WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Sun - 31.08.2014


France

A final, decisive vote on the bill – which would also legalize adoption by gay couples – is expected to take place on Tuesday. The French government is calling it the biggest social reform since the abolition of the death penalty in 1981.

On Wednesday, the AFP reported two journalists from its partner channel LCP-Assemblée Nationale were attacked and their equipment was destroyed while they covered a massive protest in Paris. The broadcaster added that LCP would be filing a complaint.

Several other incidents involving attacks on journalists have been reported within the past six months.

In November, Caroline Fourest was beaten along with feminist group FEMEN. Fourest, a well-known feminist journalist, reported evidence of “anti-journalist” slogans at the protest. Around that time, Les Sociétés de Journalists (SDJ) denounced the treatment of journalists, saying:

"The reporters--all media combined--present on site were able to see the poisonous atmosphere that prevailed among the protesters against journalists. Insults, spitting, obstructing, sometimes even physical abuse. It is not an isolated element but a general atmosphere hostile to journalists. This climate is reminiscent of what many journalists had found and denounced at the last presidential campaign. "

Author

Briana Seftel

Date

2013-04-19 15:18

In an interview with Le Monde Nicolas Beytout, former editor of Le Figaro and Les Echoes, says his paper will “make information and analysis, defend and confront opinions, create a product that has a precise editorial policy.”

Judging from the title, the paper will be partisan. “What is weak or neutral is struggling to emerge from the mass of information,” Beytout told Le Monde.

With a shaky press industry in France, Beytout is certain digital/print model will be successful. In the interview he put a strong focus on the digital aspect, describing the news outlet as "a digital media, with a print extension." However, he is clear that he believes digital-only wouldn't be successful from a financial point of view.

“My idea is to marry the internet, its innovation, its audience…with the power of paper. A media brand must have two legs, Internet and the paper. I cannot make this project work by doing this project differently to others.”

Author

Briana Seftel

Date

2013-04-09 13:01

Nougayrède is 46 years-old, speaks fluent English, and started her career in journalism as a freelancer for another national French daily, Libération, Radio France International and the BBC’s French service. She joined Le Monde in 1997 and has worked in Georgia, Azerbaidjan, Ukraine, Russia and Kosovo.

In 2005 she received the prestigious Albert Londres Prize and the French Diplomatic Press Prize for her coverage of the Beslan hostage crisis and the Chechen conflict. She has been Le Monde’s diplomatic correspondent since 2005.

Unusually for a new director, Nougayrède has never had management responsibilities. She was seen as an outsider in the contest to take the position freed by the sudden death of former director Erik Izraelewicz in November.

With almost 80 percent of the votes of the paper's general assembly, which consists of journalists from print and online versions of Le Monde, and of the magazine M, Nougayrède seems a popular choice. It will be interesting to see how the afternoon paper, which still has separate print and web operations, evolves under her leadership.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2013-03-04 16:04

Google and the French government have come to an agreement that will see Google creating a €60m Digital Publishing Innovation Fund to support “transformative digital publishing initiatives” and to deepen partnerships between Google and French publishers to help increase the latter’s online revenue using Google’s advertising technology.

The two parties have been involved in negotiations for three months after the French press demanded that Google pay for linking to news content so abundantly via its search engine. Google refused, arguing that it sends a vast amount of traffic to news sites via the links in question. French president François Hollande had set a deadline of 31 January to resolve the issue, promising to introduce a legislation to tax Google if negotiations were not successful.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2013-02-04 18:23

Google has extended a warning to France’s news publishers: quit trying to make us pay a tax on the snippets of your content displayed by Google News, or you will soon find yourselves un-Google-able. The word may sound like gobbledygook, but the danger is real: the exclusion of the country’s media from the search giant’s results is a worrisome prospect.

Google addressed its warning in the form of a letter to several French ministries earlier this month, AFP revealed yesterday. “I’m a bit surprised by the tone of this correspondence, which sounds like a threat,” replied Culture Minister Aurelie Filippetti. “You don’t deal with a democratically-elected government by making threats.”

Two groups of France’s news publishers, who consider themselves insufficiently compensated for the traffic generated on Google News by bits of their own content, have been looking for a way to share in Google’s advertising revenues since the spring, according to Le Figaro.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-19 18:33

French aggregation startup Youmag is seeking to integrate free and paid digital news content in a made-to-measure, virtual magazine format.

