WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Tue - 02.09.2014


iPad

Apple's iPad has become a beacon of hope in the newspaper industry's quest to monetize content, although skeptics like Rolling Stone co-founder Jann Wenner caution that it may take "decades" before the move becomes profitable. Nevertheless, a few papers in Europe and the US have recently issued iPad applications, hoping to use the digital medium as an opportunity for innovation.

The San Francisco Chronicle introduced its new iPad app this morning. The paper's print edition has been in decline since 2001, but its online readership has grown since the launch of SFGate, making it a major online U.S. paper. The release of the iPad application is another means to reach the paper's consumers who live outside of the Bay Area, the SF Chronicle explained on its site. The app will differentiate itself from SFgate by releasing pictures and videos exclusive to the tablet, as well as interactive links to share content on Twitter and Facebook.

Author

Florence Pichon

Date

2011-05-31 13:45

Playboy used to be a revolutionary magazine, and the publication is once again in the vanguard. Because of Apple's no-nudity policy, Playboy hasn't been able to take its content to the iPad. Now, thanks to HTML5's potential for web apps, it has been able to expand to the tablet.

By launching a web app and selling it itself, Playboy can ignore the restrictions that Apple sets for App Store content. Moreover, it avoids paying Apple 30 percent of subscription revenues and is able to create a relationship with its subscribers directly, which means that it gets an automatic access to customer details.

Because of erotic content, Playboy had no other option but to ditch native app plans, but its application arrives at a time when the web vs. native apps debate is only increasing within the publishing field. Its effort is therefore of interest for those who may wonder about what kind of potential web apps have.

Author

Teemu Henriksson's picture

Teemu Henriksson

Date

2011-05-26 16:01

Two new reports provide valuable information for anyone involved in iPad app or website design. A study by the web usability consultant Jakob Nielsen examined iPad usability, while Miratech, a French user experience consulting firm, looked into the differences between reading on the iPad and a printed newspaper.

Nielsen Norman Group released its first report on iPad app usability a year ago, and the new study compares current apps with the findings of the earlier report. In sum, iPad apps have much improved, but some new usability issues have emerged.

Generally, apps have become more consistent and standardised, the study found. It noted that although many designers seemed to have taken heed of the earlier study's recommendations, some familiar issues were still found.

For example, many websites still feature content that is uncomfortably small to tap. Also the problem of having touchable areas too close together, increasing the risk of tapping the wrong one, still exists in some apps. Accidental activation is particularly annoying if the app lacks an obvious "back" button.

From among new usability issues that were discovered, swipe ambiguity, which occurs when several items on the screen can be swiped, is one of the most prominent ones. When the user swipes at a "wrong" spot, the effect is not what he expects. This can happen when, for example, swiping on a carousel on an app that uses swiping also to change the page.

Author

Teemu Henriksson's picture

Teemu Henriksson

Date

2011-05-24 14:41

iPad is the number one tablet, but its status is being challenged at least on one front: The New York Times reported that the sales of women's magazines on Barnes & Noble's Nook Color e-reader, or even exceed, those on the iPad - to the publishers' surprise.

"We didn't really know what to expect," said Liz Schimel, executive vice president for digital media for Meredith, a publisher several women's magazines. "We regarded it as sort of a test. Would the Nook magazine experience resonate with consumers? We were extremely pleasantly surprised."

Generally, Nook Color and other e-readers seem to be more popular with women than the iPad and other tablet devices. According to Forrester Research, 55 percent of e-reader owners are women, and women also buy more books than men. Many women seem to prefer "simpler" e-readers to multi-purpose tablets. Barnes & Noble clearly noted this, having marketed Nook Color for women in particular.

The device, which is available only in the US and Canada, was launched in November 2010 and has become the most successful product in the company's history. More than 1.5 million magazine subscriptions and copies of single issues have been sold on the Nook Color.

Author

Teemu Henriksson's picture

Teemu Henriksson

Date

2011-05-23 19:06

On May 17 the New York Public Library launched its new iPad app, "Biblion: the Boundless Library".
The app, developed by Potion Design, is free and can be downloaded at the iTunes app store.
The launch issue focuses on the 1939-40 World's Fair.

Surfing through the app, users can "jump from stack to stack, story to story, as you move through the infoscape of the World's Fair, created directly from NYPL's Manuscripts and Archives Division", the Library's site claims.

Each edition of Biblion will open up another of the Library's collections, services, or programs by providing exclusive content in an innovative frame, it announced.

