WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Thu - 31.07.2014


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A Brazilian car washer caused some of his loved ones to faint and others to run away in fear when he strolled into his mother’s home during his own funeral, police said yesterday. I am aware of this because the Toronto Star wrote about it, and during its first 12 hours the story was one of the most shared news reports out of Canada on the web (alongside two about hockey). I learned this through Spike, a tool that uses social metrics to track the world’s hottest news stories.

Developed by Dublin-based start-up NewsWhip and launched in beta last week, Spike uses tracking technology to find out which stories are getting the most attention on Facebook and Twitter. Users can monitor the web’s most viral stories by time frame (published in the past one, three, 12 or 24 hours), by region (currently the site has an Anglo-Saxon focus, but it is expanding) by topic, and by publisher. NewsWhip has designed Spike as a pro tool for journalists, and plans to begin charging later this year, according to Journalisk.co.uk. Until November 7, however, the tool is free for anyone to use without signing up.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-24 15:45

YouTube alienates amateur users by courting pros, Reuters

Amateur video producers who have been filling YouTube with content for years are seeing views and ad revenue on their clips fall as viewers move to watching professional and better marketed content, this article explains. YouTube’s big push to acquire professional content began a year ago, and in March the company tweaked its algorithm that recommends clips in a way that amateurs felt favoured more professionally produced content. This is good news for the news organisations who do produce slick, professional content, but if it results in fundamentally changing the platform, will it prove as popular?

The newsonomics of Advance’s New Orleans strategy, Nieman Lab

Ken Doctor takes a look at the financial implications of Advance’s move to cut back print days at The Time-Picayune, which has just gone to three days a week. In a time when many newspapers, particularly city papers, are being forced to take tough decisions to make cuts somewhere, Doctor offers a thorough analysis of whether cutting print days is likely to work, considering the cost/revenue numbers, reader and advertising habits, and institutional influence.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-10-05 16:39

Next Issue has come to the king of touch screens, and the excitement is palpable. Time is calling the magazine bundling app the Hulu for magazines, and TechCrunch has tentatively likened it to Netflix (the American movie-mailing service that has given the DVD a renaissance, for those without zip codes). This joint venture between Condé Nast, Time Inc, Hearst, Meredith and News Corp is “probably the easiest and most economical way for you to read your favourite titles” on your iPad according to Anthony Ha. Is it a good enough deal that consumers will pay for the content? PaidContent takes a look.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-07-10 17:34

This summer’s London Olympics are set to be a time of intense competition – and not just for the athletes involved in the sporting events. Yesterday, Facebook unveiled “Explore London 2012:” its new portal for this summer’s Olympic Games, suggesting that traditional media outlets may be facing increasing competition from social media in their coverage of this year’s Olympics.

Explore London 2012, which Reuters reports took 18 months to develop, is a gateway to other Facebook pages, relating to individual athletes, country teams and sporting events. Users who like the main portal will also see updates from the Olympics in their newsfeeds, and those who like individual pages will also be able to see their posts and pictures from the Games. The whole process allows fans and athletes to communicate directly though posts and comments, rather that working through the medium of a news organisation.

Ingrid Lunden at TechCrunch writes that the link between the Games and Facebook is “not exclusive”. The Games will also have a branded Twitter page (something we have already seen for NASCAR) a portal on Google+ and partnerships with Foursquare, Tumblr and Instragram.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-06-19 15:30

On Tuesday night Anthony De Rosa (@AntDeRosa), a social media editor and columnist for Reuters - once crowned "the undisputed King of Tumblr" by The New York Times - shared a Google Doc entitled Public Cheat Sheet: Social Media for News on Facebook. The post quickly garnered 51 likes, 12 shares and 6 comments.

The doc, which is broken down under the headers Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Pinterest and Quora, is open to revision by users, and De Rosa's Twitter feed shows that he is taking his own advice by answering questions and thanking people who have contributed suggestions.

Here is an assortment of key suggestions, pirated in good faith from De Rosa's generously offered cheat sheet.

Three Tumblr tips:

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-06-13 13:20

Little Girl Slaps Mom with Piece of Pizza, Saves Life

I Can’t Stop Looking at This Weird Chinese Goat

Penguin Shits on Senate Floor

These are just a few of the SEO-rich headlines that Nieman Lab mentioned a few months ago in an article about Gawker’s strategy to drive more traffic to its site. The ploy isn’t bad; Nieman’s data suggests that these three posts alone generated more than 100,000 page views.

But while penguins and pizza violence might drive a lot of traffic across the web to Gawker, two recent studies suggest that, when it just comes down to Twitter, users prefer plain news from trusted sources.

An article by Megan Garber for The Atlantic reports on a study produced by UCLA and Hewlett-Packard's HP Labs, which suggests that “steadiness -- compelling news expressed in straightforward, not hyperbolic, language -- is actually a component of maximally shareable content.”

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-06-13 09:16

Most people (hopefully!) understand the consequences of putting something online: once you upload a compromising photo or tweet something controversial, it’s available for everyone to see. But when news stories emerge and social networking is the only readily available source of data, how much should journalists publish from private Facebook or Twitter accounts? Are certain things off-limits, or is it truly anything goes? In a recent article, Poynter examines some general guidelines of reporters for publishing such content.

Poynter highlights the confusing nature of Facebook’s privacy settings as one of the main sources of journalistic dispute. Since there are numerous levels of privacy, from closed groups to more open fan pages, journalists disagree about which privacy levels are acceptable to draw from, the article said.

And, though Facebook posts between friends may be considered in the public domain, “informed consent” to publish the material might not necessarily be implied by the user, Poynter said.

“Journalists are stepping into gray territory with no widely agreed-upon standards,” Nisha Chittal of Poynter wrote.

Twitter, however, seems to be a decidedly public platform, the article said.

Author

Gianna Walton's picture

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-03-30 16:56

Many news organisations, particularly in the US, are investing time and resources in their social media strategies: both how to attract more readers, and how to engage with them more deeply. The latest Pew Research Center report on The State of the News Media in the United States found, however, that the role of social media in directing traffic to news sites was not as large as previously imagined. Nine per cent of Americans ‘very often’ follow news recommendations from Facebook or Twitter, either on computers or mobile devices.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-03-19 16:48

Al Jazeera has launched a video campaign to teach people how to use Twitter and Facebook, with the ultimate aim of empowering them as citizen journalists.

The Qatar-based news organisation has started a new YouTube Channel named Al Jazeera Unplugged to distribute videos, teaching users the basics of social networking. 

For the moment, the information is very basic indeed. “Twitter is a website where people can send and receive ultra-short messages called Tweets,” begins one clip.

Users might question the wisdom of running an educational campaign about how to use social media on a social media platform – surely most people who are on YouTube already know how to use Facebook?

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-09 17:04

Facebook’s newest feature allows users to create special sections or feeds for specific topics via ‘lists’ in a new Interests section. “Interest lists can help you turn Facebook into your own personalized newspaper,” says Eric Faller, a Facebook software engineer, on the company’s site.

The new tool can be used much like Twitter lists: anyone can create a list on a specific topic and others can subscribe to it, if the creator chooses to make it public, or visible to his or her Facebook friends. Creating a list from pages or people who you already follow is straightforward, and Facebook then suggests other organisations and people who you might want to add to it. Only the creator can edit the list.

Lists are accessible in an Interests section to the left of the newsfeed. The most popular stories from lists you subscribe to will also be shown in your main newsfeed, reported TechCrunch. Facebook gives a couple of examples of lists created by its staff: NFL Teams and 2012 US Presidential Candidates.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-03-09 14:36

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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