WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Sat - 02.08.2014


Google

Take a look at this disingenuous Huffington Post "article" and everything becomes clear. As the infinite accessibility of free online news pushes some newspaper companies towards the edge of existence, the Huffington Post's arguably desperate tactics reveal a glimpse into one method of survival.

Author

Paul Hoffman

Date

2011-02-11 17:41

Krishna Bharat, the founder and engineering head of Google News, recently said that the computer-generated aggregated news site is expanding its customization options for non-English readers, the Japan Times Online reported.

The article reported Bharat said in an interview he expects the site's news personalization and other features to become more widely available for non-English readers, including Japanese, sometimes this year.

"Google currently offers more extensive options for English readers to personalize their news site by enabling them to create sections that cluster together stories closely matching their interests", Japan Times underlined.

Google News was created by Bharat in 2002 with the intention to allow readers find news from different sources, not just Western media but from all over the world.

The site now has 72 editions in 30 languages and currently draws news from more than 50,000 sources, "ranking them according to the company's algorithm, which checks factors such as originality and timeliness of the story, the number of citations, quality of the source and other signals that determine overall quality", the article reported.

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-01-26 14:04

Google has "new efforts underway to continue to improve our search quality," according to the Google blog. A post by principal engineer Matt Cutts, published last week, responded to stories questioning Google's search quality by explaining what the company has been doing to beat spam.

A "redesigned document-level classifier" should make it harder for on-page spam to rank highly, Cutts said, specifying that the classifer is better at detecting spam such as repeated spammy words on individual web pages. These are "the sort of phrases you tend to see in junky, automated, self-promoting blog comments."

Google is also working on a change to its algorithm that would target sites that copy others' content and have low levels of original content.

Growing concerns about 'content farms' and their prowess at appearing high in search engine results prompted Cutts to affirm that "we can and should do better," although he noted that Google had launched two "major" algorithmic changes focused on low-quality sites in 2010.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2011-01-25 12:59

News Corporation's eagerly anticipated and widely publicized The Daily, the first ever iPad-only newspaper, was supposed to launch January 19, but has been pushed back "weeks," according to All Things Digital's Peter Kafka. The delayed debut is rumored to be a result of Apple's need to fix its subscription service, which would allow readers to make in-app purchases for a week's or month's worth of The Daily via iTunes for an estimated $1 per week.

Apple has strict control over all applications released on its devices. If such delays and other issues continue, will publishers remain cooperative?

The iPad, launched April 3, 2010, has taken the tablet market by storm, and has yet again reinvigorated Apple's reputation, not to mention its revenue.

Author

Paul Hoffman

Date

2011-01-21 16:01

"Twitter has analyzed the 25 billion tweets sent in 2010 and published the list of top overall trends in the year behind us," Mashable reported, "as well as the top 10 trending topics in eight categories: news events, people, movies, television, technology, World Cup, sports and hashtags."

The 10 overall top trends are: Gulf Oil Spill, FIFA World Cup, Inception, Haiti Earthquake, Vuvuzela, Apple iPad, Google Android, Justin Bieber, Harry Potter & the Deathly Hallows, Pulpo Paul. Vuvuzela, the plastic horn used during the football match in South Africa, and Paul the Octopus, used to predict the winner of matches, refer both to the FIFA World Cup.

The Gulf Oil Spill and the Haiti Earthquake are at the top of the news events list, followed by Pakistan Floods, Koreas Conflict, Chilean Miners Rescue, Chavez Tas Ponchao, Wikileaks Cablegate, Hurrican Earl, Prince William's Engagement and World Aids Day.

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2010-12-15 17:41

Last week, Google announced that it had created new metatags for Google News that would help identify original stories and consequently, which publication got the scoop. The initiative aims to tackle the fact that hundreds of articles will often appear based around one story, and seeks to credit original stories with higher rankings in Google News search results. This change in ranking won't happen immediately: Google first wants to gather enough data to test the method's effectiveness.

The two tags are 'syndication-source,' which publishers should use to indicated the preferred URL for a syndicated article and 'original-source' which should indicate the URL of the first article to report on this story.

With regards to the latter, the Google blog explains, "We encourage publishers to use this metatag to give credit to the source that broke the story. We recognize that this can sometimes be tough to determine. But the intent of this tag is to reward hard work and journalistic enterprise."

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-11-22 13:23

Google Inc has given $2 million to the Knight Foundation, it was announced yesterday, and the search giant has said it will invest $3 million more in journalism projects outside the US, "through a similar partnership." More details will be available early next year, according to a post on Google's blog by Nikesh Arora, President, Global Sales Operations and Business Development.

The money to the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation is intended to support the foundation's digital media innovation work, and half will go to the Knight News Challenge, while the remaining $1 million will to other grants around news innovation which will be announced later.

The Knight Foundation quoted Arora as saying that "Journalism is fundamental to a functioning democracy, and we want to do our part to help fulfill the promise of journalism in the digital age. There is no better partner to support innovation and experimentation in digital journalism than Knight Foundation."

"We're eager to play our part on the technology side," Arora said on the Google Blog, highlighting the new ways to present news online and the tools that Google has developed.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-10-27 12:22

Business executives in Europe are increasingly getting their news from Internet, according to the latest Business Elite Europe survey from Ipsos MediaCT, Journalism.co.uk reported. And Google News is the most popular destination.

Although 95 percent of the senior business executives read newspapers everyday, 72 percent said they also visit websites on a monthly basis to get information. This represents a 63 percent increase since 2008, MarketingWeek revealed.

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-10-22 10:30

Is the relationship between Google and newspapers helpful or competitive? Find out here at imna.org.

The Dead Sea Scrolls
are going to be digitalized and put online, according to the Washington Post. "The Israel Antiquities Authority and Google announced Tuesday that they are collaborating to produce digitized images of the entire collection of the Dead Sea Scrolls and put them on the Internet, making the archaeological treasure available to anyone with the click of a mouse," reports the article.

Author

Heather Holm

Date

2010-10-21 18:29

A rather harmonic picture of the collaboration between publishers and and the world's biggest search engine was painted by Google's strategic partner development manager, Madhav Chinnappa, at the World Editors Forum in Hamburg on Friday. "Everything is in the control of the publisher," Chinnappa said, and "I think you should take my appointment as a good sign."

The expectations with Google are so high, he added, that there is a tendency for people to focus on the negative. "You have to focus on the positive part of collaboration," he believes. Tools like Google's Living Stories are experiments and "they may not be perfect right now. But they're an attempt to stimulate," he said.

Living Stories was originally developed in conjunction with The New York Times and the Washington Post. It collects all the coverage of an ongoing story on a single URL, and articles in the story are listed in date order starting with the newest at the top. Readers can view the story through text, graphics, timelines or quotes.

Author

Kathrin Streckenbach

Date

2010-10-11 13:48

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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