Amongst the things users can do with Biblion, the site explains, are: reading original essays from prominent writers; viewing General Motors' famous Futurama ride, in full color, from the original carousel; exploring the development of the Fair's designs, uniforms and buildings; relishing the outrageous restaurant ideas that never made the cut; and learning about the fate of the Czechoslovakia Pavilion after the country was invaded by Hitler...

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-05-20 16:14

Profitability and finding a sustainable economic way for newspaper in the digital world is probably if the not the main, at least one of the main challenges facing the news industry today.

The whole picture can be seen by different perspectives: how to combine print and digital formats; which approach to follow online - free of charge, relying on advertising or putting content behind a paywall accessible through subscriptions; how to make money from digital devices, such as tablets and smartphones.
Optimists and pessimists bounce the ball between them and the most pessimists even argue that online news will never equal newspapers revenue.

"Can newspapers apps ever make a profit?", wonders Stephen Glover on the Independent. Apart from different subscription packages offered by different newspapers - the Daily Telegraph launched its new paid-for iPad app last week for example - one of the most controversial issues is the relationship between publishers and Apple.

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-05-10 13:48

Ongo, a paid digital news aggregation service backed with $12million in funding from The New York Times Co, The Washington Post Co, and Gannett, aims to offer a premium news reading experience to those who are tired of scouring the web for news. Live since January, it is available online or via an iPad app.

For $6.99 a month, users get access to a selection of stories from The New York Times, all stories from The Associated Press, The Washington Post print edition and USA TODAY, selected content from the Financial Times, Reuters' top stories, plus one additional title from a selection of 25, including The Boston Globe, the Guardian, or Slate. Readers can add on additional publications priced between 99c and $14.99

It is an aggregator that keeps the reader within its site, or app, licensing content from publishers so that it is in control of the user experience. Stories are displayed in an app-like, easy-to-read format, even online, and the personalization functions include a 'My Topics' section allows the reader to customize their own news "playlist," filtered by title, section or keyword. Readers can save stories for later in 'Clippings.'

Who's it for?

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2011-05-06 16:09

The Daily Telegraph launched today an updated version of its iPad app, Financial Times reported. The new edition of The Telegraph for the iPad can be downloaded for a one-off fee of £1.19 or as part of a monthly subscription, priced at £9.99. The previous version of the app, launched last September, was free.

The app's new features include interactive crosswords, picture galleries and a seven-day archive of the paper's cartoons. Also added is the possibility to increase text size by "pinching", a 30-day archive of back issues and a night-reading mode.

The launch follows yesterday's news concerning Apple's deal with Hearst Corp, which saw the iPad manufacturer take a more flexible stance than before as regards its App Store terms. Financial Times's Tech Hub reported that Edward Roussel, The Telegraph's digital editor, described Apple as "co-operative and helpful" during the development of the app.

Author

Teemu Henriksson's picture

Teemu Henriksson

Date

2011-05-06 14:28

After Bloomberg paved the way for making deals with Apple (Business Week was the first business publication to accept Apple's terms over apps subscriptions and signed with the company), the Cupertino giant is moving forward with new deals over iPad subscriptions with other publishers.

Apple's terms have found publishers reluctant to agree on, as Apple stipulated that it would take a 30% share of the subscription price and would refuse to share customer data with publishers, denying them access to statistics that could be very useful in terms of development and advertising.

As Media Post reported, the latest to sign with Apple is Hearst Corp, which has struck a deal to sell digital subscriptions for three titles -- Esquire, Popular Mechanics and O, The Oprah Magazine.

Hearst is the first publisher to sell subscriptions to multiple titles through Apple's iTunes subscription service.

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-05-05 14:13

Yesterday Frédéric Filloux said, "Every media company should be afraid of Flipboard." But Flipboard has promised to work with publishers, and in fact, already is. In December, eight publishers worked with the company to better format their articles. If it's working with media companies, why would Filloux make such a strong statement?

He explained, "Flipboard is THE product any big media company or, better, any group of media companies should have invented."

Flipboard is an iPad application that uses social networking accounts like Facebook and Twitter to build a magazine-like experience. The application takes links that have been posted by your friends and contacts, and presents them in a much more visually appealing article format. Users can click on articles, sending them to the source site in order to read the full story, something competing app, Zite, doesn't too, which led to trouble earlier this month. Flipboard's algorithm notes which topics and friends you pay the most interest to, pushing them to the top. It also displays photos.

Author

Meghan Hartsell

Date

2011-04-18 17:49

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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