WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Tue - 23.01.2018


editorial quality

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Regular blogging can allow for a more detailed, expert opinion than traditional print stories, Reuter's Felix Salmon pointed out earlier this month. However, live blogging is different. It depends on information given right now, usually without analysis or heavy wording.

The form has become popular in the news industry as stories in Africa and Japan unfold. Readers have embraced the medium, bringing a huge surge in traffic and comments. The Guardian reported that live blogs account for 3.6 million unique visitors, 9 percent of the site's traffic. But as this style grows in prevalence, media experts and enthusiasts debate its pros and cons.

The cons are more obvious. With a constant live feed, readers can get lost in the story. The feeds are short and simple. For example, BBC New's live blog for Libya posted, "1031: Thirteen injured Libyans have been taken to Istanbul for treatment, a Turkish charity says. On Saturday, Turkey's deputy prime minister told a newspaper that the country was planning to treat about 450 wounded Libyans." Reading this alone, readers have no idea why the Libyans were injured, or how, or when, or even where. They just know that they have been injured and are being taken to Turkey.

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web_20/2011/03/are_live_blogs_the_future_of_journalism.php

Author

Meghan Hartsell

Date

2011-03-28 13:32

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Journalists are often taught to present the information without adding their own opinions or suggestions. The Age's ex-editor, Andrew Jaspan decided there was something lacking in this model and decided to do something about it. After several months of putting the site together and hiring staff, he and co-founder Jack Rejtman's academic commentary website The Conversation went live yesterday, according to The Sydney Morning Herald.

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web_20/2011/03/the_conversation_comes_to_life.php

Author

Meghan Hartsell

Date

2011-03-25 18:43

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On February 24 ESPN, the cable sport television network, and the Poynter Institute, "a non-profit dedicated to making journalism better", announced that a panel of faculty members from Poynter would serve as ESPN ombudsman, the internal watchdog, for the next 18 months.

The panel, known as the Poynter Review Project, will review ESPN content across all platforms and offer public comment on ESPN's efforts as well as address fans' concerns, the announcement said.

A monthly column will appear on the website while it will be more shorter and timely instalments ad issues arise.

The first ESPN ombudsman was hired in 2005: former Sunday Washington Post George Solomon. The last to serve for the 18 month-term ombudsman role was Don Ohlmeyer. You can find his last column here. Ohlmeyer, Former ABC and NBC sports and entertainment producer and programmer, succeeded Le Anne Schreiber, a former New York Times sports editor-turned-author, who succeeded Solomon in 2007.

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/03/poynter_and_espn_finding_a_way_for_accou.php

Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-03-24 14:20

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The story is often in the detail. And this is particularly true for some kinds of stories, like those dealing with big risks. Medical risks, environmental risks, health risks, natural catastrophes or even stories about terrorist threats: in all these instances, what really makes a story useful is the right details.

In the Columbia Journalism Review, David Ropeik, former environment reporter and instructor in the Harvard University Extension School's Environmental Management Program and creator of the in-house newsroom-training program "Media Coverage of Risk," discussed this topic.

In the article Ropeik highlights the importance of some aspects of risk coverage which are often not provided to the reader.

He starts saying that for an actual risk to exist is fundamental two components to be there: some hazard and exposure to it. You could have a story if there is a hazard as a potential risk is a story in itself, but a real risk exists only when both components are there. "A poisonous snake is hazardous, but not a risk if it's in a cage and we're not exposed. A snake on the loose to which we are exposed is not a risk unless it's poisonous", he says as an example.

To provide good coverage of a risk story Ropeik suggested that reporters include the following critical details, with particular reference to environmental risks.

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/03/how_to_report_risks_stories.php

Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-03-15 15:34

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The Pew Project for Excellence in Journalism (PEJ) has released its State of the Media report for 2011. Among the sections was a report on print media, which became more stable in 2010 than it had been in the past two years. Although no large profits have been made, losses were significantly less.

Circulation has been down for most large newspapers, with smaller dailies and weeklies faring better. The workforce has continued to decline, although more people were hired in 2010 than in recent years. Advertising revenue also went down, but to a much lesser degree than in the past few years. Stock market investors have more faith in the industry than in 2008, but some numbers have gone down since 2009. Overall, American newspapers aren't faring as well as newspapers on other continents, even though both Europe and Australia reported a decline.

The report in its entirety is available here.

