WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Fri - 01.08.2014


circulation

U.S. publishers have come under fire in a report on the state of the newspaper industry by the German Newspaper Publishers' Association, according to the New York Times.

The study draws some parallels between the two industries, but contrasts newspapers' plunging revenues in the U.S. with the relatively healthy German press.

The NYT explains that while fewer than half of Americans read newspapers, over 70 percent of Germans do. Daily newspaper circulation in the U.S. has dropped 27 percent from 1998 to 2008, but in Germany, circulation declined 19 percent.
The report blames some of the woes of the newspapers industry in the U.S. on the structure of the industry itself. The fact that newspapers are publicly traded companies allows for pressure from shareholders for profits to force newspapers to cut into editorial and production quality, a move that has sent readers and advertisers to the Internet. In Germany; however, newspaper are owned by families or owners with local roots.

The report criticizes American newspapers for offering their content on the Internet for free. German publishers have been much more apprehensive about putting their content online. Finally, the report concludes that newspapers in Germany need not fear the same fate of American publishers because the two industries are different.

But, is this conclusion too optimistic?

Author

Maria Conde

Date

2010-05-18 17:25

The Independent may go free in London, and may merge some of its operations with the Evening Standard, the Financial Times reported. Evgeny Lebedev, son of Alexander and chairman of Independent Print, told the FT that he was considering a range of strategies to make the newspaper profitable.

The Lebedevs bought the Independent in March, having acquired London's The Evening Standard at the start of last year. The FT noted that the Independent and its Sunday partner, the Independent on Sunday, have the lowest circulation among the UK quality dailies, and Lebedev told the FT that "we will have to do something. The Independent can't stay in its present form because it will continue losing money."

The Evening Standard went free in October 2009, and Lebedev told the FT that the new model was paying off. Two free London papers closed last summer, leaving the way free for the ES. If the Independent followed suit it would be in the same area, within London's M25. Lebedev also mentioned the possibility of "finding synergies between the two papers" but said that a full merger of the papers would be unlikely.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-05-17 11:28

Martim Avillez Figuereido, the editor-in-chief of the innovative Portuguese newspaper, i, has left the direction of the daily following a number of disagreements with the management, according to Jornal de Negócios.

The Lena Group, owner of Sojormedia Capital that operates the daily, confirmed in a press release last month, that Figuereido had been let go and that the newspaper was "looking for a new direction" to guarantee the viability of the publication.
In the press release, the group affirmed it had a "new plan of action that aims to reformulate its strategy in the sector of social communication...a second measure is to search for a new direction for the newspaper that guarantees its viability. This new path will be forced to pass by cost control and revenue increase, and the deepening of synergies with other Lena Group brands."

As part of its ongoing restructuring, the company confirmed the departure of Martin Avillez Figuereido and the appointment executive director André Macedo as the new interim editor-in-chief.

Although the company commits the management to "presenting a solution for the direction of the newspaper that will assure the quality of the project and the desired restructuring simultaneously," the circumstances that surround Figuereido's departure may reveal a different future for this unique daily.

Author

Maria Conde

Date

2010-05-07 16:34

According to data from Italian newspaper circulation auditor Audipress, La Gazzetta dello Sport has reached record readership levels, with close to four million readers per day. The sports daily has been the most popular paper in Italy for some time, with a strong focus on football.

According to the paper's owner RCS MediaGroup, people choose Gazzetta because "they are looking for the news they want to read... as opposed to the news they "have to" read" and it is a paper that they generally read in their spare time. It is vastly more popular with men that with women, with 3,611,000 male readers, compared to 383,000 female.

The paper was recently revamped and has created an e-commerce venture, Gazzatown.it. A new editor, Andrea Monti, was appointed three months ago.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-05-06 17:01

There is no denying the fact that 2010 was a dicey year for many industries, not least for traditional print media. But if the latest media news from New Zealand is anything to go by, there is good reason for newspapers to keep hope, amidst cries from various directions that print is dead.

Michael Muir, publisher and president of New Zealand's Newspaper Publishers' Association stated that: "Our circulations and readerships are largely stable, advertising is picking up again and we are on the verge of exciting new media developments", leading various media commentators to make the conclusion that print is potentially on the rebound.

