columnist Andrew Goldman after posting offensive comments on Twitter has once again focused debate on the practicality or otherwise of social media ‘codes of conduct’ for journalists. Goldman, a freelance writer who regularly contributes the ‘Talk’ feature of the NYT magazine, found himself in hot water after he responded intemperately to criticism of his line of questioning to the Hollywood actress Tippi Hedren in a previous article. The subsequent altercation on the micro-blogging site with novelist Jennifer Weiner and others did not, to echo the Emperor of Japan in 1945, necessarily develop to his advantage.

Ironically, the initial question posed to Hedren – whether she had ever considered sleeping with a director in order to advance her career – might be reasonably defended as cheeky yet not entirely inappropriate, particularly since she was famed for having rebuffed the lecherous advances of Alfred Hitchcock, to the considerable detriment of her career.  His tweeted response, however, proved to be what some are already calling the ‘Tippi point’ vis a vis giving him the benefit of the doubt:

Author

Frederick Alliott's picture

Frederick Alliott

Date

2012-10-18 15:15

When Washington Post blogger Elizabeth Flock resigned from her position after making her second aggregation error in four months on blogPost, the Post’s breaking news blog, ombudsman Patrick Pexton wrote an opinion piece asserting that the paper had failed Flock as a young journalist; soon after Pexton’s column was published, a wave of criticism and concerns about the dangers of blogging surfaced, Poynter reported.  

According to Pexton’s article, Flock was often the only reporter writing for blogPost, writing an average of 5.9 posts per day on a wide array of topics. The blog was meant to achieve 1-2 million views per month, the article said.

Flock’s first error, which earned her a strongly-worded editor’s note criticizing her actions, was in reporting a viral but false story that Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney had used a slogan favored by the Ku Klux Klan in one of his speeches—without calling the campaign to confirm before publishing, the article said.

Author

Gianna Walton's picture

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-24 17:27

The Committee to Protect Journalists reported yesterday that two British journalists of Algerian origin were killed by Syrian forces in Darkoush on Monday, while a third was wounded.

The independent journalists, identified as Naseem Intriri and Walid Bledi, were in the process of filming a documentary about Syrians’ escape from the conflict to neighboring Turkey, the article said. The Syrian army fired at the home where the three journalists and other Syrian activists were seeking refuge, the article said.

Intiri and Bledi initially fled for safety, but were shot upon returning to the house to get equipment, the article said.

After tentatively reporting yesterday that the Syrian Revolution General Commission said two journalists were killed, The Guardian recently confirmed reports of the shooting, citing the CPJ and Spanish newspaper El Mundo.

The British Foreign Office is currently investigating reports of the attack, according to journalism.co.uk.

Author

Gianna Walton's picture

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-03-28 16:58

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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