WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Wed - 23.07.2014


digital media

Even if a journalist manages to track down an expert in the relevant field of knowledge, it is not guaranteed that this individual will be at ease as an interviewee on TV or radio. New Canadian start-up, mediaspotme.com – launched just over a month ago, on 11 March 2013 – provides a much-needed solution to this common problem, which continues to compromise the quality of journalists' efforts to write in an informed manner on specific areas (often niche topics such as robotics, which is the example provided by the website’s explanatory video). Media Spot Me makes expert research readily accessible to journalists, offering a diversity of points of view on a wealth of disciplines.

The relationships established by Media Spot Me are far from one-way. Whilst the specialist brings a "fresh voice" and a plethora of knowledge to the journalist's piece, they too profit from this collaboration with the media – the site points out that "media exposure helps [the expert] to be seen as a leader in [their] field," hereby winning them added credibility in the wider world. Media Spot Me helps the journalist to "[find] the person with the right expertise" and to profit from this expertise, whilst the expert gains visibility and may get job offers off the back of their interview with the journalist.

Author

Emily Moore

Date

2013-04-15 16:52

The creator of both the website and magazine is Jesus Maraña, former director of Público, an online newspaper in Spain. After the dissolution of Público last year, Maraña met with Mediapart to launch infoLibre. Relying on reader subscriptions rather than ads, the online newspaper is dedicated to reporting the news without political or financial backers. Listed on their website are eight journalistic principles that infoLibre promises to maintain. The majority of infoLibre’s staff comes from other major Spanish newspapers.

In an interview with Mediapart, Maraña said journalism in Spain suffers from a “weakness” which affects how readers get their news. With Spain facing an increasing economic crisis, Maraña partnered with other journalists to create a one-stop source for news.

infoLibre is divided into five categories; politics, economy, culture, society, and the media. The site also has a “true or false” tab where they take articles and rate them based on their validity. The print version, Tinta Libre, allows non-members of infoLibre to access exclusive content different from that of the website.

In an interview with El Mundo, Maraña expressed hope that the quality content of infoLibre will result in potential subscribers. The site will also publish its annual accounts.

Author

Briana Seftel

Date

2013-03-11 18:04

The first Latin American Forum on Digital Media and Journalism took place last Friday, 23 November, in Mexico City. Organised by the magazine Distintas Latitudes, Mexican digital publication Animal Político, and the Iberoamericana University in Mexico City, the Forum granted an open invitation to discuss the state of journalism in Latin America and to consider the benefits and obstacles in conducting investigative journalism exclusively from digital platforms. The Forum concluded with ideas for new business models, more accountable, transparent reporting, and the need to return to the basics of quality journalism.

The Forum has been conceived at a time when the issue of organised crime is prevalent in the lives of Latin Americans and largely absent from local print newspapers. Why is this the case?

Author

Gilda Di Carli's picture

Gilda Di Carli

Date

2012-11-30 16:45

Did you know that only 29 percent of Lady Gaga’s 30 million followers on Twitter actually exist? Let me just repeat that: 29 percent. That’s less than a third. The overwhelming majority are unreal, inert, mere cyphers shackled together in a collective expression of inanimate inanity. Isn’t that extraordinary?

Well, no, actually. Earlier this year, StatusPeople introduced a web tool called the Fake Follower Check that claims to ascertain how many fake followers you and your friends have. Lady Gaga, it turns out, is far from unusual: a writer at Forbes used the application to determine that 70 percent of Justin Bieber's 27 million followers are fake, as are 88 percent of Britney Spears', and 74 percent of Oprah Winfrey's.

Now, clearly, there are many plausible explanations why an account might be ‘fake’. Vast quantities of automated spam permeate the site’s chasmic recesses, and many once-genuine profiles are simply inactive. Recently, however, a more insidious manifestation of this fakery has come to light: namely, the phenomenon of ‘followers for sale’.

Author

Frederick Alliott's picture

Frederick Alliott

Date

2012-11-22 19:11

My first instinct upon waking this morning was, “Need newspaper. Now.” And then I remembered that it’s 2012, and that I’m supposed to be a "digital native" millennial-type, so I reached for my iPhone. Without the intermediary of a foot-chilling front stoop, I was then immersed in a torrent of triumphant and cantankerous tweets, a red-and-blue chequered electoral map, and a New York Times video interview with a humbly vindicated blogger.

In the wee hours of November 7, 2012, while nocturnal printers churned out front pages of a beaming Barack, and radio and television airwaves resonated with the sound of his voice, almost every media player in the country (and many beyond) was concurrently converging on another, more instantaneous playing field. News organisations large and small, legacy and start-up, greeted Wednesday with virtual front pages proclaiming Obama’s victory, and promising a clickable cornucopia of elections-related multimedia tempting enough to drive even the most disciplined worker to procrastination. And then there were the memes... 

