WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Tue - 23.01.2018


editorial direction

Text: 

Inspired by the NPR/Juan Williams case, Kelly McBride analyses on Poynter the need for news organizations to review their code of ethics in the light of modernization the news world is facing.

"Buried in last week's announcement was news that the public radio company is reviewing its code of ethics. If newsroom leaders around the country honestly assessed their own operations, they'd find that most of them have out-dated, unclear ethics policies, which they apply inconsistently. That is, those with policies", she wrote.

Last October, Juan Williams, senior news analyst at NPR, was dismissed for having said on Fox News Channel that, even if it is wrong to brand all Muslims as terrorists, he gets nervous when he sees someone in "Muslim garb" on an airplane, as NPR reported. NPR said the comment was just the most recent in a series of things Williams has said while offering commentary on Fox that violated NPR's standards because they venture into the realm of opinion rather than analysis.

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
23003
WEF URL: 
newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/01/how_to_uphold_traditional_standards_whil.php

Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-01-12 17:44

Text: 

The editorial staff of Italian financial daily, Il Sole 24 Ore, yesterday decided to call a three-day strike, Franco Abruzzo, the former president of the Lombardy region's Ordine dei Giornalisti, reported.

A staff meeting effectively passed a motion of no confidence in the editor-in-chief, Gianni Riotta. The staff representative committee will decide when to call the strike, awaiting the board of directors meeting, planned for January 16th, when the newspaper's global situation will be analysed.

Riotta is accused of having caused a loss of 54 000 copies in the past 18 months. And despite the Sunday supplement Il Domenicale's transformation to a tabloid format, which Riotta strongly supported, resulting in a flop, he has still insisted on pursuing converting the daily paper to that format.

On January 7, Affaritaliani.it published an email from Nicola Borzi, journalist and former member of the Sole 24 Ore staff representative committee, in which he released the "real" figures of the Confindustria publisher group's balance sheet. Attaching the files, Borzi showed the newspaper's collapse in circulation and the €24.6 million loss, which has increased by 11.64% compared with last year.

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
23001
WEF URL: 
newspaper/2011/01/the_crisis_of_il_sole_24_ore.php

Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-01-11 19:01

Text: 

Fréderic Filloux's Monday Note looked at the problems facing Le Monde as it moves towards a revamp under new ownership. The "iconic" French daily was bought in September 2010 by Pierre Bergé, Xavier Niel and Matthieu Pigasse and president of the paper's management board, Eric Fottorino, was ousted from his position in December due to "differences of opinion" with the new owners.

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
22997
WEF URL: 
newspaper/2011/01/le_monde_prepares_for_revamp.php

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2011-01-10 17:47

Text: 

After a fatal shooting during a public event in an Arizona shopping center, some news organizations reported erroneously that U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, who attended the event, died after being shot.

As Poynter.org reported, some newspapers and journalists regret the error and have been taking stock of what happened. Poynter pointed to the explanations on Twitter from NPR's David Folkenflik about the error. NPR was the first national news organization to report the news.

In a series of tweets he said: "This is a terrible day, compounded for Giffords' family, friends, constituents & colleagues by initial & errant reports of her death (...) It's ahistorical to think initial reports in earlier incidents were uniformly accurate, tho journos should be accountable (...) I'm saying it's regrettable & damaging, but also regrettably predictable. I'm not being apologist; I'm describing how it works (...) News orgs should be aggressive in reporting; conservative in printing/broadcasting/posting; transparent about how they get what they get (...) But to say sources - even seemingly authoritative sources - can't themselves get things wrong in the heat of moment ignores reality".

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
22996
WEF URL: 
newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/01/errors_and_apologies_in_reporting_arizon.php

Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-01-10 13:04

Text: 

In the New York Times, Brian Stelter tried to take the stock of the US news coverage of the Afghan. "As the Obama administration conducted an Afghanistan-Pakistan strategy review this month, the news media did too, and the coverage came peppered with question marks", he said.

He cited the ABC News series of segments titled "Afghanistan: Can We Win?", the special report "Can This War Be Won?" of CBS Evening News by Katie Couric and a recent New York magazine headline questioning "Why Are We in Afghanistan?"

"The questions reflect the complex nature of the Afghan war, and of the news coverage", he argued.

The Project for Excellence in Journalism, of the Pew Research Center, cited in the Stelter's article, produces every week a News Coverage Index, analyzing which news dominate the week.

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
22979
WEF URL: 
newsrooms_and_journalism/2010/12/the_us_news_coverage_of_the_afghan_war.php

Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2010-12-21 14:29

Text: 

A New York-based research firm has been offering cash to reporters who are willing to give their opinions on their area of expertise, the Washington Post reported. PFC Opinion Research is looking for journalists who cover the energy sector and is proposing to pay them $250 to answer questions for about 25 minutes, specified the Post.

