WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Tue - 21.10.2014


editorial direction

Unlike QR codes, AR uses a phone’s camera to recognize specific images (in this case, newspaper pages) and superimposes information over the camera feed. AR technology opens related links and content within its app, whereas QR codes externally connect to links on mobile web browsers. Industry analysts agree that AR has more potential for newspapers than QR codes, which have been deemed “dead” by most.

Independent+ uses iPhone, iPad and Android app Blippar to update select print stories with new information and additional multimedia features. The newspaper is also using the app to increase audience engagement by allowing readers to vote in polls related to opinion articles. The Independent said AR supplements will be available in all sections of the newspaper, according to Press Gazette.

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-04-26 15:36

“If you can’t stomach the gore, don’t run the photo. Period,” wrote Orange County Register Editor Charles Apple, who first brought attention to The Daily News’ photoshopping.

The Daily News declined to comment on its editorial decision, but the question of whether to publish graphic images is one many other editors confront.

FOR GORE

Some advocate for the publication of graphic photos, arguing that text can never show the true magnitude of a horror as visuals do.

“I think TV news distances and ‘shrink-wraps’ human suffering,” writes Zeynep Tufekci, a fellow at Princeton University’s Center for Information Technology Policy. “[A]nd I believe such mode of reporting is against the public interest.”

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-04-18 12:30

Reporters Lisa Song, Elizabeth McGowan and David Hasemyer’s seven-month investigation into the 2010 Kalamazoo oil spill revealed details that preceded national reports by weeks, despite InsideClimate News’ limited funding. Founder and Publisher David Sassoon estimated, salaries included, InsideClimate News spent only 10 percent of what a major newsroom would have budgeted for a similar investigation, according to Forbes.

With reporters and contributors now scattered across the globe, in Istanbul, New Delhi, Boston and San Diego, the startup has come a long way from its original two-person staff. But this recognition could thrust it even further forward: Sassoon told Forbes he envisions a staff of around 25 and a newsroom in New York.

“I think it’s a game changer,” Sassoon said of the award. “I think the Pulitzer Committee probably knew that. We earned the award. ... But I think they would understand how validation from them, the top honor in journalism, would make a big difference to us as a tiny startup.”

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-04-17 13:42

Before Oscar Pistorius’ murder trial began Tuesday, we heard about the rumpled bed sheets, the bloodied cricket bat, Reeva Steenkamp’s shattered skull. We heard whispers of the text message from a former lover that might have sparked an argument between couple, we read about the steroids that Pistorius might have been using that might have caused “‘roid rage.”

Before the trial began, we were told by a South African newspaper that the case against the athlete was “rock-solid.” And before the trial began, many issued guilty verdicts: Los Angeles radio station 98.7 FM tweeted Tuesday, “Today’s Douche of the Day is Pistorius for shooting his girlfriend and being all guilty about it later. Not cool.”

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-02-20 18:49

After The Sun plastered murder victim Reeva Steenkamp unzipping her bikini on its front page on Friday, Twitter exploded with comments from outraged users. The model shot to death by her boyfriend, Olympian “Blade Runner” Oscar Pistorius, was noted as an activist for women’s empowerment, yet a petition with more than 4,500 virtual signatures argues that her image exemplifies a persisting view “that women are worthless pieces of meat, who aren’t safe from objectification even after their death.”

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-02-18 16:43

Looking through lists of cute cat pictures, or 49 Things That Taste Like Christmas, and tags that include “LOL” or “trashy” or “wtf”, it would be easy to dismiss BuzzFeed as beneath the attention of serious editors and journalists.

But listening to the site’s editorial director, Scott Lamb, speaking in Paris at Sciences Po university’s New Practices in Journalism conference last week, it became evident that there is more to the site than first meets the eye, and that it can offer lessons that could be useful for publishers of all journalistic products.

