WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

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Tue - 03.05.2016


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The hashtag, which emerged organically among users on Twitter as a way for people to collect tweets on a favorite topic, has become the hallmark of Twitter. Twitter shows tags that are trending and clicking on a hashtag brings up other posts with the same tag. Facebook plans to use the hashtag similarly by using it as a way to group conversations. Hashtags have been shown to have the potential to generate ad revenue on Twitter, as advertisers can pay to promote their own hashtags.

The social media giant Facebook seems to be inching closer to Twitter in more than one way. Recently, Facebook changed the name of its “Subscribe” button to “Follow” and also renamed subscribers to followers. This tweak came after Facebook built its own button similar to Twitter’s Follow button. Facebook also began allowing people to tag celebrities and brands with the "@" sign. The site's recent redesign allows users to further personalise their news feed so that they can more easily find the information they want.

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Author

Briana Seftel

Date

2013-03-15 18:05

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Founded in 2006, BuzzFeed now has more than 40 million unique visitors a month and has recently been "unintentionally profitable." Much of its success comes from its ability to create shareable content.

“I’ve spent a lot of time thinking about how ideas spread,” Peretti said. You could have a huge marketing budget, but if nobody wants to share your content and ideas then it’s not working.

BuzzFeed targets the "bored-at-work" network to share its content. There are “millions of bored office workers,” he said, who blog, instant message, and use Facebook and Twitter all day. This group is bigger than any traditional major news network, he added, and these are the people who make things go viral.

These have been joined by the "bored-in-line" crowd. “I used to hate mobile,” Peretti said, as it used to be impossible to share via mobile devices. But now, half of Facebook traffic comes from mobile, and 40 percent of BuzzFeed traffic, and mobile is becoming a key driver in what makes things go viral. “You can’t go viral if your content can’t be viewed and shared on the mobile web.”

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Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2013-03-13 18:21

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Did you know that only 29 percent of Lady Gaga’s 30 million followers on Twitter actually exist? Let me just repeat that: 29 percent. That’s less than a third. The overwhelming majority are unreal, inert, mere cyphers shackled together in a collective expression of inanimate inanity. Isn’t that extraordinary?

Well, no, actually. Earlier this year, StatusPeople introduced a web tool called the Fake Follower Check that claims to ascertain how many fake followers you and your friends have. Lady Gaga, it turns out, is far from unusual: a writer at Forbes used the application to determine that 70 percent of Justin Bieber's 27 million followers are fake, as are 88 percent of Britney Spears', and 74 percent of Oprah Winfrey's.

Now, clearly, there are many plausible explanations why an account might be ‘fake’. Vast quantities of automated spam permeate the site’s chasmic recesses, and many once-genuine profiles are simply inactive. Recently, however, a more insidious manifestation of this fakery has come to light: namely, the phenomenon of ‘followers for sale’.

Author

Frederick Alliott

Date

2012-11-22 19:11

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The social media aggregation site Storify has launched a restructured interface that places a revamped search function at the centre of its design. The site, which allows users to create stories from online content from social media sites such as Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest and YouTube, had already included a search feature, but as of Tuesday an enlarged version becomes the central aesthetic focus of the homepage. In addition, search items will now be ranked, as Storify puts it, ‘based on the resonance each media item has on our platform’, and all media elements of searches (photos, quotes and videos) will be displayed in a ‘tile’ or ‘card’-based layout. 

Author

Frederick Alliott

Date

2012-11-21 18:07

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In a move to highlight their respective business-friendly credentials, both the biggest social networking site Facebook and the virtual social pinboard Pinterest have unveiled separate platforms designed for marketers and corporations in a move that has clear ramifications for the newspaper industry.

In their latest move to declutter the standard 'News Feed', Facebook will today role out a new ‘Pages Feed’, an unfiltered section devoted solely to promotional posts and updates from businesses. Introduced to minimize any unwanted juxtaposition between business concerns and genuinely social interaction, the concept exemplifies the balancing act Facebook must constantly perform between everyday users and those who use the site for commercial or promotional purposes. The feature, which users can click to from a button on the left side of their profile page, was reportedly developed in response to criticism from some businesses that their activities on the site were failing to reach a sufficiently wide audience.

Author

Frederick Alliott

Date

2012-11-15 19:05

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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