An email sent last week to journalists, including several at the Washington Post, requested reporters who were willing to talk about "certain aspects of oil and gas industries." It promised to pay them in cash and keep their names private.

This kind of procedure clearly raises ethical issues. The client PFC is working for is presumably someone with an interest in the sector. Reporters strive to keep their own opinions out of their writing, so how can they justify selling their opinions to those who they are likely to report on?

The Washington Post spoke to David Leonard, director of PFC, who compared journalists' participation to being part of a focus group. "We're trying to learn how people feel about policy," he told the Post, rather than trying to shape an ad campaign.

The biggest ethical issue seems to be that the reporters would be paid for their time. Taking money from such an initiative could well be interpreted as a conflict of interest.

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
22974
WEF URL: 
newsrooms_and_journalism/2010/12/should_journalists_accept_money_for_prov.php

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-12-20 14:54

Text: 

Bloomberg has announced that it would begin publishing editorials in an effort to broaden the company's influence on national affairs, the New York Times reported.

Bloomberg View, as the initiative is called, will publish columns and commentary across all Bloomberg platforms and will be run by two executive editors: David Shipley, deputy editorial page editor and op-ed editor of the New York Times, and James P. Rubin, former assistant secretary of state under Bill Clinton.

As Talking Biz News says, Rubin will oversee editorial issues in Central and South America, Mexico, Europe, the Middle East, Asia and Africa, and Shipley will maintain oversight of the U.S. and Canada. Both will report directly to the editor in chief of Bloomberg News, Matthew Winkler.

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
22953
WEF URL: 
newsrooms_and_journalism/2010/12/bloomberg_will_begin_to_publish_editoria.php

Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2010-12-16 14:07

Text: 

WikiLeaks continues to make front pages around the world following the release of its latest leak: a quarter of a million US diplomatic cables. Developments include:

US Senator Joe Lieberman, chair of the Senate homeland security committee, told Fox News that the New York Times and other news organisations that have published the US embassy cables could be investigated for breaking US espionage laws. "To me the New York Times has committed at least an act of, at best, bad citizenship, but whether they have committed a crime is a matter of discussion for the justice department," he said.

PayPal has admitted that pressure from the US State Department led the company to freeze WikiLeaks' accounts. It is the first major corporation to admit that its decision to suspend dealings with WikiLeaks was the result of US government pressure, the Guardian said. The US government, however, has denied writing to PayPal.

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
22890
WEF URL: 
newsrooms_and_journalism/2010/12/wikileaks_latest_developments.php

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-12-08 19:08

Text: 

With its latest release, Wikileaks has attracted an unprecedented amount of attention, sparking international debate and sharply dividing commentators, both political and media. The 250,000 confidential diplomatic cables were shared with the Guardian, Le Monde, Der Spiegel and El Pais, and the Guardian passed them on to the New York Times. Some of the stories that have come out of them are fascinating and well within what would usually be seen as the public interest, others are more gossipy and merely embarrassing. Wikileaks' three major leaks earlier this year placed it in international consciousness, but cables have taken its fame, or notoriety, sky high.

On one side there are those who condemn Wikileaks' actions as highly irresponsible and putting US national security at risk. Wikileaks' founder Julian Assange is already being sought for charges of rape, and many in the US are now calling for his prosecution for espionage. It has even been suggested that espionage laws be updated so that what Wikileaks has done becomes a crime. Assange's assets in Switzerland have been frozen.

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
22877
WEF URL: 
analysis/2010/12/wikileaks_and_cablegate_-_a_threat_to_na.php

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-12-07 12:08

Text: 

News Limited, the Australian branch of Rupert Murdoch's News Corp, has just launched a national sports network, News Limited Sports Network (NLSN). The news comes shortly after the announcement that some of Murdoch's Australian papers are to start charging online.

NLSN will be based in the Melbourne Herald Sun's offices. The new sports network will centralize a plethora of company-owned divisions from across Australia such as The Daily Telegraph and The Sunday Telegraph in NSW, and Victoria's Herald Sun, Sunday Herald Sun, The Courier-Mail and Sunday Mail in Queensland. Working together, the reporters and photographers will "cover every breaking story, every big event, from every angle, every minute of the day," according to Tom Salom, the network's publisher.

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
22817
WEF URL: 
newsrooms_and_journalism/2010/11/news_limited_centralizes_sports_news_acr.php

Author

Paul Hoffman

Date

2010-11-26 16:48

Syndicate content

Editors Weblog

The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


© 2015 WAN-IFRA - World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers

Footer Navigation