WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

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Mon - 23.10.2017


iPhone

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Today, The Wall Street Journal’s publisher Dow Jones announced the launch of WSJ WorldStream, a “near real-time” video blog that will allow viewers to see the world through the lenses of WSJ reporters’ iPhones.

Hundreds of the newspaper’s journalists have already been trained to double as videographers, according to a memo from Alan Murray, Deputy Managing Editor and Executive Editor of WSJ.com, obtained by Jim Romenesko, in which he announces the platform to staff. Equipped with iPhones, they are instructed to shoot video clips up to 45 seconds in length, and upload them directly to the new WorldStream site. From there, editors will review and post the clips within a tight turnaround.

Once part of “the stream,” the video content can be embedded in text stories, incorporated into live video programming and produced video packages, and watched directly on the mobile-optimized WSJ WorldStream site.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-08-27 18:25

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As 2012 draws ever nearer, speculation about the future of news in the next 12 months is rife. While changes in the year ahead are certain, newspapers haven't stopped innovating simply because the festive season is upon them.

The Sunday Times is preparing a Christmas day edition, the first in the paper's 190 year history, to be released on digital platforms, specifically the iPad and Android tablets. The edition will include interactive elements, such as quizzes and 'rub and reveal' pictures, and will be sponsored by retailer John Lewis so it can be given away as a free download.

The Sunday Times is not the only paper that is investing in digital strategies this Christmas time. Gannett has just purchased a raft of new equipment to enable its journalists to produce multimedia content with greater ease and speed. 'Thousands' of new iPhones and iPads have been bought by the company to equip journalists in making multimedia content and to facilitate news gathering.

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Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-12-22 19:31

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This is a big week for Flipboard. After launching in China on Monday, today the social news reader app has finally released a version for the iPhone.

The new iPhone app does just what Flipboard on the iPad did; collect stories from social media accounts as well as other sources and present them to readers in a visually pleasing format.

But there are significant differences. For one thing, the iPhone app works by swiping up and down, rather than the old format of turning pages from right to left. More importantly, the phone app introduces "cover stories". This new section learns from your interaction with content so that it can deliver stories that are most interesting and relevant to you.

The differences are part of a drive to distinguish between the lean-back platform of the iPad, which most people use before bed, and the lean-forward platform of the iPhone, which users are more likely to access on the go or standing in queues.

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Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2011-12-07 16:25

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Apple's latest launch event was definitely disappointing for those Apple fans awaiting the elusive beast that is the iPhone 5 - but that doesn't mean that the tech giant's latest announcement, the iPhone 4S, was insignificant, as Mashable explains here.

The recent launch of lower price products, such as the Amazon Kindle Fire, which may prove a serious competitor to the iPad, and Aakash, the US-Indian produced tablet that will be sold to students in India for around $35, has prompted questions about whether Apple can maintain its position as tech-brand supreme. Will the iPhone 4S help in this mission?

Relevant developments for publishers include the fact that the device is more closely integrated with Twitter than ever before and also provides an offline reading mode in its Safari browser- something which may cause annoyance to publishers who rely on online advertising revenues. Newsstand - the cunningly named digital newsstand from Apple - will also be an integral part of the device.

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Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-10-05 19:12

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The hyperlocal trend keeps on growing as more and more companies start hyperlocal efforts. The latest one to launch is TapIn, an iPod and iPhone app by the people behind Tackable, an app designed to make newsgathering easy. TapIn, however, is something more ambitious, as it combines several elements that are found in other location-based apps in order to disseminate and gather news.

"We think that it's going to serve as an interesting prototype for the newspaper of the future," Tackable's chief marketing officer Luke Stangel said to Poynter. At the heart of TapIn is the idea of location-based news filtering. It may not be the ideal solution for all situations, as Poynter noted, but can work very well for news outlets that concentrate on community news.

For now, TapIn uses content from the MediaNews Group's newspapers in the San Francisco Bay region, but it already has plans to expand to Los Angeles and Denver markets, where MediaNews has more newspapers.

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Author

Teemu Henriksson

Date

2011-07-13 15:52

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As newspapers compete for online readers, mobile phones have huge potential to draw users online with their portable and real-time news updates.

