WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Sat - 25.10.2014


circulation

Following a week of much speculation over whether the new London freesheet existed, and if so, if it would launch at all, the London Weekly is finally here, says Guardian.

The launch of the new freesheet was announced in November of last year, with its website opening in December. Executives at the Global Publishing Group, the company responsible for the publication, initially announced the freesheet would launch on February 1st, but later pushed back the start date to February 5th.
The London Weekly hopes to fill the gap left by the closure of the capital's previous freesheets, the London Paper and the London Lite, with around 250,000 copies distributed every Friday and Saturday.

Author

Maria Conde

Date

2010-02-05 18:30

The London Evening Standard's readership has gone from 556,000 in April to September to 1.37 million in the last three months of 2009, Stephen Brook from Guardian reports.

These positive readership figures follow the newspaper going free in October of last year and more than doubling its circulation to 600,000 copies in the process. The London Evening Standard was bought by Russian billionaire Alexander Lebeveb in 2008, and his decision to drop the paper's 50p cover price was made in the hope that boosted circulation would increase advertising enough to make up for the lost revenue of having no cover price. His move towards the freesheet format prompted speculation that other London quality newspapers may drop their cover price as well.
In November, about a month after going free, the Evening Standard announced it had managed to reduce its distribution costs significantly - from 30 pence per copy to 4p.

Author

Maria Conde

Date

2010-02-04 18:25

In a time where newspapers seem to be losing more and more revenue, figures from Gannett Co. Inc.'s fourth quarter released today, showed potential positive results for the months ahead.

According to The Wall Street Journal, Gannett swung to a profit in the fourth quarter following $5.6 billion in prior-year write-downs. Lower declines in advertising sales combined with much lower expenses helped the newspaper publisher show improvement.

Lower expenses seem to stem from Gannett's aggressive job cuts. In the summer of 2009, Gannett slashed over 1,000 jobs, adding to the 4,600 jobs cut in 2008. USA Today's newsroom was reduced by about 20% in only two years. Last December, Gannett executives remained pessimistic about the state of the company, citing a drop in travel and a decrease in circulation as the two biggest problems.

However, Gannett's executives are much more hopeful now. E&P reports that Gannet's President and COO, Martore, said that the company's publishing division's executives believe Q1 may exceed their projections by a couple of percentage points.

Author

Maria Conde

Date

2010-02-02 15:15

The New York Times has gained another 1100 subscribers in the San Francisco Bay Area after launching a local section for the area last autumn, the San Francisco Business Times reports.

A senior Times executive, Jim Schachter, told the Business Times that it wasn't just subscriptions that have risen. "Single-copy sales are up too," he said. "We're delighted at the reception we're getting from Bay Area readers for the pages that Felicity Barringer is editing, and for our Bay Area blog." San Francisco-based technology reporters also write for the paper's business section.
The Times previously had around 40,000 daily subscribers in the region, but has picked up the extra numbers since it introduced the Bay Area Report section in mid-October.

The section was designed to test the advertising market in San Francisco and to raise readership numbers. No word on advertising yet, but it's clear that the paper has been successful in increasing circulation.

Author

Elizabeth Redman

Date

2010-02-01 12:23

Yesterday, following months of deliberation, the New York Times announced that it was to go forward with charging online, with a plan to implement a metre system in 2011. It is the biggest publisher yet to lay out paywall plans, and the move is undoubtedly highly significant for the newspaper industry as it struggles with a failing business model. Will this save the New York Times? Could it signal the end for free online content?

Similar to that used by the Financial Times, a metered payment system would allow readers to access a certain number of articles free per month, and then request payment for more: a flat fee for unlimited access. Print subscribers will continue to have free access, even those who subscribe to just the Sunday paper. An online subscription will also cover access via smartphones. The first click free from search engines, which is used by the Wall Street Journal, will also apply. More details such as pricing have been released yet, and the publisher's statement said that the next year will be used to build "a new online infrastructure designed to provide consumers with a frictionless experience across multiple platforms."

