WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Wed - 23.07.2014


digital editions

One news app, three editions. This is the concept behind ABC’s News’ new app, which comes in three versions: morning, midday and evening.

Why the change? “We realized that people are using the app in different ways at different points of the day,” said ABC’s senior vice president of digital, Joe Ruffolo to Jeff Sonderman at Poynter

ABC News has had almost two years to observe how its audience is engaging with its content on the iPad, after launching its first iPad app in July 2010, as paidContent points out. The article says ABC News’ digital team found that iPad use peaks in the evening, between 7pm and 10pm, when users watched one and a half times more video, and read 20% more stories than at any other time of day. The team also found that half of all news stories consumed on the iPad were read in the morning and evening.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-06-15 17:00

Time Magazine released its new subscription plan today, which allows readers unilateral access to the magazine across any platform, be it digital, print, or tablet.

With the current variety of platforms to consume news, newspapers and magazines are stepping up their efforts to attract readers willing to pay for content. Some publications have separate subscription plans for digital content, while others choose to provide online news for free but charge for access through apps.

Time Magazine is the latest to join the ranks of the "all-access" publications, which allow print subscribers full online and tablet apps (for $30 a year, in Time Magazine's case). Those wishing to "taste test" the model can opt for monthly access, in which they will receive the print, full access to TIME.com, and tablet editions for $2.99 - an attractive pricetag for new customers determining where to consume news. Those who only wish to access the website for a short time are the most penalized, as the week-long pass costs $4.99.

Author

Florence Pichon

Date

2011-07-20 13:56

After almost a year of collaboration, the French ePresse application has been released on the iPhone and iPad.

ePresse, a digital newsstand, is the product of eight press organizations collaborating to build their own platform. In the announcement last week, the leaders stressed their desire to take advantage of the growing appetite for digital press. In doing this, they hope to create value for quality content on digital mediums.

The publications currently available on the site include five national daily papers (L'Equipe, Le Figaro, Liberation, Le Parisien, Les Echos) and three news magazines (Le Point, Le Nouvel Obs, and L'Express). Le Monde, another national daily paper, is notably absent.

Frédéric Filloux spoke about the project and its unique features. On ePresse, users can read summaries of the articles in all the papers for free. Users also have the possibility to see old editions of the paper and resize the text thanks to the inclusion of an xml layer. The articles can be sent via email without a "restrictive" PDF format, which prevents easy sharing on social media platforms. Each editor sets the price for his daily paper.

Author

Florence Pichon

Date

2011-07-05 18:55

For airlines looking to reduce fuel and paper costs but keep customers happy, digital in-flight magazines and newspapers could well be a wise investment.

The situation seems to be win-win for publications and airlines. The FIPP's report Innovations in Magazines estimated that airlines could save about $440,00 a year for every 11.5 kilograms of paperweight taken off of a plane. Airplanes carry huge amounts of paper; according to The New York Times, long haul aircrafts carry up to 400 kilograms, and sometimes more.

The best way to eliminate this paper need is to take advantage of digital options. Personal televisions are becoming ubiquitous on flights. While frequent fliers are accustomed to the variety of TV shows, movies, games, and radio offered on the in-flight entertainment systems, newspapers and magazines have been absent thus far.

Now, with the new file compression technology developed by SmarttPapers Aviation, airlines can begin to offer digital magazine and newspaper reading. The publications are high-resolution and easy-to-read.

Author

Florence Pichon

Date

2011-06-24 11:57

Magazines will fare better than newspapers in the struggle to monetize digital content, according to a report released by Pricewaterhouse Coopers. The annual outlook on entertainment and media predicts that newspapers' digital subscriptions will not compensate for decreasing circulation revenues.

On Forbes.com, Jeff Bercovici breaks down the numbers. The report forecasts that initially, digital subscriptions will grow quickly. For the next five years, both magazines and newspapers will see their largest revenue gains in selling digital subscriptions. By 2015, PwC expects magazines to take in $611 million from digital editions (they took in about $4 million last year). Newspapers have a much stronger starting point, already racking in $150 million from digital subscriptions last year. However, PwC predicts their growth to reach only about $331 million in 2015, which would not cover the expected print sales decline.

Author

Florence Pichon

Date

2011-06-16 16:22

"Newspapers are proving so resilient that the term "dying newspaper industry" will be retired in the next year or two", the Toronto Star announced, quoted by the Guardian's Roy Greenslade. The newspapers referred to are those in Canada, which seems, as Greenslade notes, to become a sort of last refuge for printed newspapers.

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-02-14 14:19

Romenesko on Poynter.org reported the year-end message of Associated Press CEO Tom Curley to the staff, where he says: "We have completed the second consecutive year of rate cuts to help members and customers cope with the economic downturn and the disruption as we shift to a digital world. And we have had to face the consequences of these challenges internally. But we are determined to resume our growth path."

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2010-12-16 17:43

The Center for Public Integrity's first HTML5 project is live. The idea behind the project is to make reading long-form journalism enjoyable on any digital platform, by creating an app-like experience in a web browser. There has been some concern among news organisations that online, at least, it is more difficult to appreciate long in-depth articles than it is in print.

Applications, particularly for tablets, are perceived as offering a more comfortable and convenient reading experience for longer work, and less distraction. This belief is reflected by the launch a service founded earlier this year called Longform.org works with Instapaper to allow interested readers to select long-form stories on the Longform site, which are then stored in the reader's account to read at their leisure on their iPhone or iPad via Instapaper.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-11-09 16:15

The Evening Standard is to launch an iPad app this week, reported MediaWeek. The app, which will feature a range of editorial content including news, sport, business and entertainment, is the first of two: the second will be launched at a later date and will focus on the paper's Friday ES magazine.

The first app will launch this week and will be updated 24 hours a day, offering both content from the print paper and unique features and news, MediaWeek said. It will allow users to share and post on Facebook and Twitter. British Airways is sponsoring the app, and will be the sole advertiser for the first two months.

The London paper is the latest in a string of publications to announce the launch of an app. Yesterday, the Telegraph announced the launch of its free app, with Audi as the launch sponsor. The Telegraph Media Group is also said to be working in collaboration with the New York Times on a new iPhone and iPad app.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-09-22 18:18

Already selling single editions on the iPad, The Atlantic plans to launch a premium version of its mobile magazine, Stacy Kramer has reported on paidContent.org. "In coming weeks, the magazine publisher plans to convert single-issue app sales to an iPad digital newsstand app--and to launch Atlantic Premium, a daily bundle of everything the magazine produces online for a monthly access fee," the article stated.

Launched last month, The Atlantic's iPad edition has so far received a relatively positive reception. "It was better than I expected," Scott Havens, VP of digital strategy and operations, was quoted as saying in reference to sales figures. "We're watching what other people are doing and the success of different pricing models. One thing we're very keen to do is establish value for our content," he continued.

Author

Dawn Osakue

Date

2010-09-07 14:35

Syndicate content

Editors Weblog

The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


© 2013 WAN-IFRA - World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers

Footer Navigation