WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Sun - 21.01.2018


editorial quality

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The amount of international news in British dailies has significantly decreased in the last thirty years, according to a study by Martin Moore of the Media Standards Trust. The report, Shrinking World: The decline of international reporting in the British press, looked at exactly how international news has shrunk, and speculates as to why and what it means for the news landscape.

David Loyn, foreign correspondent with the BBC, expressed concern in the foreword of the report at the "increasing use of video shot by official MoD cameramen (often not attributed by broadcasters who use it) and 'quasi-journalism' from NGO activists" rather than from experienced journalists. The decline in foreign reporting "reinforces insular values - prejudices - and discourages understanding among British voters," he added.

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2010/11/how_and_why_has_foreign_reporting_declin.php

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-11-02 18:29

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A week ago the notorious whistleblower website Wikileaks released the largest classified military leak in history: The Iraq War Logs, consisting of 391,832 US military field reports from 2004 to 2009. The reports, which were given to a range of media organisations as well as some being published on Wikileaks' site, detail 109,032 deaths in Iraq, compared to Wikileaks' previous release of the Afghan War Diaries, which detailed about 20,000 deaths.

The Afghan War Diaries were made available in advance of their release to three newspapers: the Guardian, the New York Times and Der Spiegel, all known for their investigative work. The advance access was intended to increase the impact of the data at the time of its release. For the Iraq logs, Wikileaks decided that it was worth including more news organisations in the process, and worked specifically with the UK Bureau of Investigative Journalism to achieve its aims.

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2010/10/wikileaks_iraq_war_logs_a_week_on.php

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-10-29 18:59

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The chairman of Egyptian daily Al-Dustour, Reda Edward, officially notified the Journalists Syndicate on Monday of his refusal to return former editor-in-chief Ibrahim Eissa and former executive Ibrahim Mansour to their positions, Al-Masry Al-Youm reported.

Journalists from the independent daily had gathered outside the Higher Press Council's headquarters in Cairo on Monday to protest the paper's new owner's delay in meeting their demands, according to the Daily News Egypt.

Edward told Al-Masry that he agreed to most of the journalists' requests, except the demand for a board of directors, and for the return of Eissa and Mansour. He added that he is calling on the journalists to return to work, and that a new chief editor will be chosen in seven days.

Ibrahim Eissa was dismissed on 5 October within hours of the transfer of Al-Dustour to new owners, including media mogul and opposition Al-Wafd party leader al-Sayyid al-Badawi.

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2010/10/al-dustour_chairman_refuses_to_reinstate.php

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-10-20 18:28

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With the plethora of online comments, newspapers are having difficultly editing responses from their users. Reuters recently noted this problem, claiming the importance of encouraging comments that advance the content of the story while simultaneously blocking tasteless responses. "I've become increasingly concerned about the quality of discourse in comments on news stories on Reuters.com and on other major news sites," reports Dean Wright. "On some stories, the 'conversation' has been little more than partisans slinging invective at each other under the cloak of anonymity," Wright refers to how Richard Baum, Reuters Global Editor for Consumer Media, is handling the comment dilemma.

Baum affirms that newspapers need to have control over what users publish onto professional news sites. He explains that comments which contain racist language, incitement to violence, uncivil behavior towards other users are plainly unacceptable. Other types of comments where there is excessive use of capital letters, spelling and grammar errors, or irrelevant responses to the story reflect poorly on the newspaper industry. "When we block comments of this nature, it's because of issues of repetition, taste or legal risk, not political bias," says Baum.

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web_20/2010/09/reuters_solution_for_managing_comments.php

Author

Stefanie Chernow

Date

2010-09-29 12:35

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One of Yahoo's top journalists for its news blog The Upshot has quit, reportedly saying that Yahoo's 'corporate conservatism' got in the way of his attempts to report the news. According to Daily Finance's Jeff Bercovici, the Upshot's senior national affairs reporter John Cook has returned to his previous employer Gawker because he appreciates the freedom he had at the company.

