WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Sat - 01.11.2014


Financial Times

The Telegraph

Earlier this month The Telegraph announced intentions to cut 80 positions as the newspaper moved to share resources with its Sunday operation, The Guardian reported. These layoffs signify a 14 percent reduction in staff, which previously consisted of 550 editorial workers. The redundancies will be met with 50 new “digitally-focused” jobs, resulting in a net loss of about 5 percent. Most of the job losses will come from The Sunday Telegraph rather than the weekday operation.

Chief Executive Murdoch MacLennan said the merger shows the newspaper’s digital-first ambitions, solidified with an £8 million investment “to complete our transition to a digital business,” according to The Guardian.

The Independent

In February Managing Director Andrew Mullins declared the Levedev titles’ intentions “to become one of the very first truly integrated multimedia companies, publishing continuously on print, TV and other digital platforms.” He said that its soon-to-be-launched local TV channel London Live will share journalistic resources with other titles, according to MediaGuardian.

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-03-26 14:06

The Financial Times is adopting a digital first approach, as detailed yesterday in a memo from editor-in-chief Lionel Barber to staff, published in the Guardian. “We need to ensure that we are serving a digital platform first, and a newspaper second,” Barber wrote, inspired by a visit to Silicon Valley last year which, for him, “confirmed the speed of change.”

The memo focused on the importance of proactively adapting to the new digital age, at a time when 25% of the FT’s online traffic now comes from mobile. The FT will be launching new digital products and services, Barber said, such as a new Weekend FT app and “Fast FT” for markets.

A key aspect of the changes is reducing the cost of producing a newspaper and subsequently increasing investments online. Some resources will be shifted from print to digital, and journalists will be trained “to operate to the best of their abilities,” Barber wrote. The paper is about to launch a voluntary redundancy scheme in an attempt to reduce costs by £1.6m this year. It plans to lose 35 of its current staff, while introducing 10 more digital jobs.

“We need to become content editors rather than page editors,” he said, emphasizing this essential change in mindset, while calling for all to “think harder about a more dynamic and inter-active form of FT journalism beyond the printed word.” It will be a "big cultural shift," he believes.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2013-01-22 19:28

A £1bn sale of the Financial Times is under active consideration, Bloomberg said today – only for the story to be immediately denied by its owner. 

Pearson, the FTSE 100 media group, issued a statement in response to the article saying that, though ‘not in the habit of responding to rumours, speculation or reports about our portfolio’, it was obliged to point out that ‘this particular Bloomberg story is wrong.’ Dame Majorie Scardino, the outgoing chief executive of Pearson, once said famously that the FT would be sold ‘over my dead body’ but her impending departure from the company in January lends added credence to the report, as does the fact that the story comes just weeks after Pearson agreed to merge Penguin with Bertelsmann’s Random House in a deal to create the largest book publisher in the US and the UK. 

Author

Frederick Alliott's picture

Frederick Alliott

Date

2012-11-07 17:46

Know your customer, wherever they are, and use that knowledge, advised Stephen Pinches, Group Product Manager for Mobile & Emerging Platforms at the Financial Times, at the 5th Tablet & App Summit last week in Frankfurt. This philosophy is why the paper decided to build its own web-based app for the iPad rather than be part of Apple’s Newsstand: because as well as taking a 30% cut of subscription revenue, Apple does not provide publishers with subscriber data.

Within six weeks of Apple’s demand that publishers offer the same subscription deals through iTunes as they do on their own site, the FT rebuilt its native app as a web app. “It has all the things you would expect from a native app,” Pinches said, but “it allows us to enact whatever business model we choose.”

“We believe that data is fundamental to build our model,” he said, and gave personalized content as an example of how to strengthen relations with readers and offer a better service. “If you are a CEO of a media company we can tell you what other CEOs at media companies are reading.”

For Android devices, the FT took the HTML5 web app and “wrapped it in a little code” to put in the Google store. The paper has already launched a Windows 8 app too.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-11-05 13:04

The New York Times is planning to further extend its international reach and tap into the promising Brazilian advertising market by launching a Portuguese-language website in the second half of next year.