The Guardian announced on Friday that it has seen more than 400,000 downloads of its mobile newspaper app since it was relaunched in January. The paper reported that it receives 10% of web traffic from its mobile website, a huge jump in growth from 2009, when just 0.6% of readers accessed the site from their mobile phones.

Similarly, in April 2011, MediaWeek reported that Mirror Online's mobile readership reached 8%, although the bulk of online visitors came from work and home computers.

The Guardian's app is free, although it limits content. For £2.99, users can subscribe for 6 months of full access, or £3.99 for an annual subscription. Nearly 70,000 users have opted for a paid subscription, 17% of all mobile readers.

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Author

Florence Pichon

Date

2011-06-13 14:19

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The relationship between Apple and the publishing industry hasn't been the smoothest one, but the tech giant has taken steps towards publishers lately. For one, it is giving a more prominent place for newspapers and magazines in the upcoming iOS operating system, which was announced on Monday at Apple's Worldwide Developers Conference. IOS5 will include a feature called Newsstand, which will improve newspaper apps' exposure and present the user's newspaper app subscriptions in one location.

Yesterday, the press caught on the fact that Apple had quietly made changes to its much criticised in-app subscription guidelines. The most significant change related to app pricing. Mac Rumors was one of the first sites to report that Apple has now removed any specifications regarding pricing from the terms, allowing publishers to now set their prices freely. Previously, Apple had required that app subscriptions sold in the App Store had to be the "same price or less" with subscriptions the publisher offered outside the app.

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Author

Teemu Henriksson

Date

2011-06-10 16:12

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Nieman Journalism Lab reported on a tricky situation Bianca Vazquez Toness, a radio reporter, found herself in, as on her way to an interview she realised she had left her recording equipment behind. What was there to do? Toness reached for her pocket, recording the interview with her iPhone instead.

The Nieman article pointed out that although Toness was a professional journalist using essentially amateur equipment, it is not a long stretch to imagine an amateur doing the same - and producing decent results. In terms of audio quality, what Toness recorded may not have been up to her radio channel's usual standards, but the material was still usable. The article pointed out that in fact, radio people are often more squeamish than listeners about audio quality.

Neal Augenstein, also a radio journalist, reported earlier this month on his experiment of using iPhone exclusively for his work. Although some issues arose, particularly in terms of audio quality in videos, his conclusion was that iPhone-only reporting is mostly possible.

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Author

Teemu Henriksson

Date

2011-04-29 16:52

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Journalists are expanding their boundaries and changing with the times. A new digital world means that they have to not only research and write their story, but also provide pictures and videos. To help them to this end, BBC is giving its reporters smartphones, reported Press Gazette.

After taking a social media course, journalist Chrissy Sturt wrote a letter asking why the BBC didn't supply its journalists with iPhones. "The iPhone is one of the best ways to keep across social media, and when you're out on a fast-moving story they are invaluable," she wrote.

Sturt felt that she and her fellow journalists were being held back by not being supplied with smartphones. "We need these phones, and it's not fair that some people are using their own iPhones to do the BBC's newsgathering."

BBC's head of newsgathering Fran Unsworth took the message to heart. She responded, "We recognise that it is essential for journalists in the field to be connected to the flow of information about the story they are covering. Smartphones, including iPhones, are being rolled out to enable staff to send live and recorded audio, video and stills. A range of models is being used and equipment is being issued as older items come up for replacement."

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Author

Meghan Hartsell

Date

2011-04-15 14:12

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The Dallas Morning News has just launched a paywall on its website, Dallasnews.com. Newspaper subscribers can sign in and continue to access all content free, but non-subscribers will now have to pay. The paper has redesigned its website, and launched new applications for iPhone and iPad.

The price for someone outside Dallas is $3.91 for a publication that bundles online access, iPhone and iPad apps, or $2.31 a week for one of any of the above.

From now on, some content is allocated specifically as subscriber content and is marked as such with a symbol. This is "premium content written by our journalists specifically for subscribers," the paper said.

"We are boldly going where others have yet to go," said an email from publisher Jim Moroney to staff, published by Mike Orren on his blog. The reason is "straightforward," he continued: "online advertising rates are insufficient at the scale of traffic generated by metro newspaper websites to support the businesses they operate. We need to find additional and meaningful sources of revenue to sustain our profitability as we journey further into the digital marketplace."

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Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2011-03-08 18:45

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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