Muir did not deny however, that the face of traditional media is changing, and indeed will have to, if it is to safeguard its medium's survival: "Newspaper companies are effectively reinventing themselves in the digital age and are now providing a compelling, integrated experience for readers and advertisers alike."

Author

Helena Humphrey

Date

2010-04-14 13:34

While many news websites focus on improving their pageviews and unique users, Gawker Media, producer of nine popular news and gossip sites including Gawker and Jezebel, is banking on the readers that keep coming back for more.

As Gawker Media's head of advertising and marketing operations Erin Pettigrew puts it, the company hopes to strengthen its "core readership."

"This core audience -- borne of a compounding of word of mouth, search referrals, article recommendations, and successive enjoyed visits that result in regular readership -- drives our rich site cultures and premium advertising products," she said.

Pettigrew calls these page views "branded traffic," and Gawker measures its branded traffic by looking at the number of searches and page loads directly using words related to the Gawker brand. The company's loyal readers are a force to be reckoned with, amounting to 360 million visits to various Gawker Media sites in 2009 alone.

And Pettigrew believes that, based upon historical trends, this section of readers could continue to grow.

Author

Alexandra Jaffe

Date

2010-03-31 14:40

The newly reinvented French daily, France-Soir, is encountering difficulties in its attempt to reestablish itself amongst the French public, according to the New York Times. Using a "mass-market reach" the paper is attempting to "change how the French think about newspapers" with flashy headlines which the NYT's Eric Pfanner has likened to those found in tabloids.

Popular during the post-war decades, the media crisis left the daily paper suffering until just recently. The daily received its second wind after Alexander Pugachev, the 25-year-old sun of Russian billionaire Sergei Pugachev, purchased it earlier this month. The acquisition of France-Soir has lead commentators to draw comparisons between Alexander Lebedev, who recently acquired The Independent in England and already own's London's Evening Standard. During a time of economic turmoil for the media, these purchases have lead some onlookers to question the motives behind the sudden interest Russian billionaires have taken in the foreign press.

Author

Robert Eisenhart

Date

2010-03-30 10:59

Bloomberg media recently revealed a redesigned version of its recently acquired weekly publication, BusinessWeek. In adopting what MediaWeek described as a "bullish" strategy, the new version will feature more content including a "leisure/arts" section, and the number of annual issues will increase from 47 to 50.

BusinessWeek, first published in 1929, has existed for nearly 80 years but came under considerable economic strain as a result of the recent finical crisis. Bloomberg acquired the magazine in December of 2009, with the intention of using it as "a platform to extend the Bloomberg name and reach a mass audience."

The redesigned magazine will include shorter articles that allow the magazine to cover more content. Additionally, there will be a greater focus on personal storytelling and editorials similar to those found in the Economist.

Author

Robert Eisenhart

Date

2010-03-08 18:22

The Daily Telegraph, Guardian, Times and Independent all reported year-on-year circulation percentage declines in the double digits for January, Media Guardian reported today. The declines come as most have ended bulk distribution.

Last month, the Daily Telegraph's year-on-year circulation fell 11.76 percent (to 691,128), the first time it has dipped below 700,000 since the Audit Bureau of Circulations began its record in 1962. The Times saw a year-on-year circulation drop of 17.69 percent (to 508,250), the Guardian saw a year-on-year decline of 15.76 percent (to 302,285), and the Independent's year-on-year sales were down 13.78 percent (to 185,815).

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-02-15 19:21

How much would you pay for an opinion article by Paul Krugman? How much would you shell out for an article on a new RNA discovery?

As newspapers ponder the move to making readers pay for access to news content online, with many announcing that they will start to do so soon, the costs of running a newsroom and the value of news articles take center stage. With many wanting us to pay for content, we cannot help but to wonder how much that content is really worth.
Media journalist Patrick Smith asked on his blog how much an article is worth, according to journalism.co.uk. The answer, for all concerned, is very little.

Smith explains that newspaper publishers have hold on to the idea that bigger is better. Large products, with huge weekend specials, delivered to more places will give you more circulation and advertising revenue. That seemed to work before, but this model does not work today.

Author

Maria Conde

Date

2010-02-11 19:10

Syndicate content

Editors Weblog

The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


© 2013 WAN-IFRA - World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers

Footer Navigation