WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Tue - 30.09.2014


editorial quality

According to French journalist Laure Nouraout on meta-media.fr, the summit panelists made reference to the Boston bombing regularly throughout the day to provide a solid basis for their discussions. As David Hayward, Director of the BBC College of Journalism's events programme wrote on his blog: "Last week was quite extraordinary for breaking news stories. I was in New York for most of it, preparing for the BBC College of Journalism and New York Times Social Media Summit #smsnyc. As many people pointed out, the event could not have come at a better time for the issues that were to emerge."

The summit took a critical glance at the way in which breaking news is treated and consumed by the masses. The general consensus seems to be that events in Boston have acted as a real game-changer for the relationship between journalism and social media. Developments during the Boston bombing scandal were reported and discussed on Twitter on an unprecedented scale and hereby revealed the extent to which traditional methods of news reporting such as TV and radio are growing largely outdated.

Author

Emily Moore

Date

2013-04-23 17:49

Before Oscar Pistorius’ murder trial began Tuesday, we heard about the rumpled bed sheets, the bloodied cricket bat, Reeva Steenkamp’s shattered skull. We heard whispers of the text message from a former lover that might have sparked an argument between couple, we read about the steroids that Pistorius might have been using that might have caused “‘roid rage.”

Before the trial began, we were told by a South African newspaper that the case against the athlete was “rock-solid.” And before the trial began, many issued guilty verdicts: Los Angeles radio station 98.7 FM tweeted Tuesday, “Today’s Douche of the Day is Pistorius for shooting his girlfriend and being all guilty about it later. Not cool.”

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-02-20 18:49

After The Sun plastered murder victim Reeva Steenkamp unzipping her bikini on its front page on Friday, Twitter exploded with comments from outraged users. The model shot to death by her boyfriend, Olympian “Blade Runner” Oscar Pistorius, was noted as an activist for women’s empowerment, yet a petition with more than 4,500 virtual signatures argues that her image exemplifies a persisting view “that women are worthless pieces of meat, who aren’t safe from objectification even after their death.”

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-02-18 16:43

How to be successful online? It’s a question newspapers worldwide are asking and the answer may not be much more complicated than something we already know how to do: good editing.

This insight comes from a recent World Editors Forum study tour of multimedia newsrooms in the United States, during which we visited The Huffington Post as well as several other media organizations. 

The HuffPost is one of the most successful news websites in the world. Much has been written about the fact it that aggregates a great deal of its content. As the argument goes, The Huffington Post is getting rich off the work of our journalists. However, that generalization hardly explains its success. The site is edited with sophistication, imagination and attention to detail, just like a good newspaper.

This became clear one morning as I prepared for our group of overseas journalists to visit The Huffington Post as well as the New York Daily News. I was struck by the similarities of their websites. Both covered many of the same stories in a similar fashion. The stories were intriguing, headlines were creative and pictures captured the visitor’s attention. 

Author

Randy Covington

Date

2012-12-06 10:27

It was 1978, and as a 22-year-old research manager I was despatched to meet the formidable Editor of The Scotsman for the first time. Having squirmed in my seat as I explained what I vaguely understood about the latest readership figures, and detecting a friendly response, I asked the great man: “What is it like to run Scotland’s national newspaper?”

“Run a newspaper?” he boomed. “I run a COUNTRY!”

I’ve found myself recounting this story on various occasions recently, to an editor of a major national daily, and the owner of a group of local weeklies, among others. All of these conversations shared a common theme: namely the role of the editor in the modern world. And they all came to a different version of the same conclusion: that the role of the editor was diminishing.

When Eric MacKay was appointed, 155 years after The Scotsman’s launch he was its thirteenth editor, and held the job for 14 years. In the 27 years since he retired, there have been a further thirteen. Few of these later incumbents lasted more than two years in the job.

In the UK the spotlight has recently focussed on the role and regulation of the press, primarily the national tabloids, but despite government assurances to the contrary, a widespread fear is that the consequence of the various enquiries now reaching conclusion will be greater regulation, with further limitations on news-gathering and story telling.

Author

Guest

Date

2012-10-16 11:22

International news translation platform Worldcrunch plans to expand its aggregation efforts in a big way—by enlisting the help of its contributors in finding “crunch" worthy articles from around the world, Nieman Journalism Lab reported.

