WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Sun - 20.04.2014


digital

Success for a news organisation in today's highly-competitive, highly-digital news landscape is increasingly dependent not only on having top quality content but also in presenting this to audiences in the most effective way - in the most compelling format, via the right device, at the right time. Raju Narisetti, head of The Wall Street Journal Digital Network, and former managing editor of The Washington Post, is well aware of this. (The network includes WSJ.com, MarketWatch.com, the language editions of WSJ.com, WSJLive Video platforms, and WSJ and MarketWatch Radio Networks.)

Ahead of a webinar on Wednesday, 16 January, which will feature a range of participants discussing the newsroom of the future, we asked Narisetti a few questions about the role of metrics and other top concerns for editors and newsroom managers today.

WAN-IFRA: How significant a role do metrics/analytics play in your day-to-day job?

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2013-01-14 13:13

Jeff Whatcott would say that - after all, he is the Chief Marketing Officer at video hosting giant Brightcove. We were speaking to him on a study tour visit to their HQ in Boston last month.

But of course most news organisations with a strong online presence agree. For example, Kalle Jungkvist - Senior Advisor to Schibsted Media Group and Frenemies Consultant with WAN-IFRA, says "integrated news videos and integrated web TV is more or less a must for a modern news site" (see video below from his interview at DME12).

And the trend is growing fast. Chris Berend, Head of Digital Video Production and Content Development at Bloomberg, says they recently "more than doubled amount of video streams being consumed across web and mobile properties".

More and more news media companies are working with partners like Brightcove to optimise their video content and Jeff was happy to share some of his hints and tips for getting the best from your video strategy, for instance:-

Author

Nick Tjaardstra's picture

Nick Tjaardstra

Date

2012-11-28 17:17

Just before a networking coffee break in the Chicago Ballroom Foyer this afternoon, Brian Brett, Executive Director of Customer Research for The New York Times, will present the results of a “News Eco-System Study” to attendees of the INMA Audience Summit.

Commissioned by The New York Times, the study was an online survey conducted in the spring by the Knowledge Network, reaching over 3,000 U.S. residents aged 18 to 65 (of whom 85 percent are regular news consumers). Its purpose was to find out how people are consuming news, across platforms and between generations.

Thanks to a preview from Poynter’s Jeff Sonderman, here are four early points from the study’s findings:

1. Facebook is the dominant social network for news, especially for young people and mobile users

Fifteen percent of digital news consumers find news through social media, and Facebook is the place they are most likely to look.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-05 15:42

Even The New York Times’ Public Editor Margaret Sullivan reads the newspaper digitally first. “Certainly before I leave the house in the morning, I’ve gone to The Times website and given it a pretty good read,” she told The Atlantic Wire. “I see it on the web before I see it in print.”

Sullivan is part of a majority (55 percent) of The Times’ regular readers who now click or tap through the paper in web or app form more often than they thumb through it in print, according to a Pew survey published yesterday.

While The Times is presently the only one of America’s three highest-circulation newspapers to have passed the half-way point in its readers’ screenward migration, the nation’s two biggest dailies are close behind: 48 percent of regular USA Today readers claim to access the publication mostly in digital form (tied with 48 percent who lean toward print), and 44 percent of Wall Street Journal readers favour digital, compared with 54 percent who still mostly read the country’s highest-circulation daily in print.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-09-28 17:25

The transition from print to digital in the face of falling ad revenues and declining print circulation is causing a great deal of pain at established, professional news organisations. Think of the 600 cuts announced yesterday at Advance Publications in New Orleans and Alabama, or the recent cuts made at Johnston Press.

Yet this same switch to digital is being mirrored by some student publications - which are not bemoaning the end of print, but positively embracing it.

Nieman Lab reported last week that the University of Oregon’s student newspaper The Daily Emerald is cutting down print production and moving to digital despite not being in debt, having a “solid reserve fund” in the bank and just having experienced its best financial year in over a decade.

Rather than responding to immediate financial pressure, the Emerald says that it is making the switch “to deliver on our mission to serve our community and prepare our student staff for the professional world.”

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-06-13 18:14

NPR announced yesterday that has it hired the Chicago Tribune’s Brian Boyer to direct a new team, dedicated to building news applications. NPR has produced news apps previously, such as this interactive look at the science of “Fracking” to extract gas, and this map of air-polluting facilities in the US. However, the staff who have worked on these types of projects haven’t been coordinated in a single department, and Boyer’s appointment will bring them together.

Mark Stencel, NPR’s Managing Editor for digital news, who will be in charge of Boyer and his team, tells Poynter; “what I’m hoping is that, by taking these positions and putting them together as a team, we’ll be able to do a higher level of [work] than we’ve been able to do with scattered design, database and development resources.”

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-23 10:37

The story breaks – a fire, earthquake, shooting or protest – and the race begins. You need to speak with someone who is at the scene, right now. Sifting through social media content can be a slow and painstaking process, with no guarantee that you will find an eyewitness source. Enter Geofeedia; a tool that allows journalists to zoom in on social media users posting geographically tagged tweets, photos and videos in a specified area.

Formally launched last week after months of testing, Geofeedia aggregates location-linked posts from Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, Flickr and Picasa. By entering an address or drawing a circle on a map, you can call up the content being generated in your target region in real time. The creators vaunt it as a valuable tool for tracking down sources and images when text searches such as keywords and hashtags do not suffice.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-05-21 16:16

News can reach you as an article, a picture, or a video, or it could be from a tweet or a Facebook update.

Taking this into account is what inspired open journalism: the new editorial approach The Guardian is experimenting with which is based on the centrality of a two-way relationship between the newspaper and the readers.

In a video published on the website, editor-in-chief Alan Rusbridger illustrates the changes journalism is undergoing which have put at its core the audience, which is now taking part in journalism rather than being passive recipients.
"Journalists are not the only experts in the world", Rusbridger says, stressing that for a newspaper, embracing this new mindset means being more open to discussion and participative, asking the readers to collaborate in the way the paper is shaped everyday.

The new approach can result in asking for a video taken by a city trader in New York capturing the moment the police struck a news seller in the middle of a crowd, or building a little widget with which 23,000 readers helped in processing the 400,000 documents of MPs expenses which had been released all at once.

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2012-03-01 19:13

The crucial marriage between print and digital and the path to integration does not involve just news organizations and brands. It is also a question of attitude, and therefore people.

Nicholas Kristof, well-known reporter for the New York Times, provides an example of an experienced journalist who is embracing new digital opportunities.

David D. Burnstein of Fast Company spoke to him about how print and traditional journalism (and journalists) can jump into the digital world and social networks.

Kristof's background would stand the most traditional test of trustworthy journalism: his coverage on the genocide in Darfur won him a Pulitzer Prize, as did his reporting on protests in Tiananmen Square in 1989 which he wrote with his wife. He teaches young journalists how to report from developing countries through his Win a Trip contest project.

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2012-01-12 18:41

The New Haven Register announced a reorganization of its newsroom yesterday. The move includes the formation of three new teams: one dedicated to investigative journalism, one to promote user engagement, and one to handle breaking news.

The new investigative and in-depth reporting division will be the first team officially dedicated to investigative reporting at The Register in 20 years. It will feature articles in an "explainer" format, to look deeper at issues that affect the paper's readership, as well as fact-checking statements by public figures to hold them to account.

The move perhaps contradicts ideas from commentators like Dean Starkman (in this article at least) that the move towards digital journalism puts the media in danger of leaving serious reporting by the wayside: "Public-interest reporting isn't just another tab on the home page," writes Starkman.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2011-11-29 14:33

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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