WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Sun - 21.01.2018


editorial direction

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A small spat has arisen involving the Newspaper Guild of New York, Reuters and TheBaron.info, an independent website aimed at Reuters’ past and present employees, which raises interesting questions about Reuters’ editorial direction.

On February 23, The Baron posted an article stating that Reuters’ editor-in-chief Stephen Adler, deputy-editor-in-chief Paul Ingrassia and COO Stuart Karle told staff in a meeting that “Reuters is adopting a new editorial approach aimed at winning Pulitzer Prizes: long, in-depth, investigative special reports from all bureaux.”

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-10 17:43

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Denver Post editor Gregory L. Moore announced in a note yesterday that the paper is now putting local news on the front page. “Every day except Sunday, the front page and the first part of Section A generally will be devoted to our metro report, what we call Denver & the West. This change is an effort to reflect our continued emphasis on local news, including our business report,” he writes.

Why is the Denver Post making the switch? Andrew Phelps at Nieman Lab points out that “the Post’s national content is typically provided by The Associated Press, The Washington Post, and The New York Times. Often, these are commodity stories, stories that readers can easily find elsewhere on the web — and, in many cases, stories that readers aren’t seeing for the first time in the morning paper.” So it doesn’t make sense to put them on the front page, when the Post could be giving greater exposure to its most original and community-focused content - content that readers can’t find elsewhere. 

Moore confirms this idea, telling Phelps, “we really want to promote the fact that we are spending an inordinate amount of time and effort trying to promote our local communities, and this demonstrates it better than any words can say.”

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-04 15:33

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The news industry is transitioning from print to digital, and nobody said it was going to be easy. For one thing, many news publications still simply make more money from the shrinking paper side of their business than from the growing digital end. But as newspapers struggle to make the switch, perhaps part of the problem isn’t financial; it’s that newrooms are hooked on print. 

This is the argument made by two recent articles, one published by Nieman Lab, the other by Poynter, which suggest that journalists have been struggling to prioritise digital content because their professional environments reward them for achievements in the printed paper, but don’t incentivise their work online.

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-14 17:12

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The Associated Press' rigorous standards regarding social media just got a little bit tougher.

Most news organisations who are serious about advancing their digital strategy already encourage their staff to use social media in connection to their work and have guidelines to show them how to do it - take for instance the BBC, which has extensive social media guidelines. Then there's the social media editor, whose job it is to make social media efforts run smoothly.

"We don't just view social media as a publishing platform or distribution platform, but also as a newsgathering platform," Lou Ferrara, the AP's managing editor for sports, entertainment, and interactive media told The Editors Weblog in July after the organisation's last update to social media guidelines. Given that social media is such a valuable but complex and multipurpose tool, how specific should social media guidelines be? What should a good social media editor do to run the tightest ship in the twittersphere?

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/11/the_associated_press_and_social_media.php

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-11-04 13:38

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"Thou shalt not plagarise". This phrase surely must be somewhere near the top of the ten commandments of journalism.

Hence in 2005, when David Simpson, then-cartoonist for The Tulsa World, was found to have redrawn somebody else's work, the paper's publisher Robert E. Lorton III dismissed him, saying he had committed "the cardinal sin of a newsroom". The story was reported at the time by the AP and picked up by Sign On San Diego.

Still, there's no peace for the wicked; history has repeated itself. After his dismissal from The Tulsa World, Simpson was hired by the Urban Tulsa Weekly but, as Poynter reports, he was fired yesterday for further instances of copying other people's work.

And Simpson's not the only news professional recently brought up for plagiarism. Another Poynter article published on Monday points out that a journalist from the Journal Register Company's Middletown Press was found to have plagiarised "significant portions" of an article about a man charged with disorderly conduct from a local Patch website.

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/11/sharing_not_stealing_issues_of_plagiaris.php

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2011-11-02 19:22

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What is the hallmark of good journalism? Objectivity would be one of the standard replies: neutral journalism that is not partisan and that steers clear of disseminating personal opinions.

Actually, the answer is just not quite as simple as that. Hang on to your hats, people, it's time for an ethics class...