Circulation

Circulation has continued to decline, although The Wall Street Journal had a 1.82 percent increase from 2009. Metro daily newspapers were the hardest hit, with Newsday in the lead at -11.84 percent. Smaller dailies and community weeklies have remained steadier, managing to hold onto more of their circulation.

Daily and Sunday circulation are both down. The Sunday editions, however, have still fared better than their daily counterparts.

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newspaper/2011/03/the_state_of_the_news_media_2011_news_in_1.php

Author

Meghan Hartsell

Date

2011-03-14 17:11

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Daily Star reporter Richard Peppiatt has quit over what he claims is the paper's anti-Muslim agenda, reported the Guardian. His letter to owner Richard Desmond is available in its entirety online.

In the letter, Peppiatt accuses the paper of stirring up Islamaphobia. In particular, he mentions two stories: one entitled "Muslims-only public loos" and a more recent one "English Defence League to become a political party." He also accuses the paper of knowingly printing fabricated stories.

In the "Muslims-only public loos" story, the paper inaccurately stated that a Rochdale shopping center had used taxpayer's money for Muslim only toilets. In reality, the toilets were available to all and being paid for by the shopping center itself, according to BBC News. A complaint was made to the Press Complaints Commission, and the Daily Star was told to issue an apology.

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/03/daily_star_reporter_resigns_accusing_pap.php

Author

Meghan Hartsell

Date

2011-03-07 16:12

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A media accountability system (MAS) is any nongovernmental way that encourages media organizations and journalists to respect the ethical rules set by the profession. As defined by the Reynolds Journalism Institute's MAS page, all MAS aim at improving news media, but they are extremely diverse: codes of conduct; ombudsmen and media-oriented nongovernmental organizations.

A press council (or news council), wrote RJI, is the best-known MAS. All press councils differ from one another. In its ideal shape, a press council gathers and represents all three major actors of social communication: the people who own the power to inform, those who possess the talent to inform and those who have the right to be informed.

It usually follows a Code of Practice to investigate complaints from the public about editorial content in the media. Media members and lay members usually form it.

It is a self-regulatory body and it has no other power than accountability and public trust as its effectiveness depends on its credibility and on the cooperation between actors involved. It's all about fair and trusted journalism.

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/03/about_media_accountability_system_press.php

Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-03-07 14:58

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News flash: Carlos Irwin Estevez, a.k.a. Charlie Sheen, is allegedly in the process of writing his tell-all memoir about starring on the American TV sitcom, "Two and a Half Men." Otherwise in the news, U.S. Congress may close its doors if Democrats and Republicans can't agree on the budget, massive bloodshed and civil exodus persist in Cote d'Ivoire, and Libyan rebels may invoke UN air strikes against el-Qaddafi.

But, you know, Sheen's alleged book project is totally newsworthy.

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/03/the_sheen_is_wearing_thin--is_celebrity.php

Author

Ashley Stepanek

Date

2011-03-02 15:20

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Churnalism.com is a new website launched by the UK's Media Standards Trust, aiming to identify when and how much national news organisations copy and paste from press releases. Members of the public can paste the text of a press release into a box on the site, and it then compares the text to more than 3 million articles to look for similarities.

The site lists news articles that appear to have used the press release entered, and allows users to see what percentage of a press release has been used, what percentage of the article is based on that press release, and how many characters overlap between the release and the article.

It also offers a 'visualisation' of the article containing the press release text, and aims to enable readers to compare the two side by side.

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analysis/2011/02/churnalismcom_fighting_for_more_original.php

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2011-02-24 19:04

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Is the line between advertising market pressure and editorial integrity becoming thinner?
Within the crisis much of the press is facing, being able to attract more advertising can be a critical factor in a publication's survival. And branded, or 'advertorial' content has become more popular: content published in the layout of an article. It is vital, when using this, however, to maintain editorial integrity.

As Journalism.co.uk reported
, the Association of Online Publishers has taken an interest in how media outlets can take advantage of branded content without losing readers' trust and held a conference entitled "Maintaining editorial integrity and making partnerships pay" on February 17th in London.

"The line between advertising and editorial is set to blur even further this year. Some say we're going to see more advertising moving toward content, and more acceptance of that, while others warn of inevitable damage to editorial integrity", AOP said presenting the event. While for years advertisers have been trying to align ever more closely with publishers brands online and cross-platform, now different models between simple partnerships are emerging, especially as digital advertising becomes richer and more complex - it noted.

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/02/the_press_a_giant_with_its_head_in_polit.php

Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-02-21 16:36

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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