WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Sat - 02.08.2014


Google

Google and the French government have come to an agreement that will see Google creating a €60m Digital Publishing Innovation Fund to support “transformative digital publishing initiatives” and to deepen partnerships between Google and French publishers to help increase the latter’s online revenue using Google’s advertising technology.

The two parties have been involved in negotiations for three months after the French press demanded that Google pay for linking to news content so abundantly via its search engine. Google refused, arguing that it sends a vast amount of traffic to news sites via the links in question. French president François Hollande had set a deadline of 31 January to resolve the issue, promising to introduce a legislation to tax Google if negotiations were not successful.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2013-02-04 18:23

Last week, The Washington Post launched a new nightly video news show called The Fold, created primarily for Google TV and Android tablet devices but also available online.

“We’re not a newspaper, we’re not the evening news, we’d better not be a web video but we’re some combination of all those things that hopefully is informative and fun to watch,” says presenter Brook Silva-Braga in an introductory video.

It is a half hour show, shot from a studio within The Post’s newsroom, accompanied by footage from out in the streets and around the world. The first episode featured an interview with Henry Kissinger; subsequent guests include Economist Mark Zandi and former congressman Patrick Kennedy.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-10-10 17:24

Through a rights management company called Copiepresse, which took on Google in a court case and won, Belgian newspapers have succeeded in preventing others from exploiting their content without providing financial compensation.

Margaret Boribon, the Secretary General of Copiepresse, calls it protecting the “fair value chain in the digital world.”

“Every content producer should receive fair remuneration for their efforts. It’s a very simple principle,” she says.

And while some publishers see Google as a collaborator, protecting content revenue is essential, Ms Boribon says.

“In the 20th century, there were two pillars of revenues for the press – circulation and advertising. In the 21st century, a third pillar is needed – licensing the re-use of newspaper content,” she says.

Copiepresse does not object to individuals sharing information. What it does object to is what Ms Boribon called “systematic and professional piracy.”

When Google announced it intended to establish a Google News in Belgium in 2006, Copiepresse put it on notice that it objected to the inclusion of its members' content without payment. When Google ignored the notice, Copiepresse sued.

Six years later – after failed negotiations, retaliation (Google removed Belgian newspapers from Search as well as Google News, restoring it only under threat of lawsuit) and appeals, Copiepresse won its case. Google has one more appeal, with an ultimate decision expected in 2013.

Author

Larry Kilman's picture

Larry Kilman

Date

2012-05-10 13:27

Google+ has come in for a lot of flack. It’s been called a “ghost town” by various news organisations and one viral image explaining social networks through the medium of donuts (of all things!) implied that while every other social platform serves a obvious purpose, the only people using Google+ were Google+ employees.

Speaking at the Social Media World Forum in London yesterday, Chris Brogan, president of Human Business Works and author of Google Plus for Business, makes the case that businesses – and by extension publishers – should be thinking about Google+.

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-28 10:11

Google is significantly changing its search formula in a way that could have an impact on millions of websites, reported the Wall Street Journal. Rather than essentially searching for keywords, the company hopes to incorporate ‘semantic search’ to provide more relevant results, meaning more facts and direct answers to queries at the top of the search-results page, the WSJ said.

It is a process which will take years, the WSJ learnt from Amit Singhal, a Google search executive, but other sources said that some changes will show up sooner. As an example, the WSJ explained that:

“Under the shift, people who search for "Lake Tahoe" will see key "attributes" that the search engine knows about the lake, such as its location, altitude, average temperature or salt content. In contrast, those who search for "Lake Tahoe" today would get only links to the lake's visitor bureau website, its dedicated page on Wikipedia.com, and a link to a relevant map.”

Google will start to provide actual answers to questions, the paper said, both from its own database and from other websites, using the semantic search technology.

