WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Sun - 21.01.2018


editorial direction

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On Saturday May 14 Dominique Strauss-Kahn, head of the International Monetary Fund and until then the favoured Nicolas Sarkozy's challenger in the next presidential elections in France, was arrested in New York and charged with the sexual assault of a housekeeper in his suite at the Sofitel Hotel.

In addition to the consequences the case is having on international politics, international relations and French politics (Strauss-Kahn resigned on May 19 as head of IMF), it is also enlivening the debate within news media.

To sum up, of course simplifying, the French press is blaming the US media of being too unscrupulous in covering the news, neglecting the right to be considered innocent before being proved guilty. On the other hand, the US press is blaming the French press of being "reluctant" in covering the case in order to protect Dominique Strauss-Kahn's private life.

Some Europeans are upset over how American journalists have used "perp walk" photos and videos of International Monetary Fund chief Dominique Strauss-Kahn, wrote Al Tompkins on Poynter.

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/05/how_the_press_covered_dominique_strauss-.php

Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-05-20 00:17

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The UK Press Complaints Commission is seeking to bring journalistic Twitter feeds under its regulation, the Guardian reported

The article noted that while the PCC is currently unable to rule on complaints about newspapers' tweets, it is trying to consolidate social media messages under its remit and has started consultation with the newspapers industry to this end.

Some postings on Twitter should be considered - in PCC's opinion- as part of a "newspaper's editorial product" and should go under the regulation of the code of practice.

The plan, however, the Guardian said, is to distinguish between newspapers' accounts, professional journalistic accounts and private tweets. "Some journalists - such as the BBC's Rory Cellan-Jones - already maintain multiple accounts in an effort to preserve professional and personal distinctions", the article noted.

The article also reported that a PCC online working group has already recommended that the body undertake a "remit extension", the formal mechanism by which the self-regulatory body takes on a new area of responsibility, after consulting with the newspaper industry as to how Twitter regulation can be implemented.
"That consultation is due to finish in the summer and the new rules are likely to be in place by the end of the year."

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Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-05-09 18:03

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When a question that has already been answered keeps getting asked, how should the mainstream media cover it? American Journalism Review's Rem Rieder discussed this in relation to the "birther" movement that has again gained momentum in the United States, causing President Obama to address the topic on Wednesday by releasing a long-form birth certificate.

The main reason the president gave for addressing the issue head-on was the extensive coverage it received in the press. He said that the topic was blown to such proportions that it distracted public debate on real issues that the country is facing. Although it may not have been the dominant topic in the media, unlike Obama mentioned, it is plausible to say that the question overshadowed more worthy discussion.

Rieder wrote that in the old days, mainstream media would not have needed to cover a topic that has already been exhausted - more than two and half years ago, in fact. So why do elite news organisations still pay attention? Rieder sees this as a proof of a change in media industry: "In the world of Web sites, talk radio and cable news, pretty much anyone and anything can find an audience."

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/04/the_birther_movement_or_why_do_the_media.php

Author

Teemu Henriksson

Date

2011-04-29 18:49

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"The issue is not about whether we're going to be reading off of paper or whether we'll be reading off backlit screens or whether we're going to be reading on the moon. The future belongs to visionary and courageous people to get the power back to the editorial floor".

Thus spoke Tyler Brûlé, the founder of Monocle Magazine, interviewed by Gopher Illustrated about his magazine and the business model behind it.

Brûlé founded Monocle in 2007 after having founded and directed the magazine Wallpaper*. Monocle, which has become not only a magazine but also a brand, bases its economic model on high quality content in a glossy, bookish, printed format.

As Business Week reported last year, in 2010 Monocle, three years old, boasted a global circulation nearing 150,000, a 35 percent annual increase at a time when magazine sales were supposed to be going in other direction, and a rising subscription base of 16,000. "If that sounds small, consider that these individuals pay $150 for 10 issues, a 50 percent premium over the newsstand price", the article said.

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/04/monocles_tyler_brule_still_believing_in.php

Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-04-27 18:21

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The Boston Globe's recent decision to hire outside help to moderate its online comments, reported by Media Nation, is the latest event to prompt discussion on the different means news websites have in dealing with an overflow of readers' comments. The newspaper joined NPR and the San Francisco Chronicle as clients of ICUC Moderation Services, a Canadian company specialised in moderating online content.

Niemen Journalism Lab spoke to Keith Bilous, ICUC's president, about the benefits of outsourced comment moderation. According to him, hiring outside help both frees up newsroom resources and provides a possibility for a discussion about the function of readers' comments generally. "The focus is on getting more better-quality comments and conversation on sites instead of 'let's just get as much comments as we can.'"