Lamb was clear that BuzzFeed doesn’t aim to simply provide mindless entertainment. “We think of ourselves as a news organisation,” he said. “We are not going to be able to compete with The Wall Street Journal, but we can cover things that other people don’t.” It is this sentiment that led to the hiring of Ben Smith, a well-regarded political journalist who had been at Politico, as editor-in-chief in December 2011.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-12-18 10:51

How to be successful online? It’s a question newspapers worldwide are asking and the answer may not be much more complicated than something we already know how to do: good editing.

This insight comes from a recent World Editors Forum study tour of multimedia newsrooms in the United States, during which we visited The Huffington Post as well as several other media organizations. 

The HuffPost is one of the most successful news websites in the world. Much has been written about the fact it that aggregates a great deal of its content. As the argument goes, The Huffington Post is getting rich off the work of our journalists. However, that generalization hardly explains its success. The site is edited with sophistication, imagination and attention to detail, just like a good newspaper.

This became clear one morning as I prepared for our group of overseas journalists to visit The Huffington Post as well as the New York Daily News. I was struck by the similarities of their websites. Both covered many of the same stories in a similar fashion. The stories were intriguing, headlines were creative and pictures captured the visitor’s attention. 

Author

Randy Covington

Date

2012-12-06 10:27

The latest dramatic twist in the BBC saga has seen the new director general resign and other senior staff step aside. What might be surprising is that it was not the now notorious Jimmy Savile case that actually brought them down, but the misidentification of a child abuser as a former prominent conservative politician.

BBC DG George Entwistle resigned on Saturday after it was confirmed that the BBC’s flagship news programme Newsnight had incorrectly implicated Lord McAlpine, a former Tory treasurer, in a story about paedophilia. 

There has been considerable criticism of Entwistle's £450,000 pay off (a year’s salary) from members of parliament and the National Audit Office is due to look into the justification for the sum.

Tim Davie, who was director of audio and music, has stepped in as acting director general and has pledged to “get a grip” on the news operation and its journalism. It seems clear that Davie is a temporary solution, as BBC chairman Lord Patten is actively seeking candidates, the Guardian reported yesterday.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-11-12 20:12

It was 1978, and as a 22-year-old research manager I was despatched to meet the formidable Editor of The Scotsman for the first time. Having squirmed in my seat as I explained what I vaguely understood about the latest readership figures, and detecting a friendly response, I asked the great man: “What is it like to run Scotland’s national newspaper?”

“Run a newspaper?” he boomed. “I run a COUNTRY!”

I’ve found myself recounting this story on various occasions recently, to an editor of a major national daily, and the owner of a group of local weeklies, among others. All of these conversations shared a common theme: namely the role of the editor in the modern world. And they all came to a different version of the same conclusion: that the role of the editor was diminishing.

When Eric MacKay was appointed, 155 years after The Scotsman’s launch he was its thirteenth editor, and held the job for 14 years. In the 27 years since he retired, there have been a further thirteen. Few of these later incumbents lasted more than two years in the job.

In the UK the spotlight has recently focussed on the role and regulation of the press, primarily the national tabloids, but despite government assurances to the contrary, a widespread fear is that the consequence of the various enquiries now reaching conclusion will be greater regulation, with further limitations on news-gathering and story telling.

Author

Guest

Date

2012-10-16 11:22

Die Zeit’s paper and online editions are better off as independent entities, said Wolfgang Blau, editor of Zeit Online. The weekly print paper is run out of Hamburg, while the website is based in Berlin. Blau was speaking at the International Journalism Festival in Perugia, Italy, on a panel on the future of weeklies.

Many European newspapers are moving towards a more integrated structure, but Blau argued that the culture and reporting structures are different in print and online, and hence it makes sense to keep them somewhat separate, although of course with collaboration between the two. As the paper’s circulation is growing and revenue is still going up, the approach seems to be working for Die Zeit.

One third of Die Zeit's editors frequently contribute articles written exlusively for Zeit Online, Blau said, a number which is much higher than at the paper’s competitors. The Economist’s website, for example, is full of content produced by the print journalists, who embrace the opportunity to write blog posts and more, said the paper’s social media editor Mark Johnson.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-05-02 09:35

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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