The new developments are intended to help Google maintain its lead over rivals such as Microsoft’s Bing and Apple’s Siri, the WSJ said, and to entice people to stay longer on the site.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-03-15 19:26

As everyone from businesses to governments to individuals go digital, the amount of raw data being recorded and stored is growing at a dizzying rate. Often this data contains useful information that it is in the public interest to analyse, but it exists in a format that very few people can understand. The solution to the problem? Find experts who can convert large amounts of data into easily accessible stories. In other words, find data journalists.

These are some of the ideas fuelling Danish daily Dagbladet Information's new initiative, Nordisk Nyhedshacker 2012 ("Nordic News Hacker 2012"). The project, run in collaboration with The Guardian, Google and Syddansk Universitet's Center for Journalism, invites journalists or data experts to create a piece of data journalism - which could be anything from a data mash-up to a new mobile app - and submit it to a panel of judges. The creator of the winning entry will be given a $20,000 scholarship by Google and will be invited to work with the Guardian Data Blog in London for one month. The Center for Journalism contributes by advertising the competition and incorporating elements of data journalism into its curriculum.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-22 17:20

Google+ brand pages are now live - that's right, that means that your business and brand now has official permission from Google to use its social network.

Previously, Google took the somewhat controversial move to ask brands to stop creating profiles. Google wanted brands to have pages - not profiles - because otherwise that interrupted its system of real-name-only users .

Now, however, brand pages are fully operational and you can see the shiny new promotional video on Mashable's website.

Despite calls that Google+ is dead - having missed the opportunity to capitalise on the initial furore surrounding its launch by slowly adding features, like brand pages, when Facebook already has a fully operational infrastructure - many brands, including WAN-IFRA, have jumped on the opportunity to gain exposure on another social media platform. FC Barcelona, Burberry, Fox News all have pages - but the question is has public interest in Google + waned irrevocably? Will the pages be used?

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-11-09 17:27

The number of new Internet users in China in the past three years exceeded more than the total number of Internet users in the USA today: that's a lot of people.

Despite this enormous amount of Internet users, the Chinese government has resolved to further increase online censorship. 39 firms have agreed to cooperate with this latest attempt to "curb rumours" and prevent the "spreading of harmful information", according to the BBC - including Baidu, a popular search engine, and Alibaba.

Google pulled out of mainland China in favour of Hong Kong during March 2010 due its objections to Internet censorship. Exercising this online control is now the job of the State Internet Information Office that was created in the same year.

According to the BBC: "Miao Wei, minister of Industry and Information Technology, called upon internet companies to strengthen their research and development to ensure better censorship of content."

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-11-07 17:32

Television news broadcaster Ted Koppel prompted an interesting discussion at the Zeitgeist Google conference in LA - should Google manipulate the news content readers see?

A senior editor of The New Yorker, Nicholas Thompson, then posed the question: should Google alter its algorithms to show people the news the serious news they 'should' see instead of the entertainment news they might want to read?

Actually, in a sense they are already doing so: Larry Page, Google CEO, told the conference that Google had a responsibility to improve the media. Something which, many would argue, they already do.

Although the company clearly states that its algorithms do not exercise editorial control, Google's algorithms do edit some of the content readers see. Tagged content is placed differently within the search results, usually prioritised by labels such as the new 'standout' tag.

Google also makes an effort to reduce the content its readers see from content farms and other sites that simply recycle press releases, as GigaOm explains. So, in many ways, Google already manipulates the selection content its users will view.

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-09-30 14:09

Google+ is once a gain a hot topic in the tech world, having unveiled more than 100 features and - finally - opened its doors to everyone, not merely the technocratic few.

Google was back where is wanted to be - at the centre of attention - once more. But only for about 20 minutes.

Facebook is not prepared to give Google a share of the limelight and will parry these blows with some PR of their own. There have been hints, tit-bits and even solid evidence of Facebook being on the verge of releasing a plethora of new features, such as social media and content sharing, a drastic profile redesign and a mobile photo-sharing app . These developments will obviously be officially revealed at the Facebook developers' conference F8 on Thursday 22 September.

No wonder that Google have had trouble holding on to the headlines.

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-09-21 18:56

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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