WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Sun - 21.01.2018


editorial quality

Text: 

Journalists and politicians are currently mulling over ways in which journalism can be moderated to avoid the kind of unethical practice that occurred at The News of the World - but does anybody actually have any good suggestions as to how this can be achieved?

The phone-hacking scandal has let to public outrage about the fact that a news organisation was operating in such a manner and as a result the British judicial and political systems have been forced to respond. But how?

A selection of inquiries, first by the Culture, Sport and Media Parliamentary Select Committee, followed by the pending public inquiry led by Lord Leveson, has been the response of the Conservative government.

At the recent Labour party conference, a controversial response came from Shadow Culture Secretary Ivan Lewis who suggested that journalists should be disciplined for their lack of ethics by being struck off a register for malpractice and banned from working again. Just like a doctor.

This remark was not a statement of intent, merely an idea. If it works for doctors, why not for journalists?

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
24043
WEF URL: 
newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/09/journalists_and_politicians_are_currentl.php

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-09-29 17:28

Text: 

The not-for-profit organisation America Abroad Media (AAM) has been forced to declare its connection with two Pakistani journalists who were receiving funding from the organisation whilst working for other news outlets.

After being contacted by The Christian Science Monitor, the AAM has now declared its connection to the two journalists, Huma Imtiaz of Express News and Awais Saleem of Dunya News. However, the most contentious issue is that the U.S. Department of State is heavily involved in funding the project, and therefore these journalists.

Is it acceptable for the U.S. to effectively finance foreign journalists who are writing about the US? Many people would respond with an instinctive, authoritative 'no'; but as Christine Fair, an assistant professor at Georgetown University, Washington, highlights in a Zeenews.com article, this question is more complex than you might think.

Fair claims that the money given to these journalists actually produces a more balanced media, as much of the media in Pakistan has a strong anti-American voice and anti-American stories are often planted by Pakistani security sources.

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
23966
WEF URL: 
newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/09/america_funding_pakistani_journalists.php

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-09-06 16:52

Text: 

Tabloids have been getting some bad press lately. The press as a whole, and tabloids in particular, have been tarred by the The News of The World scandal; but let's not forget that the tabloid is something of a cultural institution. There are undoubtedly some darker aspects to this type of journalism, but provided they keep things above board, surely there is still a place for the humble tabloid in our newsstands?

UK Sunday tabloid sales have been enjoying a boom period since the collapse of The News of The World, gaining an extra 2 million in sales from June to July this year, as The Guardian reports. So it's clear that the love affair with the tabloid is not over for the British public at least.

The relationship between UK readers and Murdoch's tabloids is a long one and it has endured hard times before.

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
23921
WEF URL: 
newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/08/why_we_still_love_tabloids.php

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-08-23 13:42

Text: 

Every journalist knows that language is the key their craft. However, it is so often too easy to get caught in the inertia of producing story after story and forget that sometimes it is necessary to go back to basics and examine the building blocks of any story: words.

Editor and Publisher reported that The New York Times has offended the families of some murder victims through injudicious use of language which they feel degrades their departed relatives.

A suspected serial killer recently murdered a series of women in the state of New York. The murderer's modus operandi involved finding women who advertised as escorts on the website Craigslist and then taking their lives.

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
23884
WEF URL: 
newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/07/mind_your_language2.php

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-07-27 18:33

Text: 

"Thank you & goodbye", read the headline of the last edition of News of the World, published yesterday. The newspaper quit its operations after a series of revelations, most glaring being the paper's involvement in the hacking of the voice mail of a disappeared 13-year-old girl.

The Sunday paper's closure was announced only four days earlier, and although the British media industry is still recovering from the move, it seems likely that it will be profoundly affected, in one way or the other, by current circumstances.

Last week, the British Prime Minister David Cameron called for the replacement of the Press Complaints Commission (PCC), which he said had failed to act sufficiently in the phone hacking affair, with a new body. The Guardian's Roy Greenslade discussed what this could mean in practice, speculating that the end result would most probably be a body with a new name and staff, but a very similar function to the PCC.

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
23804
WEF URL: 
newspaper/2011/07/the_effects_of_news_of_the_worlds_closur.php

Author

Teemu Henriksson

Date

2011-07-11 18:00

Text: 

Since 2006, The New York Times has held its annual "Win a Trip" contest with reporter Nicholas Kristof, offering students (and starting from this year someone 60 or over), the chance to accompany Kristof on a reporting assignment to Africa. Participants apply by submitting either an essay or a video explaining why they should be chosen for the experience.