Wait a second, I hear you cry, before you take me back to journalism school - what's wrong with objectivity? Here's the thing: now it's obligatory for every journalist to have their hand hermetically sealed to a smartphone so they can dutifully maintain a Twitter account. It is becoming increasingly essential and easy to maintain an online presence; you need a Facebook page, a Linkedin profile and a FourSquare account. These are all useful tools in their own way. However, all this social media activity means that it is becoming ever harder to deny the fact that journalists are people. Shocking, I know, but it's true. Journalists are people - and people are not objective.

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newspaper/2011/11/objectivity_v_transparency_-_does_journa.php

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-11-02 18:06

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The trial of American student Amanda Knox has been the on-and-off focus of global media attention since 2007, when the murder of British student Meredith Kercher took place in the Italian city of Perugia. This latest trial is an appeal against a verdict given in 2009 that sentenced Knox to 26 years in jail for her alleged role in Kercher's murder. Knox's then boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, was also implicated in the crime and sentenced to 25 years.

Yesterday, the appeal verdict was delivered: not guilty. After four years in jail for Kercher's murder, Knox was released.

Naturally, the media were ready for the announcement. It's an old game, reporting the verdict of a big case. Gone are the days when newspapers would print two copies of their front page - one anticipating a guilty verdict and one in case the defendant were found not guilty - but the guessing, the preparation and the anticipation still remains. Now, in the age of instantaneous digital mobile news, the challenge is to be the news organisaion to break the story first - oh yes, and to be the one that publishes the correct information.


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newspaper/2011/10/the_trial_of_american_student.php

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-10-04 14:39

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The 10-year anniversary of the September 11 2001 terrorist attack is approaching and the news landscape is preparing for it.

The Knight Center offers an overview on how US news media are planning special coverage of the anniversary, while, as AP reported (via WSJ), Al Jazeera English, which didn't exist at the time of the attacks, aims to bring an "a global perspective to the anniversary that domestic networks likely won't". Facebook, in partnership with the National September 11 Memorial & Museum and social marketing platform Involver, as the Washington Post reported, launched a Web app asking people to share how they are remembering the 9/11 attacks.

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/09/an_anniversary_to_remember.php

Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-09-09 17:33

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When you think of the term 'social media editor', what comes to mind? Do you think of someone whose hand is hermetically sealed to their smart phone, answering questions, making contacts and fighting against a tide of tweets?

For many social media editors, things can get a little overwhelming at times, particularly when a news organisation wants all hands on Tweet Deck during a breaking story. As the role of the social media editor has become increasingly important, its parametres have widened and many editors now find themselves performing more tasks than ever.

Poynter highlights how journalists are being forced to debunk invalid information or fake images on Twitter, in quest for authenticity.

Some social media reporters have decided that merely deciding not to re-tweet or pass on incorrect information is not enough; it is necessary to denounce it publically via Twitter to stop the spread of misinformation. Andy Carvin of NPR and Anthony DeRosa of Reuters are amongst two avid Twitter users that famously debunk invalid information for all to see.

What does this mean in terms of journalistic practice?

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/09/the_role_of_social_media_editors.php

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-09-05 17:17

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Many people would say that travel journalists are some of the luckiest people around; they get paid to go on holiday, right?

Well, maybe sometimes, but Peter Greenberg, in an article on Poynter, argues that this perception is based on the media industry's own undervaluation of travel journalism.

Greenberg is the travel editor for CBS News, hosts the radio programme Peter Greenberg Worldwide which is syndicated across America, and has won an Emmy for his work in journalism.

The problem, Greenberg says, is that he is the only well-known journalist in his field; in his article he lists a host of news organisations - NBC, ABC, CNN and FOX- who are all without travel correspondents.

The situation is little better in the UK. Many publications, The Guardian included, simply offers what appears to be a holiday guide; a useful and well written holiday guide, but not exactly news. The BBC does have a travel news section, but it focuses primarily on road works. Its main travel section is produced in partnership with Lonely Planet - so yet again, it is more of a guidebook than industry-specific news.

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/08/travel_journalism_-_often_overlooked.php

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-08-26 13:58

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Editors Weblog

The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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