WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Sun - 21.01.2018


editorial quality

Text: 

The Royal Wedding is swiftly approaching.
Tomorrow, April 29th, Prince William and Kate Middleton will get married, under worldwide scrutiny.
The wedding fever is spreading, as well as scepticism about the prominence the event is obtaining.

Media around the world have directed the spotlight on the event and madness seems to be spreading among fans. (You can see some telling photos of fans and bookmakers around Westminster Abbey, provided by the citizen journalism image agency Citizenside, here.) Some items of memorabilia lie somewhere between amazing and insane.

The BBC will provide streamed footage and a live stream of the ceremony will be featured also by the official YouTube channel of the British Monarchy. As previously reported, the BBC was said to be devoting an enormous 850 staff to cover the event while Sky and ITV have 460 people there. An estimate said 8,000 reporters would be in London to cover the wedding.

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
23512
WEF URL: 
newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/04/the_royal_wedding_keep_off_satirical_fee.php

Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-04-28 16:47

Text: 

Among a multitude of innovations, the arrival of the Internet has put up challenges to the quality of information. When traditional news outlets held the monopoly on news it was their duty to provide and to assess the quality of information. They were the filter between the mass of info and the readers.

But who is going to determine quality information standards after the arrival of the Net?
Has the notion of quality changed in the information ecosystem, and if yes, how has it changed? What is the relationship between quality and quantity online?

Answering these questions and facing these challenges is the aim of Fondazione Ahref, an Italian think tank presented last week at the International Journalism Festival in Perugia.

Fondazione Ahref was born in Trento last year and has been inspired by the impressive results of some US non-profit news organizations, like ProPublica or the Knight Foundation.

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
23464
WEF URL: 
analysis/2011/04/fondazione_ahref_how_to_improve_the_qual.php

Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-04-18 18:12

Text: 

Sir Ray Tindle has spoken out against the collapse of the news industry. His privately-owned company, Tindle Newspapers, has taken pride in the fact that it hasn't made any journalists redundant. Despite this, the staff at a group of north London newspapers are striking, reported the Guardian. Staffers will be striking for two weeks starting April 19th.

The strikers believe the papers have gone down in quality, a direct effect of positions not being refilled after people leave. They said on their blog, "More than a third of editorial has left without being replaced and key positions are not being filled. Now, just three reporters are churning out a total of nine newspapers every week.... As a consequence of [the company's] refusal to replace staff a vastly inferior product is being delivered to our readers."

The nine newspapers are the Enfield Advertiser, the Edmonton Advertiser, the Winchmore Hill Advertiser and Herald, the Enfield Gazette, the Barnet and Potters Bar Press, the East Barnet Press and Advertiser, the Edgware and Mill Hill Press, the Hendon and Finchley Press and the Haringey Advertiser.

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
23453
WEF URL: 
newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/04/tindle_newspaper_staff_go_on_strike.php

Author

Meghan Hartsell

Date

2011-04-15 16:40

Text: 

The Associated Press published a story based on a fake press release yesterday, Business Insider reported, claiming that General Electric would repay its entire $3.2 billion tax refunds to the US Treasury. Thirty-five minutes later, after some news outlets had already picked up the story, AP withdrew the article and advised its customers that it was a hoax. "The AP did not follow its own standards in this case for verifying the authenticity of a news release," said AP Business Editor Hal Ritter, according to ABC News.

A grassroots movement called US Uncut, working together with the notorious activist-prankster group the Yes Men, soon took credit for the hoax. The collective's spokesperson said that the intention was to bring more public attention to corporations that avoid paying taxes. "For a brief moment people believed that the biggest corporate tax dodger had a change of heart and actually did the right thing," the spokesperson said in a statement published on the Yes Men's website.

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
23443
WEF URL: 
newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/04/ap_falls_for_fake_press_release.php

Author

Teemu Henriksson

Date

2011-04-14 14:40

Text: 

When does an event become newsworthy? Does media coverage in itself make an event newsworthy? Can news organizations and journalism be blamed for giving a made-for-media event the attention it was looking for?

These and other similar questions arose from the coverage (or the non-coverage) of evangelical pastor Reverend Terry Jones, who runs a small church in Gainesville, Florida, burning a copy of the Quran on March 20.

The story is well summed up by Poynter's Steve Myers, who wrote an article analysing the media's ability to shape the news.

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
23421
WEF URL: 
newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/04/media_blackouts_or_media_coverage_how_mu.php

Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-04-11 14:32

Text: 

Big Lead Sports started a rumor that USA Today's decision to pay its workers bonuses based on page views had been taken yesterday, April 7th. Poynter's Jim Romenesko received a statement from Today's Vice President of Communications & Event Marketing Ed Cassidy saying this decision had not yet been made.

