WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Sun - 21.01.2018


Egypt

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In a bold move, a number of Egypt's most prominent independent newspapers staged a one day media blackout yesterday in protest against President Mohamed Morsi’s latest constitutional decree that hands him nearly unrestricted powers, as well as the final draft of the constitution that was adopted last week by an Islamic-led panel.

The draft constitution has been criticised for not protecting the rights of women and minority groups, and many see it as restricting freedom of expression. While Article 45 protects freedom of expression, it does not state what legitimate limitations are permissible. Nor does it outline how it will balance against other articles, such as Article 31 (”The individual person may not be insulted”) and Article 44 (prohibiting “the insulting of prophets”). These articles will make reforming provisions within the existing penal code that criminalise  “insult” and defamation, and that were frequently used to prosecute critics of the government, almost impossible. It is also important to note that criminal prosecutions on charges of “insulting the president” or “insulting the judiciary” have increased since Morsy took office.

Thirteen newspapers, including Al-Masry Al-Youm, Al-Tahrir, Al-Wafd, Al-Watan, Al-Youm Al-Sabae, Al-Fagr and Al-Ahrar, took part in the strike, while ONTV, Dream TV and CBC channels plan to temporarily cease broadcasting on Wednesday.

Author

Farah Wael

Date

2012-12-05 11:31

Welad El Balad
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Fatemah Farag, Executive Editor of Welab El Balad Media Services, has introduced a new kind of media in Egypt: hyperlocal weekly papers that are accountable to their readership and allow their readers to be part of the editorial process.

Last year’s revolution unleashed tremendous energy that led to a flood of political debate. “You now can’t go anywhere without being engaged in political debate,” she said, in contrast to the apathy and lack of concern under the former government. She was speaking at the 19th World Editors Forum in Kiev last week.

Traditional news is in deep crisis, Farag said, as years of malpractice have come to the fore. And the provinces, which had for many years been marginalized in national news, took centre stage.

All these factors have led to an explosion of new initiatives, from new publications to graffiti, to puppet shows – any way to express ideas.

Welab El Balad’s response has been to produce very local, community-based newspapers with a low cost business model. A print product is essential, Farag said: “what is legitimate, what is credible, is print.”

The three pillars of journalism that the papers aim to uphold are respect for truth, respect for the citizen and respect for humanity.

The company produces four weekly papers, in four different communities across Egypt:

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-09-12 19:13

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Many equate the invention of the Internet to the dawn of communication itself, and while this is largely inaccurate--human beings have been communicating ever since carving petroglyphs in the Stone Age--it has greatly enhanced our means of communicating, via digital networks that span the globe.

As applied to news making, the Internet, and more specifically accompanying social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter, have enabled journalists to circumvent traditional barriers of communication to share what's happening in blocked off and censored environments. This is currently going on in Egypt with the help of satellite phones, reports Mashable.

Beyond the debate of whether social media is inspiring a social revolution (something aptly discounted in a recent article by Malcom Gladwell for The New Yorker), the heart of the matter for the news industry is this: advanced communication technologies that are linked to the Internet have created a gateway for public access to international news through journalists reporting on real-time events from across state borders and often embedded in communities of interest. This is what is happening in Egypt right now despite Mubarak's attempts to block access.

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WEF ID: 
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newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/02/social_media_vastly_important_to_informi.php

Author

Ashley Stepanek

Date

2011-02-01 15:53

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"Certificates really matter", Tarek Atia, media training manager of the Media Development Programme in Egypt told participants of the 17th World Editors Forum in Hamburg, referring to IT training programmes operated in organisations including Egypt's largest paper Al Ahram. "When people get them they feel as if they have won the election" he said.

He emphasized that the USAid funded MDP has substantially changed Egypt's media. More than 4000 journalists have taken part in it since it started four years ago, 1986 in 2010 alone. Atia shared with the audience the lessons learned on institutional, individual and inspirational level.

The Media Development Programme focuses mostly on new media. Atia added that the majority of participants are between 20 and 30 years old. "It's more difficult to teach older people" said Atia. The programme operates six training centres in Egypt, and journalists are taught by foreign trainers and by graduates of the programme.

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WEF ID: 
22392
WEF URL: 
world_newspaper_congress/2010/10/new_media_training_has_changed_journalis.php

Author

Anna Tulskaya

Date

2010-10-08 14:01

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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