WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Sat - 25.10.2014


HTML5

Jeff Whatcott would say that - after all, he is the Chief Marketing Officer at video hosting giant Brightcove. We were speaking to him on a study tour visit to their HQ in Boston last month.

But of course most news organisations with a strong online presence agree. For example, Kalle Jungkvist - Senior Advisor to Schibsted Media Group and Frenemies Consultant with WAN-IFRA, says "integrated news videos and integrated web TV is more or less a must for a modern news site" (see video below from his interview at DME12).

And the trend is growing fast. Chris Berend, Head of Digital Video Production and Content Development at Bloomberg, says they recently "more than doubled amount of video streams being consumed across web and mobile properties".

More and more news media companies are working with partners like Brightcove to optimise their video content and Jeff was happy to share some of his hints and tips for getting the best from your video strategy, for instance:-

Author

Nick Tjaardstra's picture

Nick Tjaardstra

Date

2012-11-28 17:17

Online newspapers tired of catering to Apple’s in-app purchasing restrictions are starting to bypass the tech giant completely by creating web-based apps using HTML5 technology, Journalism.co.uk reports. The latest title to jump on the trend? Washington’s local paper The Chronicle, which offers the HTML5 app as part of a subscription bundle that includes complete online and print access, the article said.

The Chronicle’s web app is similar to a “native” iPad app in terms of user experience; rather than downloading the app from Apple’s Newsstand, though, one can access the web app through the iPad’s Internet browser and save it as an icon on the homescreen, the article said. App users can share articles through Facebook and Twitter, as well as download stories to read them offline later, the article said.

For the rest of this article please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

Author

Gianna Walton's picture

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-19 11:04

The Financial Times has adopted a bold digital strategy: it refused to tow the line when it came to Apple's policy that takes 30% of sales revenue for sales through the iTunes App Store, instead launching an HTML 5 App which can be downloaded from the paper's own website.

This potentially risky move may well be paying off.

The Pearson Group, that publishes the FT, said that the paper is now receiving over a fifth of its online traffic from mobile devices, such as smartphones and iPads, with a healthy 250,000 digital subscribers across all its subscription packages. According to The Next Web, 100,000 of these subscriptions come from a base of 2000 corporate licences, rather than sales to independent individuals. It was also revealed that the FT Group had recorded overall revenue growth of 6%.

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-11-03 16:59

HTML5 seems to be the answer to a publisher's prayers. Why make several websites when you could make one that will resize and adapt its design depending on the device from which you're accessing the site?

Hearst Corporation has heard the good news and converted; it is re-launching HTML5 versions of all its websites, with the 126 -year-old Good Housekeeping magazine being the first to benefit from the redesign.

Those titles that were acquired in the takeover of the publisher Hachette earlier this year will be first in line for a makeover. It is expected that all the websites across the Hearst Corporation will be re-launched in HTML 5 within 6-18 months.

All the websites will include touch-screen enabled elements, for instance a slide show (also known as a rotator) on the homepage of Good Housekeeping, which is manipulate by a mouse click when accessed via P.C. but is touch operated when accessed via smartphones and tablets.

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-09-15 17:12

OnSwipe launched yesterday its web-publishing service that allows websites and media companies to create an app-like, tablet-friendly way of publishing their content on the Web, GigaOM reported. The startup's publishing platform creates sites that use websites' content but look and behave like native apps. Being based on HTML5, they are situated on the Internet and can be used on any tablet device. Together with the launch, the company announced a number of new partners such as Hearst's Marie Claire, Slate and Forbes.

By now, most major publishers have opted for a native iPad app, but OnSwipe has argued that native apps aren't the ideal approach for publishing content either from the publisher's or reader's point of view. What makes OnSwipe particularly attractive to publishers is the fact that it is not only free but also can provide additional revenue.

Author

Teemu Henriksson's picture

Teemu Henriksson

Date

2011-06-22 19:19

On Monday 6th at Apple's Worldwide Developers Conference in San Francisco Steve Jobs himself presented the company's latest innovations.
Amongst these are iOS 5, the new Apple mobile operating system which brings over 200 new features, iCloud, the new online storage and syncing service for music, photos, files and software, and Newsstand, a virtual bookshelf which organizes magazine and newspapers' app subscription in just one folder.