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-01-21 14:01

Will the World Cup boost South African newspaper sales, wonders Peter Bruce, editor of Johannesburg's Business Day, writing in the Guardian today. He points out that bulk sales, which are still allowed to count as real sales in ABCs, are the only sales that are rising. "We can't wait for the World Cup and, especially, the English supporters," he says.

He writes that editors have put aside their former doubts over South Africa's suitability to host the World Cup given its high crime rate, and that "We editors want the World Cup to be a Great Success."

"Newspaper proprietors are desperate to make money out of the World Cup," he says, "but it won't be easy." For a start, "Fifa will rule with an iron fist" and any association with the event will come at a price. And, Bruce says, it is unlikely that locals will buy more papers unless South Africa's team does "miraculously" well. So will foreign fans buy them? Maybe, believes Bruce, but he also suggests that many fans might not have to buy papers as publishers will give them away in order to make ABCs look good.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-01-04 12:15

Both All Nippon Airways and Japan Airlines will be ending their free in-flight distribution of newspapers in economy class sections on January 4, reported Pressnet. Both will continue to give away newspapers to first and business class passengers and papers will be available in airport lounges.

ANA officials told Pressnet that the airline decided to cut back its free newspaper service due to the availability of other sources of information via mobile phones and Internet portal sites. "We are changing our conventional in-flight services, including the free distribution of newspapers, in order to provide other forms of new services," an ANA official said.

JAL told Pressnet that the cutback is part of the company's all-out effort to reduce expenditure, and that all kinds of services were being scrutinized.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2009-12-21 11:07

It's not just the UK tabloids that saw a fall in circulation in November, as News of the World and the Sun dropped below 3 million copies each. Quality daily newspapers in the UK are suffering falling daily circulation as well, Peter Preston reports in The Guardian.

Circulation for national dailies is down 4.2% this year, while Sunday papers are down 7%. Circulation for The Guardian is down 14.8%, the Independent is down 7.2%, the Times has fallen 9.4%, and the Financial Times has dropped 9.2%.

It's not always fair to make this kind of comparison, Preston comments, considering that November 2008 was the month that President Obama was elected, and sales were likely to be up. What he doesn't mention, though, is that circulation has to be measured consistently, and audit dates can't be moved around each year to take major news events into account.

Prices have gone up, he points out, which provides one reason for declining circulation during a recession. The Guardian is up from 80 pence to £1, the Times is up from 80 pence to 90 pence, and the Financial Times has increased from £1.50 to £2.

Author

Elizabeth Redman

Date

2009-12-14 17:05

Circulation of London freesheet the London Evening Standard is slightly under target, according to November figures from the UK Audit Bureau of Circulations.

In the first full month since it dropped its 50 pence cover price and went free, the newspaper's recorded distribution was 596,100 copies. Its target was 600,000 copies.

According to the Evening Standard's own figures, though, its distribution was 618,837. The extra copies have not yet been confirmed by the auditing group because of the paper's complex distribution method.

The newspaper went free in October and more than doubled its circulation from 250,000 to 600,000, while reducing the number of distribution outlets. Another increase to a distribution of 800,000 or 1 million copies by late 2010 is also under consideration.

This news comes just after The Guardian reported that London newsagents are paying 2 pence a copy to stock the freesheet in the hopes of attracting customers. By contrast, the Evening Standard used to pay newsagents a commission to stock the paper.

Author

Elizabeth Redman

Date

2009-12-14 12:14

Print newspaper circulation is down across the U.S., Editor and Publisher reports, in an article that examines reasons for, and responses to, the fall.

According to the October figures from the Audit Bureau of Circulations, weekday circulation is down just over 10% year-on-year, the first drop to reach double digits. Some newspapers suffered falls double that size. Sunday circulation is also down 7%.

Print circulation has been affected by the migration of readers to online news websites, and increasingly to mobile news applications and e-readers. Indeed, the data shows that the combined audiences for online and print products often rose.

But the figures for print dropped the farthest in modern history, according to the report. Interesting, then, that its headline screams "Print NOT Dead!"

Author

Elizabeth Redman

Date

2009-12-09 18:39

Syndicate content

© 2013 WAN-IFRA - World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers

Footer Navigation