WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Sat - 16.12.2017


job cuts

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Alan Rusbridger, the editor of The Guardian, spoke to BBC Radio 4's Media Show about the paper's recent decision to face the future with a "digital-first" strategy. He confirmed what most commentators already suspected, namely that the new strategy would result in "significant" job cuts.

According to Rusbridger, The Guardian's declining revenues and print readership are in line with the developments in the industry in general. He described the new strategy as a response to a "pre-crisis moment", a change of course before the newspaper is forced to make vicious editorial cuts, resulting in a lower-quality paper: "You don't want to get into that spiral of decline that we've seen with a lot of American newspapers."
As part of the strategy involves moving mobile and multimedia journalism to a more prominent place, the paper is preparing to hire more developers and other staff with expertise in digital news.

As for the resulting editorial changes, Rusbridger acknowledged that the paper couldn't employ as many people in the future as it does now. "We will need to lose significant numbers but we don't need to do it by tomorrow. We can do it over the next couple of years and we can have a civilised conversation about that." Including its sister publication The Observer, The Guardian currently employs 630 journalists.

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/06/guardians_digital-first_strategy_to_incl.php

Author

Teemu Henriksson

Date

2011-06-24 12:43

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The Oregonian has plans to extend its hyperlocal strategy, Editor & Publisher reports. The publication, which already has 17 hyperlocal community pages on its web-partner Oregon Live, says it will be "adding more content to the existing pages and creating new ones in 2011."

The hyperlocal site focuses on sectional community news and allows readers to post relevant comments, news and event information on town-specific public blogs. Oregonian editor Peter Bhatia said, "They create room for a depth and breadth of community-level news that we never have had room for in the paper."

He also notes that the hyperlocal pages also deliver content to its Saturday "Community News" section which "combines several neighboring communities into one section and include items posted to the community public blogs."

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WEF ID: 
22678
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multimedia/2010/11/the_oregonian_has_plans_to.php

Author

Grace Donoso

Date

2010-11-12 12:50

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AOL's hyperlocal news project, Patch, saw a huge boost in its traffic due to the November 2 midterm elections. According to Editor & Publisher, the network had a 300 percent traffic increase as visitors sought local results for the mid-term elections.

Warren Webster, president of Patch, said that Election Day accounted for the network's biggest traffic day yet, with the Santa Cruz Patch being the most popularly searched area.

The company, who said it is going to be the largest employer of journalists in the nation, has launched hyperlocal sites serving populations ranging from 15,000 to 75,000 across the United States, from Washington State to Rhode Island. However, the company is still expanding and according Nathalie Broizat, aims to cover 500 towns and regions by the end of the year.

In 2010 alone, Patch has hired 600 journalists and is still adding to that number. So where does this leave traditional local newspapers? Will the growth of Patch result in even further declines in local publications?

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WEF ID: 
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multimedia/2010/11/patch_sees_boost_in_traffic_on_election.php

Author

Grace Donoso

Date

2010-11-09 16:47

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The culture and technology surrounding online journalism creates an increasingly fast-paced work environment with expectations to get the news out first. While editors need to keep up with these relatively new trends, problems arise concerning how these requirements for the industry may push a higher turnover rate. The New York Times recently covered the effects of employee burnout at Politico, where an April fools joke of requesting the staff to start work at 5 am was taken seriously by the journalists.

Turnover and burnout of newspaper employees may be not just a result of increased pressures in the business, but rather the responses in tracking progress. Several news organizations publicize which authors receive the most hits on their webpages and pay the journalists accordingly. This method does work as positive reinforcement, yet it also creates unnecessary embarrassment for other journalists who are struggling to write articles that will further impress the readers, and there is a danger that journalists will succumb to writing solely about popular topics. The New York Times also commented that some reporters are encouraged to work nonconventional hours. Employees at Politico commonly receive emails before dawn criticizing them if another newspapers breaks a story first.

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2010/07/_employee_burnout_poses_a_threat_to_jour.php

Author

Stefanie Chernow

Date

2010-07-20 17:47

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The recent media crisis has put a notable strain on the media industry. Despite this strain, which has lead some commentators to claim that print media is dying, there are now more journalism students applying for jobs in traditional journalism than ever before. Roy Greenslade, writing for The Guardian, recently commented upon this surprising fact.

Greenslade states that there is "intense desire to obtain a job on a newspaper." This fact was made abundantly clear last September when 1,200 people in the UK all applied for the same reporting job. Despite the diversity of jobs available in the journalism sector, recent graduates only want jobs at prestigious and well-known publications. According to Greenslade students searching for jobs should look towards other journalism sectors, including local reporting, magazines, and b2b publications.

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2010/05/how_bright_is_the_future_for_journalism.php

Author

Robert Eisenhart

Date

2010-05-18 18:01

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The Sunday Times editor, John Witherow, told his staff at a meeting last Thursday that print-based business is unlikely to be viable in the future. Witherow said the future of news is "digital" and announced the launch of a Sunday Times iPhone app soon, according to Guardian.

This move comes as the editor of the Times, James Harding, announced last Thursday at a meeting with his staff, that the Times would be slashing its editorial budget by 10% and would also be accepting a number of voluntary redundancies that could leave up to 50 journalists without a job. At the time, Harding also said that the Sunday Times would be cutting its budget by 10% and possibly eliminate up to 30 jobs.

At a meeting with his editorial staff, Witherow confirmed the budget cut and cited an advertising downturn as the cause of the newspaper's woes.
Although printed news was unlikely to be viable in the near future, Witherow said that the "future was digital" and announced the launch of a Sunday Times iPhone app in the future to help boost revenue. No details on when this iPhone app would be expected to launch were given.

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newspaper/2010/05/sunday_times_confirms_staff_cuts_and_pla.php

Author

Maria Conde

Date

2010-05-17 17:30

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Guardian reports that in preparation for its June paywall, the Times, will be reducing its editorial budget by 10% and implementing a number of voluntary redundancies that could leave up to 50 journalists out of work.

In a lunchtime meeting at the Times last week, editor James Harding revealed that sister publication, the Sunday Times, would also be cutting its editorial budget by 10%, which could lead to the elimination of 30 jobs. The grand total of redundancies could reach 80.

Staff at the Times have two weeks to apply for voluntary redundancies, this is the only News International publication to offer these, and those who decide to take the offer, would receive four weeks' salary for every year worked plus a four-month notice period.

The Sunday Times staff will also be hearing about the paper's cost saving plans soon, which could be cutting £4.5 million from the current editorial budget of £42.5 million a year, would go into effect on July 1st. It is estimated that The Times and the Sunday Times lose up to £240,000 per day. The company has blamed these losses on an advertising downturn.

After his lunchtime meeting announcement, James Harding emailed his staff and wrote that Times Newspapers (to include both Sunday Times and Times) are suffering "unsustainable" losses, according to Guardian.

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WEF ID: 
21275
WEF URL: 
newspaper/2010/05/guardian_reports_that_in_preparation.php

Author

Maria Conde

Date

2010-05-17 13:10

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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