Probably the most interesting feature from a publisher's point of view is Newsstand. Through this service, iOS 5 organizes users' magazine and newspaper app subscriptions in just one location that lets readers access their favourite publications quickly and easily.

The App Store will have a new place just for newspaper and magazine subscriptions, to which users can go directly from Newsstand. In the same way, new purchases will go directly to the newsstand folder. Then, as new issues become available, Newsstand automatically updates them in the background -- complete with the latest covers.

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-06-07 16:54

Playboy used to be a revolutionary magazine, and the publication is once again in the vanguard. Because of Apple's no-nudity policy, Playboy hasn't been able to take its content to the iPad. Now, thanks to HTML5's potential for web apps, it has been able to expand to the tablet.

By launching a web app and selling it itself, Playboy can ignore the restrictions that Apple sets for App Store content. Moreover, it avoids paying Apple 30 percent of subscription revenues and is able to create a relationship with its subscribers directly, which means that it gets an automatic access to customer details.

Because of erotic content, Playboy had no other option but to ditch native app plans, but its application arrives at a time when the web vs. native apps debate is only increasing within the publishing field. Its effort is therefore of interest for those who may wonder about what kind of potential web apps have.

Author

Teemu Henriksson's picture

Teemu Henriksson

Date

2011-05-26 16:01

As the battle between native and web apps rages on, newspapers and magazines wanting to expand to digital publishing have to make some tough decisions. Fortune seems to have faith in web apps, as the magazine launches today, May 5th, its web app Fortune500+, AdAge reported. At first, the app will run on computers only but will soon work on tablet browsers as well.

The appeal of web apps is easy to understand: unlike native apps, built for a single platform, web apps work cross-platform as they run inside the web browser. Opting for a web app, thus, makes it possible to reach the maximum number of readers with only one version of the app.

AdAge's article notes that the list of web apps is growing, albeit slowly. Although many magazines have chosen to publish exclusively for the iPad, few have so far developed web apps. "I think you'll see that more and more apps will go this way," said Daniel Roth, managing editor at Fortune.com. Despite the slow pace, HTML5 powered web publishing seems to be gathering momentum, the people behind OnSwipe, for example, being very strongly in favour of web apps.

Author

Teemu Henriksson's picture

Teemu Henriksson

Date

2011-05-05 15:58

When the iPad was released a year ago, it was immediately clear that the device offered enormous possibilities for news organisations and publishers in general. With Apple promoting its App Store heavily, it seemed natural to turn to apps as a way of publishing on the iPad. Now, however, as the limitations of that approach are becoming apparent, other options are increasingly discussed.

The buzz around HTML5 has been growing for some time now. Jason Baptiste, CEO of OnSwipe, is one of the advocates of HTML5: in a recent interview with GigaOM, Baptiste noted that HTML5 makes it possible to create web pages that are up to par with native apps in terms of visual appearance and user interface.

Publishing content on the Internet, instead of developing dedicated apps, Baptiste said, would solve one of the main issues publishers have with the current tablet market: to make their publications accessible with all of the devices out there, they have to develop a version for each of the platforms available. All tablet devices naturally have adequate web-browsing capabilities, making HTML5 content free of compatibility issues.

Author

Teemu Henriksson's picture

Teemu Henriksson

Date

2011-05-03 16:29

Could the best way to launch a new news product be to ignore the web and go mobile first? This is the strategy that French media consultant Frédéric Filloux advocates: a paid-for, mobile-based service supplemented with a weekly magazine that would be included in the price of the subscription.

Currently, the standard formula used by those launching new news brands is to build a free, advertising-supported website, with the aim of spreading content wide enough to make some money. Filloux believes that this model is over: unless you can generate a vast audience, classical web advertising can no longer generate enough income.

Particularly for business news, Filloux says that paid-for mobile news makes sense for business people as they are constantly on the move, as speed matters and they like being first to know, and as they are likely to appreciate the feeling of exclusivity that comes with having news that isn't on the web.

The offering should push content to the reader, allowing the consumer to customize when they want it delivered. And it should be available across all mobile platforms: iPhone, iPad, Android and Blackberry. Filloux suggests going via Apple's iTunes system at first, but once reliable development tools for HTML5 are available, he recommends switching to a mobile site based on this.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2011-03-07 13:27

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