WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Tue - 23.01.2018


editorial direction

Text: 

Every journalist knows that language is the key their craft. However, it is so often too easy to get caught in the inertia of producing story after story and forget that sometimes it is necessary to go back to basics and examine the building blocks of any story: words.

Editor and Publisher reported that The New York Times has offended the families of some murder victims through injudicious use of language which they feel degrades their departed relatives.

A suspected serial killer recently murdered a series of women in the state of New York. The murderer's modus operandi involved finding women who advertised as escorts on the website Craigslist and then taking their lives.

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
23884
WEF URL: 
newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/07/mind_your_language2.php

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-07-27 18:33

Text: 

As the toll of casualties from The News of the World scandal increases, the race is on for other publications, owned by various subsidiaries of the Murdoch media empire, to distance or rebrand themselves so as not to find themselves caught in the line of fire.

Over the weekend yet more senior figures, from the worlds of journalism, politics and policing have been further embroiled in the scandal and have paid the price. Former head of News International Rebekah Brooks (who resigned from her post last week) was arrested and later released while Metropolitan Police Commissioner Sir Paul Stephenson has resigned along with Les Hinton, C.E.O. of Dow Jones, who testified in British Parliamentary Inquiries in 2007 and 2009 attesting that phone hacking was the fault of one single reporter and not symptomatic of wider company policy.

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
23832
WEF URL: 
newspaper/2011/07/as_the_toll_of_casualties.php

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-07-18 16:38

Text: 

"Thank you & goodbye", read the headline of the last edition of News of the World, published yesterday. The newspaper quit its operations after a series of revelations, most glaring being the paper's involvement in the hacking of the voice mail of a disappeared 13-year-old girl.

The Sunday paper's closure was announced only four days earlier, and although the British media industry is still recovering from the move, it seems likely that it will be profoundly affected, in one way or the other, by current circumstances.

Last week, the British Prime Minister David Cameron called for the replacement of the Press Complaints Commission (PCC), which he said had failed to act sufficiently in the phone hacking affair, with a new body. The Guardian's Roy Greenslade discussed what this could mean in practice, speculating that the end result would most probably be a body with a new name and staff, but a very similar function to the PCC.

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
23804
WEF URL: 
newspaper/2011/07/the_effects_of_news_of_the_worlds_closur.php

Author

Teemu Henriksson

Date

2011-07-11 18:00

Text: 

Since 2006, The New York Times has held its annual "Win a Trip" contest with reporter Nicholas Kristof, offering students (and starting from this year someone 60 or over), the chance to accompany Kristof on a reporting assignment to Africa. Participants apply by submitting either an essay or a video explaining why they should be chosen for the experience.

This is just a small part of the wider attention Kristof, a two-time Pulitzer Prize winner, pays to Africa. His second Pulitzer, won in 2006, was awarded for his coverage of the genocide in the Darfur region of Sudan.

Kristof's most recent column appeared in the New York Times Sunday Review on July 1st, and reflected on his latest African adventure within the "Win a Trip" contest. At the same time, and as he points out on his blog, the column was also an attempt to address a broader discontent about the way news media and journalists write about Africa.

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
23787
WEF URL: 
newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/07/africa.php

Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-07-07 12:50

Text: 

The New York Times, in a letter reported by Joshua Benton on the Nieman Lab, announced that starting Sunday June 26 the Week in Review section will be reinvented, being renamed Sunday Review and offering new features and a new way to present analysis and opinion pieces.

An internal memo already announced the overhaul of the section last February. The project was presented as a reinvention of the Sunday commentary section, produced jointly by the Op-Ed columnists, editorialists, outside opinion writers, all in the effort of expanding and enhancing the interaction with readers.

As the original memo to staff underlined, the important distinction between news and opinion will not be relaxed in the new section: "Reporters and editors who work in the newsroom will observe the boundary between analysis (which supplies context, explores trends, weighs assertions against evidence) and opinion (which may be partisan or ideological and advocate particular outcomes)", outgoing executive editor Bill Keller and editorial page editor Andy Rosenthal wrote.

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
23724
WEF URL: 
newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/06/has_the_distinction_between_news_and_ana.php

Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-06-21 18:43

Text: 

Twitter has been heralded as the best new tool for journalists to spread news, but does it exist outside the editorial process?

Many newspapers and broadcasting channels have Twitter accounts, generally used to "tweet" stories that have been reported or written. Sometimes, however, Twitter is the first source of information and thus becomes the initial broadcaster.

