WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Sat - 20.09.2014


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It’s not just journalism hatchlings giving this business model a try: Gawker, Forbes and Complex all tie reporters’ paychecks to web traffic, Josh Sternberg of Digiday reported.

Complex’s approach shatters the wall between advertising and editorial: Editors are paid a percentage of the company’s revenue. Their salaries also take into account their sections’ pageviews and social media action, according to Sternberg.

“You want editors understanding the business side and their pains, and vice versa,” Complex CEO Rich Antoniello told Sternberg. “We try to have everyone, not only aware, but have skin in as many games as absolutely possible. When people know the totality of the business and run in the same direction, it makes it more effective.”

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-04-11 15:44

With this trend in mind, author-specific paywalls are becoming an increasingly attractive option for news organizations.

“Many readers — particularly younger ones — consume media based not on corporate brands but on individual writers that they feel a connection to, and I would argue that is becoming the norm,” paidContent’s Mathew Ingram recently wrote. “We read the New York Times as much for Tom Friedman or Nick Kristof as we do because it is the NYT.”

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-04-09 15:29

Data from Ireland-based startup NewsWhip shows that the most viral stories are not always those curated on page one. Founder Paul Quigley told The Editor’s Weblog that this realization will challenge the mission of some news organizations, as social distribution favors emotionally-charged and unusual stories over traditional news.

As social networks become omnipresent, newspaper front pages are losing their lustre. A Pew Foundation study showed that social networks are now the greatest distributors of news, with 33 percent of young adults accessing news via social networks and only 13 percent through print and web newspapers. With more people sharing stories on Facebook and Twitter, fewer and fewer discover news stories through newspapers’ homepages and front pages. Quigley said this trend will likely be permanent, so news organizations need to learn to adapt a “social edge” to stay relevant.

“If we’ve got a story to tell it’s that social distribution won’t go away,” said Quigley, who will present NewsWhip at WAN-IFRA’s Digital Media Europe conference in London, 15-17 April. “Maybe Facebook or Twitter might go away, but the web of people is going to be how information is going to spread.

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-04-05 16:56

a “boot camp” for journalists

Reddit is a great training tool for writers because unlike on Facebook and Twitter, users cannot lean on their followers and friends to make their posts successful. Instead, each post’s quality of writing and message is individually evaluated. Each post has an equal likelihood of making it to the site’s front page at its genesis, regardless of its author. Thus large follower bases aren’t rewarded, as they would be on Twitter and Facebook. What’s instead rewarded is concise and witty writing, the length of “half-tweets” — the same skills vital for writing headlines, which in the digital era are more important than ever. And with the deluge of posts on the site (last month there were over 55 million unique Redditors), users must hone these skills for their writing to make the front page.

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-04-04 12:29

The hashtag, which emerged organically among users on Twitter as a way for people to collect tweets on a favorite topic, has become the hallmark of Twitter. Twitter shows tags that are trending and clicking on a hashtag brings up other posts with the same tag. Facebook plans to use the hashtag similarly by using it as a way to group conversations. Hashtags have been shown to have the potential to generate ad revenue on Twitter, as advertisers can pay to promote their own hashtags.

The social media giant Facebook seems to be inching closer to Twitter in more than one way. Recently, Facebook changed the name of its “Subscribe” button to “Follow” and also renamed subscribers to followers. This tweak came after Facebook built its own button similar to Twitter’s Follow button. Facebook also began allowing people to tag celebrities and brands with the "@" sign. The site's recent redesign allows users to further personalise their news feed so that they can more easily find the information they want.

Author

Briana Seftel

Date

2013-03-15 18:05

Founded in 2006, BuzzFeed now has more than 40 million unique visitors a month and has recently been "unintentionally profitable." Much of its success comes from its ability to create shareable content.

“I’ve spent a lot of time thinking about how ideas spread,” Peretti said. You could have a huge marketing budget, but if nobody wants to share your content and ideas then it’s not working.

BuzzFeed targets the "bored-at-work" network to share its content. There are “millions of bored office workers,” he said, who blog, instant message, and use Facebook and Twitter all day. This group is bigger than any traditional major news network, he added, and these are the people who make things go viral.

These have been joined by the "bored-in-line" crowd. “I used to hate mobile,” Peretti said, as it used to be impossible to share via mobile devices. But now, half of Facebook traffic comes from mobile, and 40 percent of BuzzFeed traffic, and mobile is becoming a key driver in what makes things go viral. “You can’t go viral if your content can’t be viewed and shared on the mobile web.”

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2013-03-13 18:21

“Everybody already has a different experience,” Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg said of the site’s new newsfeed during its launch Thursday. “Not like the [fictional] Monterey Daily."

News publishers should take a page from the social networking site and individualize subscriber experiences.

Facebook’s social reader applications, popular last year, utilised profile data to determine which news stories would appeal most to individuals, and indeed such personalization increased traffic to participating newspapers. The Guardian reported 6 million active monthly users of its social reader during its peak, with more than 12 million unique installations of the newspaper’s Facebook app. Although newspapers such as The Guardian later opted against social readers, clearly personalization of content, as the social reader allowed, augments traffic.

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-03-12 17:00

Did you know that only 29 percent of Lady Gaga’s 30 million followers on Twitter actually exist? Let me just repeat that: 29 percent. That’s less than a third. The overwhelming majority are unreal, inert, mere cyphers shackled together in a collective expression of inanimate inanity. Isn’t that extraordinary?

Well, no, actually. Earlier this year, StatusPeople introduced a web tool called the Fake Follower Check that claims to ascertain how many fake followers you and your friends have. Lady Gaga, it turns out, is far from unusual: a writer at Forbes used the application to determine that 70 percent of Justin Bieber's 27 million followers are fake, as are 88 percent of Britney Spears', and 74 percent of Oprah Winfrey's.

Now, clearly, there are many plausible explanations why an account might be ‘fake’. Vast quantities of automated spam permeate the site’s chasmic recesses, and many once-genuine profiles are simply inactive. Recently, however, a more insidious manifestation of this fakery has come to light: namely, the phenomenon of ‘followers for sale’.

Author

Frederick Alliott's picture

Frederick Alliott

Date

2012-11-22 19:11

The social media aggregation site Storify has launched a restructured interface that places a revamped search function at the centre of its design. The site, which allows users to create stories from online content from social media sites such as Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest and YouTube, had already included a search feature, but as of Tuesday an enlarged version becomes the central aesthetic focus of the homepage. In addition, search items will now be ranked, as Storify puts it, ‘based on the resonance each media item has on our platform’, and all media elements of searches (photos, quotes and videos) will be displayed in a ‘tile’ or ‘card’-based layout. 

Author

Frederick Alliott's picture

Frederick Alliott

Date

2012-11-21 18:07

In a move to highlight their respective business-friendly credentials, both the biggest social networking site Facebook and the virtual social pinboard Pinterest have unveiled separate platforms designed for marketers and corporations in a move that has clear ramifications for the newspaper industry.

In their latest move to declutter the standard 'News Feed', Facebook will today role out a new ‘Pages Feed’, an unfiltered section devoted solely to promotional posts and updates from businesses. Introduced to minimize any unwanted juxtaposition between business concerns and genuinely social interaction, the concept exemplifies the balancing act Facebook must constantly perform between everyday users and those who use the site for commercial or promotional purposes. The feature, which users can click to from a button on the left side of their profile page, was reportedly developed in response to criticism from some businesses that their activities on the site were failing to reach a sufficiently wide audience.

Author

Frederick Alliott's picture

Frederick Alliott

Date

2012-11-15 19:05

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Editors Weblog

The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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