WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Wed - 23.04.2014


Infographics

My first instinct upon waking this morning was, “Need newspaper. Now.” And then I remembered that it’s 2012, and that I’m supposed to be a "digital native" millennial-type, so I reached for my iPhone. Without the intermediary of a foot-chilling front stoop, I was then immersed in a torrent of triumphant and cantankerous tweets, a red-and-blue chequered electoral map, and a New York Times video interview with a humbly vindicated blogger.

In the wee hours of November 7, 2012, while nocturnal printers churned out front pages of a beaming Barack, and radio and television airwaves resonated with the sound of his voice, almost every media player in the country (and many beyond) was concurrently converging on another, more instantaneous playing field. News organisations large and small, legacy and start-up, greeted Wednesday with virtual front pages proclaiming Obama’s victory, and promising a clickable cornucopia of elections-related multimedia tempting enough to drive even the most disciplined worker to procrastination. And then there were the memes... 

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-11-07 17:12

5. Memory lane, by ABC News via the Huffington Post

Let’s start from the beginning: Nixon slammed his knee on a car door for the second time, and an aid applied a coat of “lazy shave” to hide his six o’clock shadow. Meanwhile, JFK was changing from a white shirt into a light blue one to avoid glare in his televised image.

September 26, 1960 marked a milestone in political journalism: it was the first time that a pair of U.S. presidential hopefuls had ever faced off before their country for a live, televised debate.

The candidates were John Fitzgerald Kennedy and Richard Millhous Nixon. For American voters, it was an unprecedented opportunity to watch their two presidential candidates duke it out, from the comfort of their homes.

Ten sets of televised debates later, not only do many American voters still tune in from their living rooms, but tens of millions of people around the world stream the action- and participate in the commentary it engenders- from a plethora of devices.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-04 15:36

It may be a competitive time of year for the world’s best swimmers and kayakers, but 10 teams of data visualization experts are approaching the London 2012 Olympic Games as a golden opportunity for collaboration.

The “graphics consortium” is an informal agreement between 10 design teams from eight countries around the world, from Argentina to Oman*, to pool their Olympic graphics.

The brainchild of Matt Martel, Managing Editor, Presentation for Australia’s The Sydney Morning Herald and The Sun-Herald, the idea is for each participating graphics team to both upload and download editable files via OneHub and DropBox, allowing individual teams to tailor one-another’s contributions to suit their needs, whether by changing the typography or the format, and then cross-publish the graphics in their respective publications, on as many platforms as they wish. The swap is free, honour-system-based, and stipulates only that accreditation be offered to the publication that provides the work.

A February 14 email from Martel to his international counterparts outlines the concept:

“Co-operative sharing of graphics for the Olympics (and maybe later on for major world events) seems to have a bit of momentum. From my understanding you are all up for sharing your Olympics work. That means you will upload some of what you do and take work from others. I believe all the publications involved so far are brilliant at information graphics. It's really exciting company to find myself in.”

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-07-27 17:56

Any digital journalist knows that an infographic can tell a thousand words. While stringing a coherent sentence together used to require a great deal of learning in the language of code, this is no longer the case.

Data journalists at publications like the New York Times and the Guardian have, in recent years, elevated interactive graphics and data visualization to an art form. Meanwhile, the proliferation of build-your-own-infographic sites has empowered the rest of us to produce rougher, humbler versions, free of charge.

Tech entrepreneurs HackFwd launched one such site, Infogr.am, in public beta yesterday. The site invites you to log on using Facebook or Twitter, select a template, enter data in an Excel-style worksheet, embellish the automatically-conjured graphic with text, images and quotes, and share your masterpiece through the online channel of your choice.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-05-25 19:20

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