WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Sun - 21.01.2018


Italy

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On September 26 Italy's supreme court sentenced Alessandro Sallusti, editor-in-chief of the daily Il Giornale, to 14 months in jail for defamation.

Sallusti was found guilty of aggravated defamation over an article that appeared in 2007 about a thirteen-year-old girl who had an abortion. The article was published in Libero, a daily newspaper of which Sallusti was editor-in-chief at the time, and was written by another journalist and signed under the pseudonym 'Dreyfus'. It was considered to be defamatory against the judge of Turin Giuseppe Cocilovo, who gave consent for the abortion. According to Italian law, Sallusti, as editor-in-chief of the paper, is liable for everything that is published, which is even more relevant in case of an anonymous article.

Italy's highest court rejected Sallusti’s appeal and condemned him to 14 months in jail with no parole, and ordered him to pay court expenses and reimburse the plaintiff for a total of €4,500 expenses incurred during the proceedings, A.G.I. reported.

Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2012-09-27 15:44

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After the US, the UK, Canada, France and Spain it’s now time for The Huffington Post phenomon to hit Italy, where L’Huffington Post launched today.

Following the now usual practice of teaming up with a local mainstream news organization, L’HuffPost partnered with Gruppo L’Espresso, publisher of the daily La Repubblica and the weekly L’Espresso, having partnered with Le Monde and Les Nouvelles Editions indépendantes in France and El Pais in Spain.

Former TV journalist and former president of the public broadcasting company RAI, Lucia Annunziata has been named editorial director, while editor-in-chief will be the former editor of L’Espresso Gianni Del Vecchio.

L’HuffPost will follow the recipe of its international counterparts: a mix of reporting, aggregation and crowdsourcing participation in the form of unpaid blogs. A team of journalists, who will be dealing with original content on the site, will go alongside an army of bloggers ranging from well-known politicians of the left and the right, activists, and intellectuals to totally unknown citizens.

Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2012-09-25 18:46

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Italian daily la Repubblica has launched a new platform for users to submit videos. Reporter, as the project is called, is open to everyone, from citizen reporters to video-makers to semi-professional journalists, who can upload their content onto the website. Photos are accepted also but the platform is more focused on video.

Repubblica’s Reporter aims “to turn users into 'aerials' on the ground to contribute to live reporting on Italy”, the website explained.

In order to enlarge and develop its video content, Repubblica is turning to citizens and users with the eventual aim of creating a circle of video-makers who will be available to Repubblica: a network of potential freelancers with a sprinkle of citizen journalists.

The Editors Weblog spoke to Repubblica’s Riccardo Staglianò who explained that Reporter is an improvement of the already existing spontaneous wave of contributions to the paper from readers and non-professional journalists. Before, they could only send an email suggesting a subject or submitting a video, while now Reporter gives readers and video-makers a more organized and formalized structure to contribute to the paper.

Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2012-04-12 18:49

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Liberalization of professional services is on the agenda of the Italian technocrat Mario Monti's government, as part of the wider plans to boost economy, from energy to transport.

Journalists appear to be amongst the professions listed in the regulation reform. Speculations about the alleged changes - the reform bill is a draft and hasn't been approved yet - that will involve the Ordine dei Giornalisti, the professional state-approved body representing Italian journalists, have raised concerns within the profession. It has also provided a boost to reinvigorate the long-time ongoing debate about the possibility of the abolition of the "extraordinary league of journalists".

The state-regulated body defines who, after passing an exam, can officially be called a journalist and has the power of sanction these people in case of ethical misconduct that can lead to their removal from the official journalists' list and a ban on exercising the profession.

The Ordine dei Giornalisti is quite an anomaly within the international journalism landscape and raises questions about state regulation in opposition to a self-regulated approach.

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Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2012-01-20 16:20

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Some Italian newspapers could be at risk due to the cuts in state subsidies that the new technocrat government is planning to implement.

The Financial Times reported last week that about 100 titles are facing closure as Mario Monti's administration confirmed cuts in public subsidies for the press from €170m to €53m budgeted for next year. These had already been proposed by the previous government led by Silvio Berlusconi.

At risk are wellknown papers such the leftwing Liberazione, Il Manifesto and L'Unità, the former communist party daily founded by Antonio Gramsci in 1924 and the Catholic daily Avvenire.

Print publishers in Italy can benefit from direct as well as indirect subsidies. Indirect support includes VAT reductions and reduced postal and telephone rates. Direct subsidies are given to newspapers with at least two members of parliament among the owners or published by co-operatives of journalists.