Bilous noted that when it comes to improving online discussion, different companies have different objectives. No one wants to see potentially libellous comments on their website, but some questions, such as whether to audit comments before or after publishing them, have to be answered separately in each case.

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Author

Teemu Henriksson

Date

2011-04-22 12:16

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Being paid to write about the person who actually pays your salary is quite a big challenge, especially if you care about maintaining your credibility.

The issue is the focus of a New York Times article about the difficult position of Henry Goldman, the journalist within Bloomberg who is charge of writing about Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg, the founder and majority owner of Bloomberg LP, the parent company of Bloomberg News.

For ten years - the article highlighted - his assignment has included chronicling Bloomberg's ups and downs for the global New York news service. Now Goldman is facing hard times as the mayor had a rough start of his third term and his approval ratings are the lowest of the last eight years.

It won't therefore be easy for Goldman to maintain his "down-the-middle" style as he risks being harshly criticized for overly positive coverage but at the same time he risks the ire of
Mr. Bloomberg himself.

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/04/the_thin_line_of_credibility_how_to_repo.php

Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-04-22 10:57

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Two major humanitarian disasters in 2010 were covered very differently by the media: why did the earthquake in Haiti attract so much more of the Italian media's attention than the floods in Pakistan? At the International Journalism Festival in Perugia, a panel discussed the aspects of a natural disaster that lead to more or less media coverage, with a specific focus on Italy.

Looking at morning and evening newscasts on major Italian TV channels, there were 150 devoted to Haiti, 88 to Pakistan and more than 350 on the summer's heatwave in Italy, pointed out Sergio Cecchini, director of communications at Italy's branch of Doctors Without Borders.

Giovanni Porzio, special correspondent for Italian magazine Panorama, believes that Haiti received more media attention partly because of the sudden, dramatic nature of the disaster, partly due to timing, and partly because of geo-political considerations. The Haitian earthquake caused immediate large scale destruction, and this and the looting which followed were good subjects for photography and TV. The crisis in Pakistan, however, built up gradually, as the water level rose over several weeks, and was consequently a less immediately compelling tragedy.

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/04/why_do_some_disasters_receive_more_atten.php

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2011-04-14 17:13

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The Associated Press published a story based on a fake press release yesterday, Business Insider reported, claiming that General Electric would repay its entire $3.2 billion tax refunds to the US Treasury. Thirty-five minutes later, after some news outlets had already picked up the story, AP withdrew the article and advised its customers that it was a hoax. "The AP did not follow its own standards in this case for verifying the authenticity of a news release," said AP Business Editor Hal Ritter, according to ABC News.

A grassroots movement called US Uncut, working together with the notorious activist-prankster group the Yes Men, soon took credit for the hoax. The collective's spokesperson said that the intention was to bring more public attention to corporations that avoid paying taxes. "For a brief moment people believed that the biggest corporate tax dodger had a change of heart and actually did the right thing," the spokesperson said in a statement published on the Yes Men's website.

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/04/ap_falls_for_fake_press_release.php

Author

Teemu Henriksson

Date

2011-04-14 14:40

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The Guardian's Roy Greenslade discussed a new book that highlights a hidden (and sometimes not so hidden) tendency in the British press to approach matters relating to Islam from a prejudiced standpoint. Pointing the Finger: Islam and Muslims in the British Media, edited by Julian Petley and Robin Richardson, presents examples of misleading news reporting on Islam-related matters. "Few topics are as controversial as the media treatment of Muslims, and too few journalists take it seriously," Greenslade wrote.

Greensdale acknowledges that the press has a strong influence when it comes to shaping views on minorities and encourages all journalists to read the book. "It is press-generated myths about Islam that fuel misunderstandings and feed prejudice, and thus bedevil rational discussion," Greenslade asserted.

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/04/a_new_book_examines_the_treatment_of_isl.php

Author

Teemu Henriksson

Date

2011-04-12 18:57

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The News of the World published an apology last Sunday, admitting liability in accessing voicemail messages. In addition to apologising "unreservedly," the paper announced that it was going to pay compensation to phone-hacking victims and set up a compensation scheme. "What happened to [the victims] should not have happened. It was and remains unacceptable," the apology said.

The confession marks a shift in the paper's attitude: instead of distancing itself from the arrested journalists by labeling them "rogue reporters" - a claim that was immediately challenged - the News of the World now accepts some degree of responsibility over the events. However, according to The Independent, some critics have said that the apology is more a "damage limitation exercise" than a genuine admission of wrongdoings. The careful wording of the apology (it does not discuss the extent of phone-hacking, for example) and lack of real new information would suggest this.

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/04/reactions_to_notws_apology_for_voicemail.php

Author

Teemu Henriksson

Date

2011-04-11 19:09

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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