WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Tue - 23.01.2018


editorial quality

Text: 

New media proponent Jeff Jarvis claims that camera phones are not only a useful device for papers to get user-generated photos, but are in fact “the new tool of the journalist's trade.”

Among the traditional media organizations to use camera phones, Reuters' mobile journalist project is to equip reporters with Nokia N82 phones.

The devices are kitted with a wireless keyboard, a miniature tripod, a solar battery and a small microphone – along with all the relevant software to edit and publish multimedia content.

The portability and discreet look of all-in-one devices, apart from their practicality, also change the relationship between journalists and interviewees:

“And there is the first fundamental change brought on by the mojo phone: It's small, unobtrusive, unthreatening. You don't feel as if you're talking to a camera and, in turn, to thousands or millions online,” wrote Jarvis.

Secondly, these new generation mobile devices change the entire approach to a journalistic story: many formerly written articles and bits of information can now be uploaded as video clips in a few clicks, whether to complement a story or stand-alone.

“The other significant effect the mojo camera has had on journalism is a difference in how video is used in telling stories. I felt no need to produce a piece or write a story to surround the Davos clips. The snippet was sufficient. I can also see using such video clips as part of larger stories.”

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
6359
WEF URL: 
multimedia/2008/02/jarvis_mobile_devices_to_funda.php

Author

Jean Yves Chainon

Date

2008-02-12 14:35

Text: 

Although most online journalists have heard about search engine optimization (SEO), there is still a lot for them to learn in that area. While watching out for the dark sides of SEO.

“Print headlines are often written to be clever or pithy or cute,” said new media journalist and blogger Patrick Thornton.

But on the Web, headlines need substance - style isn't very important, said Thornton. Substance typically comes from strong keywords that users will look for, and not necessarily from well-thought wording.

For example, Thornton's “NY Times and CNN show how an election should be covered” blog headline drew in significantly more traffic that his previous one, “How an election should be covered.”

For many reasons, traditional print subeditors may regret the online headline, which rids itself of many puns and clever editorial spins (See: Does online kill the headline?). “Save the artful headlines for print, and put the sweet science on the Web,” said Thornton. Some paper websites, such as Times Online, have gone as far as creating a “search editor” position within their newsroom.

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
6356
WEF URL: 
web_20/2008/02/tips_and_warnings_about_search.php

Author

Jean Yves Chainon

Date

2008-02-12 13:00

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