This was true in the French coverage of the DSK affair last May. The first news of DSK's arrest came from a French student's Twitter, who cited his friend in New York. Twitter has been the first news source for other stories in the American press, such as the Virginia Tech shootings in 2007 and the airplane landing in the Hudson River in 2009, but Work In Progress reported that the DSK story was the first time Twitter featured as the initial source of a high profile story in France.

Le Figaro noted that Twitter's role was not confined to the first few hours. Journalists continued to use the site to report "live", regardless of whether the Tweets came from French or American press. Inevitably, rumors become mistaken for facts, and this is when the differences between Twitter and traditional media reporting were highlighted.

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
23700
WEF URL: 
multimedia/2011/06/does_twitter_bypass_the_editorial_proces.php

Author

Florence Pichon

Date

2011-06-15 18:31

Text: 

In times of disaster, journalism becomes more crucial than ever. Journalists are necessary to relay information about safety and investigate responsibility.

Recognizing this, the UN recently published a manual, Disaster Through a Different Lens, for journalists covering disasters. The guide is 189 pages long and focuses heavily on disaster prevention, as disaster risk reduction is a "national obligation and a good story".

The first half of the guide is informational and summarizes the scope of disaster prevention, but reads a bit like a high school textbook. It summarizes the Hyogo Framework for Action, a plan of preparedness for disasters that countries the world over have agreed to implement. However, much of the advice it dispenses is general and would be better served if given to a government official than a journalist, such as "plan for land use" and "organize drills". However, the information could prove useful when investigating government preparedness or failure in future disasters.

The second half addresses the media's role in disaster reporting. Jonathan Baker, who until 2010 was the deputy head of newsgathering for the BBC, includes a piece about the media's responsibility. He divides the reporting into phases, from the "primary", in which the main objective is to disseminate information to raise awareness and detail where to find shelter, water, and food.

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
23666
WEF URL: 
newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/06/dissecting_the_uns_guide_for_disaster_re.php

Author

Florence Pichon

Date

2011-06-07 18:06

Text: 

During health pandemics and environmental catastrophes, a press debate arises every time over the thin line between informative and accurate reporting about risks and preventions and useless, if not damaging, alarmism.

We saw it during the Swine Flu of 2009 and the Avian Flu of 2003, and now it's the time of the E coli bacterium. According to the Guardian, it has killed 22 people and has infected people across 12 countries, causing alarm across Europe.

Information about the geographical origin of the outbreak is so far unclear, as is the information about which vegetable caused the epidemic.

After an initial assumption of a Spanish cucumber origin, the Guardian reported that it seems now that the outbreak was probably caused by bean sprouts grown in Germany, where the cases are centred.

Over the course of the past week, different vegetables were implicated as the source of the infection.

As Libération reported, citing AFP, the German newspapers provided extensive coverage investigating the different alleged origins of the outbreak.

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
23658
WEF URL: 
newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/06/the_e_coli_infection_and_its_coverage_in.php

Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-06-06 16:58

Text: 

One of the more encouraging developments in journalism in recent years has been the rise of the fact-checking movement, wrote Rem Rieder in the American Journalism Review.

Several fact-checking organizations have indeed flourished in recent years. Some, like FactCheck.org or PolitiFact.com, were born autonomously outside the mainstream media, while others are internal departments of newspapers and news media, like the Washington Post's Fact Checker column.

The aim of all of them is to conduct in-depth analysis into politicians' statements and claims and verifying their truthfulness, checking if the facts contained in those declarations are accurate or inaccurate.

PolitiFact even won a Pulitzer Prize in 2008 for national reporting during the presidential election and created an "Obameter" to help readers assess the Obama presidency.

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
23630
WEF URL: 
newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/05/information_misinformation_and_fact_chec.php

Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-05-27 17:02

Text: 

Bloomberg has launched a new opinion section of its website, Bloomberg View. The site's announcement said that Bloomberg View would feature contributions by regular columnists, op-ed articles and unsigned editorials.

Adweek reported a Bloomberg spokesperson saying that the launch was part of a redesign of the Bloomberg.com website. David Shipley, the New York Times's former op-ed page editor, will oversee the new section, and the full list of columnists and editorial board members can be found here.

Bloomberg's announcement went on to discuss the decision to include unsigned editorials, which for some may seem an old-fashioned feature. It argued that editorials could have an important role in providing the reader with a clear view of world affairs: "The job of an editorial - - is to describe the world clearly and honestly; to test its opinion against legitimate counterarguments."

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
23619
WEF URL: 
newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/05/bloomberg_view_launches_with_columns_op-.php

Author

Teemu Henriksson

Date

2011-05-25 14:02

Syndicate content

Editors Weblog

The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


© 2015 WAN-IFRA - World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers

Footer Navigation