Bercovici quotes his friend Cook as saying that "I really valued being able to write what I think without somebody worrying about whether it will upset somebody, or meets the sort of balancing test that newspapers apply to themselves."

"It's not so easy for a technology company to build a culture of journalism," Bercovici writes. However, The Upshot is, according to editor Andrew Golis, already the most-read news blog in the country, so it must be doing something right.

The Upshot proved mildly controversial at launch due to the fact that the blog uses data from search queries to help inform its reporting. Golis stressed that the search data is supplementary and does not lead coverage, but nonetheless the blog received much attention for this.

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2010/09/one_of_yahoos_top_journalists.php

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-09-24 14:03

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In an article by Chris Roper in the Mail and Guardian Online, the author discussed, with relation to the upcoming launch of a new paper in South Africa, the idea that there are three or more sides to every story. According to Roper, by arguing that it will tell both sides of every story, the paper's ad campaign seems to be saying that there are no shades of grey in the world and that everything is black and white.

Roper believes that The New Age newspaper will be dependent on the "limited philosophy" of the government in South Africa. "We don't live in a country where we can afford to simply be for or against anymore. We need nuance to make sense of where we are, and where we're headed," he said in the article.

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2010/09/are_there_more_than_two_sides_to_a_story.php

Author

Heather Holm

Date

2010-09-23 13:21

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Japan's newspapers, thus far healthier than their western counterparts, are now heading towards crisis, the Agence France-Presse reported. Although the country boasts the world's top selling daily, the Yomiuri Shimbun with 10 million copies a day, and newspapers remain the preferred source of news, advertising revenue has plunged and the press seems to have failed to capture the attention of much of the younger generation, according to the AFP.

Home-delivery subscriptions are strong and several updated editions of papers are produced throughout the day. But young people who have grown up with free news on the Internet might not be willing to pay: the AFP reported that according to the M1F1 Research Institute, people in their 20s view newspapers at expensive and time-consuming and replaceable by free alternatives.

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newspaper/2010/09/can_the_japanese_newspaper_industry_prev.php

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-09-16 12:46

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There is no doubt that the art of investigative journalism is declining. With newspapers' revenue streams less secure, expensive investigative journalism projects are often the first to be cut. There is hope among reporters who fear for the integrity of the news industry that crowdsourcing trends will boost investigative journalism. In some instances, crowdsourcing is helpful in getting the opinion of the people directly on site. However, a certain form of investigative journalism may still be suffering from lack of traditional means of coverage. Nieman Reports' Ethan Zuckerman explains that crowdsourcing can not replace the quality of traditional foreign reporting.

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2010/09/there_is_no_doubt_that.php

Author

Stefanie Chernow

Date

2010-09-10 12:07

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A journalist has a duty to report events, as knowledge and awareness are key players is the nervous system of a democratic state. However, professionals also have a responsibility to report events in proportion to their repercussions. The mass media could be faulted for originally referring to the mosque in NYC as the "ground zero mosque," which consequentially led to unnecessary provocation. It appears that the mass media may have faltered again by over-reporting a story of Terry Jones, a preacher in Florida, who planned to burn the Quran to commemorate the anniversary of 9/11. Richard Adams from the Guardian reports "Terry Jones outplayed the US media with his plans to burn the Quran.

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2010/09/ap_on_terry_joneskeep_coverage_in_propor.php

Author

Stefanie Chernow

Date

2010-09-10 09:04

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For MediaGuardian's ten year anniversary, the news source commented on the rising of blogs. With the creation of blog platforms, anyone who wants to publish on the web now has access to the technology. Yet it took the journalism field a long time to take bloggers seriously, as there was a distinct line between trained journalists and bloggers. Recently newspapers have made steps to acknowledge the worth of bloggers in the online news age. The Guardian has recently launched a network of science blogs and scientists, rather than just journalists, have direct access to publishing their content on the Guardian for the everyday viewer, reports Nieman Journalism Lab.

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2010/09/guardian_makes_room_for_bloggers.php

Author

Stefanie Chernow

Date

2010-09-07 18:53

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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