The revelation follows a similar move by the Financial Times, which opened a newspaper printing plant in São Paulo earlier this month, and is taking strides to expand its Latin American web presence with a tailored homepage and mobile app.

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-17 15:51

The Financial Times is to launch a "live news desk," reported Journalism.co.uk. It will provide rapid responses to breaking news stories on the paper's website, including on live blogs, and make use of Twitter, said Ben Fenton, who will lead the desk, on his blog.

The live news desk will cover world events and business news from around the world, wrote Fenton, who until now has been the FT's media correspondent. He will lead a team of reporters focused on the project, according to Journalism.co.uk.

The plan to create the desk has been in the works for some time, it appears, and Fenton said that it had been intended to launch in 2011 but due to the "extraordinary" events of last year it was delayed.

At a time when news is broken almost in real time on social networks as well as on news wires, newspapers are adapting to meet the challenges of a faster-paced news cycle, trying to balance speed and depth.

The aim of the FT's new desk is to get a first version of a story online quicker, Journalism.co.uk said, freeing up specialized reporters to develop longer, more in-depth pieces. If it works, will it be a step that other news organisations will take?

Source: Journalism.co.uk, Keepbloggeringon

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-03-05 18:07

"Thank God we've moved away from the time when you think you can just put television online," said David Hayward, head of the journalism programme at the BBC College of Journalism, opening a session on online video at news:rewired in London on Friday.

John Domokos, video producer at the Guardian, elaborated on this sentiment, explaining that a newspaper can't hope to beat TV for the polished version of a story, thoroughly edited with a highly-structured narrative, so it is better to focus on what it can do that is different and complementary. He often adopts a "microcosm" approach, aiming to create a three or four minute film that gives viewers a window onto a specific world.

This works particularly well with stories that focus on a community, he explained, such as the Birmingham riots in the UK last summer. It's easier to gain the community's trust if you are just one man with a camera, rather than a whole TV crew, he said, and if you can get close to the characters you don't need too much movement and visual drama to create something compelling.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-02-06 17:46

Whether or not regulatory reform of the press is necessary has been on the agenda today at the Leveson inquiry, the public inquiry on the role of the press and the police in the wave of the phone-hacking scandal.

The future of press regulation, including the role of the Press Complaint Commission, has been at the centre of the Financial Times editor Lionel Barber's participation.

Responding to Barber's evidence, Lord Justice Leveson has signalled that he expects the newspaper industry to undertake substantial regulatory reform, the Guardian wrote. The reforms will need to be recognized as credible by readers if they want to be effective, he added.

Press Gazette reported however that the presiding judge declared that he is against state controls on journalism and that he is keen that any new regulator remains "independent".

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2012-01-10 18:43

The Financial Times has adopted a bold digital strategy: it refused to tow the line when it came to Apple's policy that takes 30% of sales revenue for sales through the iTunes App Store, instead launching an HTML 5 App which can be downloaded from the paper's own website.

This potentially risky move may well be paying off.

The Pearson Group, that publishes the FT, said that the paper is now receiving over a fifth of its online traffic from mobile devices, such as smartphones and iPads, with a healthy 250,000 digital subscribers across all its subscription packages. According to The Next Web, 100,000 of these subscriptions come from a base of 2000 corporate licences, rather than sales to independent individuals. It was also revealed that the FT Group had recorded overall revenue growth of 6%.

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-11-03 16:59

The Financial Times digital application has been removed from the iTunes App Store after Apple revised its policy to ensure that it could obtain 30% of all subscription fees purchased within the store itself.

As MacRumours reports, the company revised its pricing policy in the App Store Review Guidelines to include this paragraph:

"11.14 Apps can read or play approved content (specifically magazines, newspapers, books, audio, music, and video) that is subscribed to or purchased outside of the app, as long as there is no button or external link in the app to purchase the approved content. Apple will not receive any portion of the revenues for approved content that is subscribed to or purchased outside of the app"

Essentially, this banns leading consumers away from pages inside an application to a company's own independent site, where the customer could purchase subscriptions. If companies did this, Apple wouldn't see any of that subscription money, as the transactions would not go though the Apple App Store.

The Financial Times is not happy with this arrangement.

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-08-31 16:48

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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