Before Cassidy could release his statement, other publications like Mashable and Business Insider had also reported on the event. The event sparked a dialogue on what these bonuses could mean in terms of reporting.

Big Lead didn't state outright that Today had made a final decision. It said, "USA Today had a conference call last night and according to a source, the paper outlined a plan in which it will pay annual bonuses to writers based on page views."

Less that three hours later, Romenesko posted Cassidy's response: "Jim, USA TODAY has and continues to consider bonuses based on page views but nothing has been decided at this time."

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
23413
WEF URL: 
web_20/2011/04/usa_today_considering_page_view_bonuses.php

Author

Meghan Hartsell

Date

2011-04-08 16:32

Text: 

Examiner.com has released a plan to become more quality-focused, reported Social Times. The site has been called a "content farm" in the past, and has been noted for giving journalists and bloggers the opportunity to develop a following, but not necessarily for paying them well. One contributor reportedly received $35 for twenty-five posts. The site also doesn't put the most important stories first on local sites, making top stories difficult to receive without the aid of a search engine.

The site now seems to be worried that its former way of running things has hurt its credibility. As part of a change of direction, it posted a white paper April 5th discussing how to assess quality.

Written by Mitch Gelman, Examiner.com's vice president of quality, the white paper tries to find a commonality and consistency in judging story quality. Gelman puts forth 8 criteria to reach this end: appropriateness, credibility, being on topic, geographically correct for the area, timeliness or timelessness, well-told and engaging, proper formatting, and distinctiveness.

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
23397
WEF URL: 
newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/04/examinercom_makes_pledge_for_quality.php

Author

Meghan Hartsell

Date

2011-04-06 13:40

Text: 

In the age of an over-abundance of online information available more or less everywhere, why should readers still rely on newspapers as their news source?

Amongst other reasons, because they are trustworthy and still provide accurate, reliable, and thorough information. And, of course, because they recognize themselves in them.

In the effort to keep readers engaged with the paper, some newspapers are trying to improve their quality of information and underscore their commitment to accuracy and accountability.
That is what The Washington Post and the Register Citizen have done through giving a new way for readers to point out errors and submit correction requests.

As sometimes isn't easy for readers to submit correction requests, The Washington Post recently launched a report-an-error form, with the intention of making the process easier and more efficient, Poynter's Mallary Jean Tenore reported.

The form - the article said - which is displayed on every article page, asks readers to identify the type of error they've spotted and the section it appeared in. It also asks readers, "How can we fix it?" and "What do we need to know to improve future stories on this topic?"

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
23391
WEF URL: 
newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/04/correcting_errors_shows_that_you_care.php

Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-04-05 14:08

Text: 

People who think to have been publicly misrepresented or wrongly and inaccurately represented have the right to ask for a correction and to re-establish the truth about them. There is no doubt about it.

Accuracy and fair reporting are the fundamental pillars of journalism. It's the basis of professional ethics.

The need to maintain true accountability demands that the press publishes a correction whenever it is found to be necessary.

That's why many news media not only have correction pages but have also established internal watchdog system such as an ombudsman or have subscribed to self-regulation bodies as news (or press) councils.

Anyone has the right to see incorrect information rectified, celebrities as well as common people and every untruth must be corrected, no matter if it's about high ideals or simply common facts.

Money shouldn't count in this process then. That's the point raised by The Observer readers' editor, Stephen Pritchard in his last article.

"What price the truth now?", he wonders.

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
23372
WEF URL: 
newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/03/its_not_needed_to_pay_for_the_truth_prof.php

Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-03-31 13:52

Text: 

Trying to be fair and impartial in the news industry is a well-established goal. The Pew Research Center's Project for Excellence in Journalism (PEJ) released the Principles of Journalism several years ago, stating, "Keeping news in proportion and not leaving important things out are also cornerstones of truthfulness. Journalism is a form of cartography: it creates a map for citizens to navigate society. Inflating events for sensation, neglecting others, stereotyping or being disproportionately negative all make a less reliable map."

But can news organizations always avoid showing a bias? What details need to be added in order to present a holistic map of the story? These questions have troubled both BBC News and the New York Times in the past few weeks.

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
23364
WEF URL: 
newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/03/is_bias_in_journalism_impossible_to_avoi.php

Author

Meghan Hartsell

Date

2011-03-30 13:29

Syndicate content

Editors Weblog

The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


© 2015 WAN-IFRA - World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers

Footer Navigation