WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Fri - 24.10.2014


freedom of speech

The US State Department has warned journalists that going into Libya is extremely hazardous, as those reporters who have already entered the country illegally are now being considered Al Qaida collaborators by the government and will be arrested if caught.

Libyan Government officials told US diplomats that some members of CNN, BBC Arabic and Al Arabiya would be allowed into the country to report on the situation. They would apparently be escorted, according to the New York Times, and an additional concern is that they would be used as human shields.
The Libyan government insists that journalists have been exaggerating the number of deaths and intends to show reporters its side of the story.

Many journalists, including some from the Guardian and ITV News, have entered Libya this week for the first time in 40 years, the Guardian reported. Most reached the country via its eastern border with Egypt. As the east of the country has fallen into opposition hands, most journalists are based there. For their safety, their exact locations are not being made public.

The Guardian reported yesterday that the country's capital, Tripoli, still remains largely closed off to foreign media.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2011-02-25 14:07

Freedom of speech is a basic principle on which democracy depends. But the right to say anything you want can teeter-totter between a sharp nod of agreement from some--with the underlying hope that people will use their best judgment in paying it heed or not--and a slow, quizzical shake of the head from others that suggests "I'd like to say yes, but ... some things are better left unsaid."

NPR is of both minds, and currently struggling to strike the balance. To serve a broader interpretation of the U.S.'s first amendment, the radio news organisation is allowing more liberal use of language and tone on its Facebook page. American Journalism Review writes that in this forum, conversations tend to be more casual and offhand than on the official website. Rather than adhering to polite dialogue in the comment thread, "our Facebook users are snarky and swear like sailors" says Andy Carvin, NPR's senior strategist.

Author

Ashley Stepanek

Date

2011-02-23 15:54

Against a backdrop of historic political change for the region that has brought the country to the brink of its own revolution, The International Partnership for Yemen today releases findings from its joint mission that expose the critical situation facing the media.

The Partnership, a coalition of press freedom and human rights organisations including ARTICLE 19: Global Campaign for Free Expression, The International Federation of Journalists (IFJ), International Media Support (IMS), and The World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers (WAN-IFRA), visited Yemen in a week-long advocacy mission in November 2010.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2011-02-22 18:16

Already saddled with an over-active reputation for "libel tourism," the U.K. is now also wrestling with its own domestic issue on the subject: whether suspects in a crime should be named in the media before they are proven guilty in a court of law.

This comes on the coattails of a murder case in the U.K. in which Chris Jeffries, identified by The Daily Mail as a "nutty professor with a blue rinse," was named aggressively throughout British media as being the main suspect with strong suggestion that he was the actual killer.

Why the strong suggestion? Mainly, it seems, because he's a weirdo.

The Independent quotes "strange ... lewd ... creepy ... Peeping Tom ... obsessed by death" as "just some of the words used by the populist press to describe Chris Jefferies." While Jeffries was arrested late last year in connection to the murder of his tenant, Joanna Yeates, he was released without charge, and another individual has since been charged.

Author

Ashley Stepanek

Date

2011-02-02 14:08

Inspired by the NPR/Juan Williams case, Kelly McBride analyses on Poynter the need for news organizations to review their code of ethics in the light of modernization the news world is facing.

"Buried in last week's announcement was news that the public radio company is reviewing its code of ethics. If newsroom leaders around the country honestly assessed their own operations, they'd find that most of them have out-dated, unclear ethics policies, which they apply inconsistently. That is, those with policies", she wrote.

Last October, Juan Williams, senior news analyst at NPR, was dismissed for having said on Fox News Channel that, even if it is wrong to brand all Muslims as terrorists, he gets nervous when he sees someone in "Muslim garb" on an airplane, as NPR reported. NPR said the comment was just the most recent in a series of things Williams has said while offering commentary on Fox that violated NPR's standards because they venture into the realm of opinion rather than analysis.

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-01-12 17:44

The European Newspaper Publishers' Association (ENPA) and the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers (WAN-IFRA), have expressed concern at a draft law in Hungary that would impose extensive fines against journalists and publishers if they refuse to disclose their sources or publish information deemed inappropriate by the government.

The proposed law, if passed, would seriously endanger freedom of the press by creating room for a subjective judgment about any individual news story and penalise publishers and editors through government-controlled regulatory bodies. The proposal could dramatically limit objective news media.
"We are deeply concerned that this law poses a serious threat to freedom of the press and would, in particular, have a significant negative impact on investigative journalism," ENPA and WAN-IFRA said in a letter to Prime Minister Viktor Orbán.

The international press organisations called on the government to urgently revise the current package of draft legislation to ensure that it serves its proper function of enhancing Hungarian democracy.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-12-13 17:12

Liu Xiaobo, a poet and literary critic, is the recipient of the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize. China has forbidden him to travel to the award ceremony, which will be held on Friday in Oslo. This poem was translated by Jeffrey Yang from the Chinese.

From "Experiencing Death"

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-12-10 19:08

The fallout from the latest WikiLeaks release continues, with new details being released daily and new battles between hackers supporting WikiLeaks and those who are attempting to stifle the site financially.

The Guardian, one of the papers that received prior access to the material, has taken a thorough look at reactions in the countries where papers received direct access to the WikiLeaks cables:

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-12-10 14:08

Agence France-Presse reported today that China has blocked the news websites of BBC, CNN, and Norwegian state broadcaster, NRK, ahead of tomorrow's Nobel Peace Prize ceremony for Liu Xiaobo, author of the highly controversial manifesto, Charter 08.

After publishing his revolutionary manifesto on December 10, 2008, on the 60th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Liu's call for "freedom, equality, human rights...[and] democracy, republicanism, and constitutional government" led him to an 11-year prison sentence on December 25, 2009 for "inciting subversion of state power".

While serving this prison sentence, Liu, on October 8, 2010, won the Nobel Peace Prize. Enraged, the Chinese foreign ministry responded in a statement, "Liu Xiaobo is a criminal who has been sentenced by Chinese judicial departments for violating Chinese law" and that awarding him this prize "runs completely counter to the principle of the prize and is also a blasphemy to the peace prize".

Author

Paul Hoffman

Date

2010-12-09 18:45

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