Co-founders Antoine Levêque, Nicolas Schaettel and Guillaume Multrier have recently unveiled versions for the web and Android, and Youmag’s free iPhone and iPad apps, launched this past June, were downloaded over 100,000 times in two months.

The concept is simple: personalised aggregation + curation and editorial intervention by a small team of journalists + a freemium model akin to that of music streaming platform Spotify = ideally, a successful company that generates 2/3 of its revenue from advertising, and 1/3 from happy readers inclined to pay for premium content (thereby making publishers happy, too).

Personalised, nuanced aggregation

Let’s say that you are the user. After logging in for the first time, you are invited to select the sections of your magazine from a carousel of themes and sub-themes.

“What really distinguishes us is the thematic approach,” Levêque told me in a phone interview last week. The selection of sub-themes is diverse and nuanced as possible "to be as relevant as possible for users," elaborated Schaettel in a subsequent conversation.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-09 12:05

Following its last highly controversial issue which featured cartoons depicting the Prophet Muhammed, satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo has printed two editions this week, one "responsible" and one "irresponsible." Last week’s cartoons mocked the explosive reaction to the film "The Innocence of Muslims" by parodying a popular French film, "Untouchables," and portrayed Muhammad in a series of poses, in one of which he is naked.

In addition to the standard issue, this week’s "responsible" edition of Charlie Hebdo contains no pictures and very little text – the clear message being that to be "responsible" is extremely limiting and does not actually mean doing real journalism. Aside from an editorial from Stéphane Charbonnier, or Charb, the weekly’s publisher, the paper only contains headlines and blank spaces. The ironic headlines include “Tunisia – all is well,” “Morocco – all is well,” “Egypt – all is well” and “Libya – all is well,” following by “Mali – all is going very well.” Others include “Prudence is the mother of safety” and “Do you know how to plant cabbages?”

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-09-26 16:32

This week’s edition of French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo sold out almost immediately Wednesday morning after it once again printed cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad, raising fears of hostile reactions and launching a debate about the balance between freedom of expression and journalistic responsibility at a time of acute tension in the Islamic world.

“To calm things down after the film ‘The Innocence of Muslims,’ Charlie would like to announce… the publication of ‘Untouchable 2,’” proclaimed a post on the magazine’s Facebook page last night, making light of the deadly unrest that has torn through the Muslim world, claiming the lives of over 30 people, after excerpts from an amateurish video mocking Islam were broadcast on YouTube on September 11.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-09-19 18:43

Another week, another royal photo scandal. The Duchess of Cambridge is the latest member of the British royal family to be captured in a compromising position. Topless photos of the duchess on holiday in the south of France with her husband Prince William were splashed across the cover of the French edition of Closer.

The couple are said to be both saddened and angered by the gossip magazine’s decision to publish the photos (seemingly taken with a long-lens camera) and the palace has issues a strongly worded statement comparing the intrusion to the press’s harassment of the late Princess of Wales.

Responding to what she called a “disproportionate reaction” to the images, French Closer’s editor in chief Laurence Pieau insisted that there was “nothing shocking” about the photos, which she describes as a “joyous” celebration of an attractive young couple in love. Pieau then dismisses the complaints of the British press as hypocritical, as certain sections of it published naked photos of the third in line to the throne barely two weeks ago.

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-14 18:44

An ethics debate seized the French media on Monday, after national television network TF1 broadcast on Sunday evening extracts from a leaked recording of conversations between police and Mohamed Merah, the 23 year-old Toulouse native with links to Al Qaeda who confessed to the murder of seven people in March 2012.

The audio clips were recorded during the 32-hour standoff between Merah and France’s elite Raid squad as police negotiated to bring the armed man out of his Toulouse apartment alive. The standoff ended when police shot Merah dead as he jumped out the window of his flat, guns blazing. Clips from the recording reveal Merah saying that he “loved death more than they [the police] loved life” and that he “was ready for all the tactics negotiators would try.”

Merah also spoke of wanting to carry out more attacks like the ones he had already admitted to: the shooting of three soldiers in Montauban, which he said was motivated by their engagement in Afghanistan, and the murder of a rabbi and three children at a Jewish school in Toulouse, which he said had not been premeditated.

The killer had filmed himself carrying out these acts, and the footage appeared on a USB stick at Al Jazeera’s Paris bureau soon afterward. The network decided not to air the graphic material. France’s other major television news channels stated that they, too, would refuse to run the footage if given the chance.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-07-09 18:21

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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