WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Sun - 21.01.2018


ethics

Text: 

An online international survey of the perceptions of newspaper journalists regarding value-based journalism finds that 96.2% of respondents considered “truth and accuracy” as their top core value. The survey was conducted by Dr. Prem Lal Joshi, a freelancer for the Atlantic Free Press.

Other notable results from the study include:

-verification of facts (90.4% of respondents), public interest (89.6%), objectivity and independence (89.2% each) rounded out the top five core values

-70.8% of respondents felt that stories are sensationalized in the media. However, the survey found that journalists from underdeveloped countries are more likely to sensationalize stories than those in developed countries

-respondents signaled that “people like to read real stories rather than spicy ones,” but that given the popularity of tabloids, it is important to have “a balanced approach to reporting of news and views.”

-57.1% felt there were many obstacles to practicing value-based journalism. Reported hindrances included business-based concerns like financial pressures, and external concerns such as fear of the law and access to free information. Of those who disagreed, the majority hailed from developing countries.

-female journalists tended to rate fairness as more important than their male counterparts, which Joshi proposes could be potentially due to cultural expectations that women will be caring and kind

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
6457
WEF URL: 
newsrooms_and_journalism/2008/02/valuebased_journalism_an_important_goal.php

Author

Kelley Vendeland

Date

2008-02-25 14:03

Text: 

In the eyes of Rick Stengel, Managing Editor of Time, the newspaper industry's traditional practice of endorsing candidates is an anachronism that threatens a publication's impartiality.

“Why do it at a time when the credibility and viability of the press are at all-time lows?” Stengel asks.

The practice of endorsing candidates stems from the 18th and 19th centuries when many newspapers were affiliated with political parties. Stengel argues that endorsing a candidate, even if most newspapers endorse both a Democrat and Republican candidate, negatively impacts the reader's perception of a newspapers' objectivity. In his view, the risk is especially acute in the eyes of readers under 30, who already “question the objectivity of newspapers in particular and the media and general.”

Online Journalism Review editor Robert Niles raised similar questions in his recent article “Should journalists vote?” Many newsrooms restrict their reporters' political activity in hopes of building readers' confidence in the impartiality of the paper's reporting.

Niles suggests that this is an impossible goal; by the very process of investigating political stories, reporters will be amongst the most informed people in a population, and will thus draw their own conclusions on who is best for the job.

Sources: Time, Online Journalism Review

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
6445
WEF URL: 
newsrooms_and_journalism/2008/02/us_time_editor_stengel_endorsing_candida.php

Author

Kelley Vendeland

Date

2008-02-22 12:24

Text: 

A day after police thwarted a murder plot against, Kurt Westergaard, the Danish cartoonist responsible for a controversial cartoon depicting the Prophet Mohammed wearing a bomb-shaped turban, 17 Danish newspapers printed the aforementioned drawing.

Three of the country's largest newspapers were among those to reprint the cartoon today. Editors staunchly defended their freedom of expression and refused to censor the content—noting that they would not be intimidated by fanatics, reports editorandpublisher.com.

The cartoon, considered offensive by numerous Muslims, was one of a series of 12 caricatures published in Sept. 2005 by daily Jyllands-Posten. Violent protests ensued in several Muslim countries in Jan. and Feb. 2006.

Danish police claimed to have arrested three people yesterday—a Dane of Moroccan origin and two Tunisian nationals in relation to the murder plot.

When asked why they chose to reprint the cartoon, the newspapers explained that they were demonstrating their right to publish uncensored material.

"Freedom of expression gives you the right to think, to speak and to draw what you like ... no matter how many terrorist plots there are," conservative broadsheet Berlingske Tidende wrote in an editorial.

Westergaard has lived in hiding for the past three months while the Danish press has maintained that it has “unanimously condemned the alleged murder plot against the cartoonist.”

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
6377
WEF URL: 
newspaper/2008/02/17_danish_papers_publish_moham.php

Author

Barbara Nguyen

Date

2008-02-14 11:38

Text: 

In light of the ombudsman's gradual disappearance from the world of journalism, Jeffrey Dvorkin has moved to defend the necessity of the position, in an article published yesterday entitled "Journalism's Last Line of Defense." Dvorkin was the ombudsman at NPR from 2000 to 2006.

Dvorkin discusses in detail his experience as ombudsman during the Second Intifada in the Middle East, a time during which NPR was heavily criticized by listeners for pro-Palestinian reporting. Although he acknowledges the rigors of the job, he suggests that having the position of ombudsman gave the NPR much more credibility.

We have discussed previously the necessity of having an ombudsman for both print and online publications, particularily to uphold a publication's credibility.

Interaction with readers helps the news organization understand how their reporting is being perceived by a wider public. According to Dvorkin, talking to a real person within the organization also helped to placate some enraged listeners following inevitably polarizing coverage of the Middle East.

"Overall, I think that -- for NPR -- having an ombudsman to catch the flak was better than a defensive silence, which is how many other news organizations dealt with criticism of their coverage," Dvorkin said.

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
6371
WEF URL: 
newsrooms_and_journalism/2008/02/dvorkin_defends_the_ombudsman.php

Author

Kelley Vendeland

Date

2008-02-13 18:02

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