This is just a small part of the wider attention Kristof, a two-time Pulitzer Prize winner, pays to Africa. His second Pulitzer, won in 2006, was awarded for his coverage of the genocide in the Darfur region of Sudan.

Kristof's most recent column appeared in the New York Times Sunday Review on July 1st, and reflected on his latest African adventure within the "Win a Trip" contest. At the same time, and as he points out on his blog, the column was also an attempt to address a broader discontent about the way news media and journalists write about Africa.

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
23787
WEF URL: 
newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/07/africa.php

Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-07-07 12:50

Text: 

In times of disaster, journalism becomes more crucial than ever. Journalists are necessary to relay information about safety and investigate responsibility.

Recognizing this, the UN recently published a manual, Disaster Through a Different Lens, for journalists covering disasters. The guide is 189 pages long and focuses heavily on disaster prevention, as disaster risk reduction is a "national obligation and a good story".

The first half of the guide is informational and summarizes the scope of disaster prevention, but reads a bit like a high school textbook. It summarizes the Hyogo Framework for Action, a plan of preparedness for disasters that countries the world over have agreed to implement. However, much of the advice it dispenses is general and would be better served if given to a government official than a journalist, such as "plan for land use" and "organize drills". However, the information could prove useful when investigating government preparedness or failure in future disasters.

The second half addresses the media's role in disaster reporting. Jonathan Baker, who until 2010 was the deputy head of newsgathering for the BBC, includes a piece about the media's responsibility. He divides the reporting into phases, from the "primary", in which the main objective is to disseminate information to raise awareness and detail where to find shelter, water, and food.

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
23666
WEF URL: 
newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/06/dissecting_the_uns_guide_for_disaster_re.php

Author

Florence Pichon

Date

2011-06-07 18:06

Text: 

During health pandemics and environmental catastrophes, a press debate arises every time over the thin line between informative and accurate reporting about risks and preventions and useless, if not damaging, alarmism.

We saw it during the Swine Flu of 2009 and the Avian Flu of 2003, and now it's the time of the E coli bacterium. According to the Guardian, it has killed 22 people and has infected people across 12 countries, causing alarm across Europe.

Information about the geographical origin of the outbreak is so far unclear, as is the information about which vegetable caused the epidemic.

After an initial assumption of a Spanish cucumber origin, the Guardian reported that it seems now that the outbreak was probably caused by bean sprouts grown in Germany, where the cases are centred.

Over the course of the past week, different vegetables were implicated as the source of the infection.

As Libération reported, citing AFP, the German newspapers provided extensive coverage investigating the different alleged origins of the outbreak.

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
23658
WEF URL: 
newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/06/the_e_coli_infection_and_its_coverage_in.php

Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-06-06 16:58

Text: 

One of the more encouraging developments in journalism in recent years has been the rise of the fact-checking movement, wrote Rem Rieder in the American Journalism Review.

Several fact-checking organizations have indeed flourished in recent years. Some, like FactCheck.org or PolitiFact.com, were born autonomously outside the mainstream media, while others are internal departments of newspapers and news media, like the Washington Post's Fact Checker column.

The aim of all of them is to conduct in-depth analysis into politicians' statements and claims and verifying their truthfulness, checking if the facts contained in those declarations are accurate or inaccurate.

PolitiFact even won a Pulitzer Prize in 2008 for national reporting during the presidential election and created an "Obameter" to help readers assess the Obama presidency.

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
23630
WEF URL: 
newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/05/information_misinformation_and_fact_chec.php

Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-05-27 17:02

Text: 

When Google changed its search algorithm last month, Demand Media took a serious hit. According to a comparison by Conductor, the search visibility of Demand Media's eHow site dropped significantly, which explains why the company saw a notable drop also in stock value. The rumours around the company were so pessimistic that it was forced to issue a statement defending its finances.

The California-based Demand Media, which according to Reuters has 13,000 freelancers writing to its sites such as eHow and LiveStrong, is now taking measures to step up the content of its sites. In an interview with MediaShift, Larry Fitzgibbon and Jeremy Reed from Demand Media described the course the company is next taking. Some of the changes sound very much like steps towards a more traditional journalistic model.

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
23562
WEF URL: 
newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/05/demand_media_to_improve_ehows_content_af.php

Author

Teemu Henriksson

Date

2011-05-09 19:10

Syndicate content

Editors Weblog

The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


© 2015 WAN-IFRA - World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers

Footer Navigation