Founded last year by Jeff Israely and Irène Toporkoff in Paris, Worldcrunch translates 20-30 articles per week written by its international news partners, which include French daily newspaper Le Monde and German daily Die Welt, as we previously reported. The articles, chosen by Worldcrunch’s team of journalists and covering topics such as politics to entertainment, are meant to provide English readers with broader perspectives of international affairs, as well as highlighting the viewpoints of citizens from the countries in question.

Worldcrunch has been touted as an appealing option in the face of reductions in foreign news coverage, as we previously reported. And the trend seems to extend past English-speaking readership: French weekly magazine Courrier International and Italian weekly Internazionale provide similar services for French and Italian readers, respectively.

Author

Gianna Walton's picture

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-26 15:33

Does 'plundering' information from Facebook raise similar ethical questions to phone-hacking? Glenda Cooper, a lecturer at London's City University, studied the ethical implications of journalists using information from Facebook without the users' permission, as reported by Press Gazette.

"What kind of journalism are we getting if every part of your life is only a mouseclick away from being splashed across the front page of a national paper?" Press Gazette quotes Cooper as saying. Clearly, taking information that has been made public online is very different to phone-hacking, which involves stealing private information, but it is still using information that was not provided for journalistic purposes.

As journalists frequently have less time to report, due to both financial pressures and the need to break stories online quickly, this kind of "short-cut journalism," using social media to find out about individuals, has increased, the study said.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-02-22 19:38

"Thou shalt not plagarise". This phrase surely must be somewhere near the top of the ten commandments of journalism.

Hence in 2005, when David Simpson, then-cartoonist for The Tulsa World, was found to have redrawn somebody else's work, the paper's publisher Robert E. Lorton III dismissed him, saying he had committed "the cardinal sin of a newsroom". The story was reported at the time by the AP and picked up by Sign On San Diego.

Still, there's no peace for the wicked; history has repeated itself. After his dismissal from The Tulsa World, Simpson was hired by the Urban Tulsa Weekly but, as Poynter reports, he was fired yesterday for further instances of copying other people's work.

And Simpson's not the only news professional recently brought up for plagiarism. Another Poynter article published on Monday points out that a journalist from the Journal Register Company's Middletown Press was found to have plagiarised "significant portions" of an article about a man charged with disorderly conduct from a local Patch website.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2011-11-02 19:22

What is the hallmark of good journalism? Objectivity would be one of the standard replies: neutral journalism that is not partisan and that steers clear of disseminating personal opinions.

Actually, the answer is just not quite as simple as that. Hang on to your hats, people, it's time for an ethics class...

Wait a second, I hear you cry, before you take me back to journalism school - what's wrong with objectivity? Here's the thing: now it's obligatory for every journalist to have their hand hermetically sealed to a smartphone so they can dutifully maintain a Twitter account. It is becoming increasingly essential and easy to maintain an online presence; you need a Facebook page, a Linkedin profile and a FourSquare account. These are all useful tools in their own way. However, all this social media activity means that it is becoming ever harder to deny the fact that journalists are people. Shocking, I know, but it's true. Journalists are people - and people are not objective.

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-11-02 18:06

The trial of American student Amanda Knox has been the on-and-off focus of global media attention since 2007, when the murder of British student Meredith Kercher took place in the Italian city of Perugia. This latest trial is an appeal against a verdict given in 2009 that sentenced Knox to 26 years in jail for her alleged role in Kercher's murder. Knox's then boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, was also implicated in the crime and sentenced to 25 years.

Yesterday, the appeal verdict was delivered: not guilty. After four years in jail for Kercher's murder, Knox was released.

Naturally, the media were ready for the announcement. It's an old game, reporting the verdict of a big case. Gone are the days when newspapers would print two copies of their front page - one anticipating a guilty verdict and one in case the defendant were found not guilty - but the guessing, the preparation and the anticipation still remains. Now, in the age of instantaneous digital mobile news, the challenge is to be the news organisaion to break the story first - oh yes, and to be the one that publishes the correct information.


Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-10-04 14:39

Syndicate content

Editors Weblog

The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


© 2013 WAN-IFRA - World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers

Footer Navigation