WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Thu - 29.09.2016


journalism

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As you are very nearly certain to have read, physicists at CERN, the European Center for Nuclear Research in Geneva, made a brain-bending announcement yesterday: the Higgs boson, or at least a “Higgslike” subatomic particle, is very nearly certain to exist.

What on (or beyond) Earth does that mean?

The Internet is awash with explanations, so many of us are probably nearly certain to have a pretty good idea. But in the grand tradition of high school science class, let's double-check with a pop quiz:

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-07-05 17:50

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For a few hours it seemed as though progress was being made in penetrating the wall of censorship that the Chinese authorities had built around the country’s Internet services. Yet barely 24 hours after it was registered, The New York TimesSina Weibo account was suspended, before being mysteriously reinstated early this afternoon. The Times had joined Weibo, the Chinese Twitter-equivalent, at the same time as it launched its Chinese language site, http://cn.nytimes.com, and within a few hours the NYT account had been "liked" by 3,300 people.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-06-28 13:28

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A new story has surfaced in the on-going debate about how far media needs to go in its quest for journalist neutrality.

Jim Romenesko reports on his blog that Kevin Corrado, president and publisher of the Green Bay Press-Gazette has harshly criticized 25 journalists working for Gannett Wisconsin Media for signing a political petition, advocating the recall of Wisconsin governor Scott Walker.

Corrado writes in a column for the Press-Gazette that disciplinary measures are being taken against the reporters who signed the petition, on the grounds that signing the petition has compromised their journalistic impartiality. He states that what they did was “wrong” and the company is considering providing all its journalists with additional ethics training.

Corrado writes, “the principle at stake is our belief that journalists must exercise caution and not cause doubts about their neutrality, especially at a time when the media is under a microscope and our credibility is routinely challenged.”

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-26 18:04

Text: 

The Journalism Foundation, an independent charitable organisation that aims to encourage press freedom and investigative journalism both in the UK and abroad, has been launched today.

The foundation is backed by the Lebedev family, who became the owners of The Independent in 2010, a newspaper for which Simon Kelner, the foundation's Chief Executive Officer, was editor in chief for ten years. The trustees of this new non-profit, according to the Journalism Foundation's website, are: "Baroness Kennedy, the renowned human rights lawyer, Lord Fowler, former chair of the House of Commons media select committee, and Sir John Tusa, former director general of BBC World Service". Evgeny Lebedev, Chairman of The Independent and The Evening Standard, will head the board.

The organization aims to support public interest journalism by backing investigative journalism, community reporting and encouraging press freedom in nations like Tunisia where, in the aftermath of massive political change, press freedom is a newly nascent possibility. The foundation also aims to establish bursaries for individual journalists and run a yearly award to recognize achievements in the field.

Link: 
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WEF ID: 
24290
WEF URL: 
newspaper/2011/12/the_journalism_foundation_launches.php

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-12-05 12:56

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What does journalism today have in common with the 1960s steel industry? Quite a lot, argued Dawn Williamson of Chartbeat, speaking today at "Les Nouvelles Pratiques du Journalisme" conference, hosted by the Ecole de journalisme de Sciences Po, Paris, in collaboration with Columbia Journalism School.

Before the 1960's the steel industry was dominated by big, inefficient, expensive steel plants. But then something changed. The industry was revolutionised by the introduction of "mini-mills" - smaller, cheaper, faster plants. Yet the big steel companies didn't want to adopt minimills, says Williamson. They were suspicious of the quality of their new competitors.

Today, Williamson argues, news sites like The Huffington Post, Gawker and Business Insider are the "mini mills of the journalism industry". Through a combination of news aggregation, blog hosting and user engagement, they're producing a journalism product that's faster and cheaper.

Link: 
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WEF ID: 
24282
WEF URL: 
newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/12/dawn_williamson_datas_not_a_report_to_re.php

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2011-12-02 12:13

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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