Italian online-only paper Linkiesta recently explained how direct government financial assistance to the press has developed over recent decades.

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Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2012-01-03 17:57

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The newspaper industry is in a time of upheaval, with mainstream newspapers looking for innovative strategies to survive and thrive, to re-affirm their importance and their role in the news landscape.

Cost cutting is increasingly prevalent throughout news organisations in Europe and the US, with many publications putting more and more emphasis on digital products as they lose print readers.

Launching a new print publication in 2009 might have seemed therefore like a risky step, but it's exactly what Italian journalists Marco Travaglio, Antonio Padellaro and Peter Gomez decided to do. Il Fatto Quotidiano was launched in September 2009 and in the past two years it has managed to both establish itself as a respected newspaper brand and actually make some money, with a profit of €5.8 million in 2010.

How has it achieved this?
The story from the beginning: some dates and figures

Il Fatto Quotidiano - "The Daily Fact" - a daily printed paper published from Tuesday to Sunday, was launched on September 23, 2009. 150,000 copies of the first edition were printed, 32,000 of these being destined for subscribers.

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Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-12-07 12:47

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A 'news 2.0' experiment was carried out yesterday, November 3, in Italy: a three-hour news programme was streamed on multiple platforms, a joint effort of SkyTG24, local satellite TV stations, radio shows and the web.

After seeing his news programme Annozero - which used to air on national broadcasting channel RAI2 - cancelled, anchorman Michele Santoro decided to launch a new programme called "Servizio Pubblico" (Public Service) which is the official description of what the national broadcasting network is supposed to be.

"The civil revolution" - as described by Santoro - was a way to bypass the TV 'monopoly which exists in Italy, aiming to shine a light on the censorship that doesn't provide Italian citizens with all the information they would need, and to show the power of free information which is possible due to the power of the web.

The programme hopes to give the public that information that the authors claim is not provided by TV in Italy, both public and private, which the organizers of Servizio Pubblico blame to be controlled by politics.

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Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-11-04 16:17

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Italian prime minister Silvio Berlusconi's controversial wiretapping bill continues to spark further protests from Italy's online community.

As reported earlier, the bill known as DDL Intercettazioni was initially designed to prevent newspapers publishing information obtained through wiretapped recordings, such recordings having caused significant trouble for the Italian PM after it was discovered he called Italy 'a shit country' and made crass insults about the German Chancellor Angela Merkel.

The most contentious clause of the bill, paragraph 29, also proposed that should any blogger publish information deemed to be defamatory, the blogger would be forced to print a correction within 48 hours of publishing the offending entry else pay a fine of €12,000.

Unsurprisingly, the proposed legislation has caused outcry from the press and the blogging community, with demonstrations in Rome and journalists striking in protest.

Wikipedia has also joined the fight.

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Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-10-06 14:15

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The trial of American student Amanda Knox has been the on-and-off focus of global media attention since 2007, when the murder of British student Meredith Kercher took place in the Italian city of Perugia. This latest trial is an appeal against a verdict given in 2009 that sentenced Knox to 26 years in jail for her alleged role in Kercher's murder. Knox's then boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, was also implicated in the crime and sentenced to 25 years.

Yesterday, the appeal verdict was delivered: not guilty. After four years in jail for Kercher's murder, Knox was released.

Naturally, the media were ready for the announcement. It's an old game, reporting the verdict of a big case. Gone are the days when newspapers would print two copies of their front page - one anticipating a guilty verdict and one in case the defendant were found not guilty - but the guessing, the preparation and the anticipation still remains. Now, in the age of instantaneous digital mobile news, the challenge is to be the news organisaion to break the story first - oh yes, and to be the one that publishes the correct information.


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Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-10-04 14:39

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Italian citizens are preparing to take to the streets of Rome tomorrow in order to protest against the infringement of media freedom in Italy.

Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi has drafted a bill that aims to limit the power of news agencies to publish the content of wiretapped recordings. It's not the first time the Prime Minister has tried to do so. In 2009 he attempted to bring in similar legislation, presenting a bill that would make it illegal for any recordings not made by a so-called 'professional journalist' - i.e. a state-approved member of the Italian National Order of Journalists - to be published.

This time, however, Berlusconi has also managed to enrage the blogging community. One particular clause, known to some as "ammazza-blog" (blog killer), states that if someone feels they have been defamed on a blog they have the right to reply, just as if the same material were published in a newspaper. What's more, if the blogger failed to publish a correction to the offending post within 48 hours, they would face a fine of up to €12,000.

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Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-09-28 16:24

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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