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-11-07 17:12

What have been the biggest changes in the media over the last ten years? Will the Internet be held responsible for killing the newspaper? Did a new fragmented audience determine the end of the mass audience?

These are just a few of the questions a new report published on October 11 by the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism at the University of Oxford tried to answer, analyzing  “Ten years that shook the media world”. It covers eight countries across the world from mature media markets - the United States, the United Kingdom, Finland, France, Italy and Germany - and emerging economies Brazil and India.

Clearly, the news industry has undergone a vast amount of change over the last decade. Some trends are long-lived, such as the ongoing fragmentation of most television audience, the decline of paid print newspaper circulation or the rise of Internet access and use. Others are more recent, such as the emergence of a few dominant search engines, the relentless expansion of social media sites and the spread of mobile web access. All these trends have been observed on a global scale; nevertheless they developed differently in different countries accordingly to the peculiarity of each media system. 

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2012-10-15 13:17

French aggregation startup Youmag is seeking to integrate free and paid digital news content in a made-to-measure, virtual magazine format.

Co-founders Antoine Levêque, Nicolas Schaettel and Guillaume Multrier have recently unveiled versions for the web and Android, and Youmag’s free iPhone and iPad apps, launched this past June, were downloaded over 100,000 times in two months.

The concept is simple: personalised aggregation + curation and editorial intervention by a small team of journalists + a freemium model akin to that of music streaming platform Spotify = ideally, a successful company that generates 2/3 of its revenue from advertising, and 1/3 from happy readers inclined to pay for premium content (thereby making publishers happy, too).

Personalised, nuanced aggregation

Let’s say that you are the user. After logging in for the first time, you are invited to select the sections of your magazine from a carousel of themes and sub-themes.

“What really distinguishes us is the thematic approach,” Levêque told me in a phone interview last week. The selection of sub-themes is diverse and nuanced as possible "to be as relevant as possible for users," elaborated Schaettel in a subsequent conversation.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-09 12:05

5. Memory lane, by ABC News via the Huffington Post

Let’s start from the beginning: Nixon slammed his knee on a car door for the second time, and an aid applied a coat of “lazy shave” to hide his six o’clock shadow. Meanwhile, JFK was changing from a white shirt into a light blue one to avoid glare in his televised image.

September 26, 1960 marked a milestone in political journalism: it was the first time that a pair of U.S. presidential hopefuls had ever faced off before their country for a live, televised debate.

The candidates were John Fitzgerald Kennedy and Richard Millhous Nixon. For American voters, it was an unprecedented opportunity to watch their two presidential candidates duke it out, from the comfort of their homes.

Ten sets of televised debates later, not only do many American voters still tune in from their living rooms, but tens of millions of people around the world stream the action- and participate in the commentary it engenders- from a plethora of devices.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-04 15:36

At first glance, it sounds like the end of the road. Either $500k was a bargain for a site that was once the 24th most popular website in the US, or it was in terminal decline.

But look again and you see that the site was bought by the startup developer Betaworks - with the clear intention of merging with their social news aggregator news.me. There's potentially a big synergy there - a site that encourages users to vote up the best stories on the web (with a Newsroom section in beta) and a site that collates all the news your contacts are sharing and sends it to you in a daily email.

But there are two interesting differences that have relevance to other aggregators in an increasingly crowded market:-

1) news.me is focused on news stories (as you might expect from the name). It does not have digg's ambitious aim to "discover and share content from anywhere on the web". This makes it clearly relevant to publishers, and more of a Taptu than a Flipboard.

Author

Nick Tjaardstra's picture

Nick Tjaardstra

Date

2012-07-18 17:53

Which publications are read where? A collaboration between Forbes and Bitly analysed millions of clicks on Bitly shortened links shared on the Web to explore which news sources are read where across the US.

Bitly is a website which shortens URLs, making it easier to share them on the Web. It is widely used on Twitter for example, where saving space is crucial to get the most out of 140 characters. Bitly provides also tools to track links: by adding a + at the end of a link, it’s possible to see how many times the link was clicked on, Bitly explains.

The data collected for Forbes have been aggregated to form an interactive map showing America’s most influential news outlets.

As Forbes’ Jon Bruner explains, Bitly’s dataset consists of every click on every Bitly link on the Web mainly shared on social networks like Facebook or Twitter. For Forbes – Bitly said – they investigated how people consume news by looking at how people in different states differ in their preference for news sites.

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2012-03-28 16:54

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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