WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Wed - 22.10.2014


business models

1. Be more open

Traditional media used to be like a fortress, Ingram said, with people behind the walls doing things that the rest of the world couldn’t see. Now, there are so many ways now for publishers to interact with their audiences, and as Clay Shirky said, publishing is no longer an industry, it’s a button on a site.

You can do better journalism by embracing rather than ignoring these facts, Ingram said. He recommended that publishers should be thinking, “How do we help them [the audience] tell us the things that they know about the stories we are writing?”

The Guardian is doing this particularly well, he specified.

2. Give credit

“I think the most fundamental aspect of publishing online is the hyperlink,” said Ingram. Linking allows you to both give credit and support an argument at the same time, he pointed out. For him, an online article that has no links in it is “a lower form of journalism.”

Linking to other sources that you use is essential, he said. “We can’t pretend that all the things we generate inside the fortress are the only things that have value.”

“I’m often critcised for putting too many links in my blog posts,” he commented, but he continues to use as many as possible, just in case people might want them.

3. Be more human

Apologise when you make mistakes, Ingram recommended. Admitting mistakes can make readers trust you more, while ignoring mistakes will mean they will lose trust.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2013-04-26 20:28

Unlike QR codes, AR uses a phone’s camera to recognize specific images (in this case, newspaper pages) and superimposes information over the camera feed. AR technology opens related links and content within its app, whereas QR codes externally connect to links on mobile web browsers. Industry analysts agree that AR has more potential for newspapers than QR codes, which have been deemed “dead” by most.

Independent+ uses iPhone, iPad and Android app Blippar to update select print stories with new information and additional multimedia features. The newspaper is also using the app to increase audience engagement by allowing readers to vote in polls related to opinion articles. The Independent said AR supplements will be available in all sections of the newspaper, according to Press Gazette.

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-04-26 15:36

Starting at the end of this year, the Times will roll out new subscription plans at different price points. Two cheaper subscription models will be offered: One with topic-based packages, ranging from food to politics, and another that compiles the newspaper’s most important coverage.

The latter package was earlier referred to as “NYT Junior,” Jeff Bercovici of Forbes pointed out, aimed to target what Eliza Kern nicknamed “Generation Mooch.” CEO Mark Thompson said research has shown the market for this type of subscription is “hundreds of thousands,” Capital New York reported.

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-04-26 14:00

"We have to change the perception of the New York Times as not only a place to read about important stories of the day and interesting topics, but also a place to watch,” Denise Warren, executive vice president of NYT’s Digital Products and Services Group, told Journalism.co.uk.

Many of the Times’ videos were already available for free on YouTube and Hulu, an inconsistency that needed to be addressed, Warren told paidContent. And thanks to sponsorship by Acura and Microsoft, videos are now freely accessible on all of the Times’ platforms, including its mobile apps, according to a release.

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-04-24 15:19

“We are flooded with so much information that we don’t really want or need,” Michael Wheeler, founder of an “a la carte journalism” startup, said in an interview with The News Hook. “I spend a lot of time on my RSS feeds saying, ‘No, I don’t want to read that.’

“People do that in traditional media,” he added. “You open up The New York Times and thumb through 5-6 pages before you pick a story to read.”

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-04-22 12:47

“The challenge is to find out what the user really values your product for,” said Donata Hopfen, managing director of Bild Digital. Bild is planning to launch a premium online content offering this year, said Hopfen. It will be a ‘freemium’ offer, and Bild’s unique offering, the sort of news that only Bild can do, will be now be charged for, she specified.

“We were thinking very digital-first before, now we are thinking consumer-first,” said Frédérique Lancien, Digital and New Business Director at Groupe L'Equipe . “You need to think what consumers want before you build your offer,” she recommended.

At L’Équipe, the team looked at what sort of thing its customers already paid for, and tried to work out how to match these with what the paper could offer, combining its strong journalism with its massive archives. One product it came up with was e-books that offered a mass of content on an individual sportsperson, betting on the fact that sports fans want to know everything related to the sports that they love.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2013-04-17 10:18

In the past few weeks, the Vogue publisher announced video channels, investments in e-commerce and a clothing line. Yesterday, the Condé Nast College of Fashion & Design held its inaugural classes. Next year, GQ and Vogue bars will serve cocktails in Bangkok.

“We don’t consider ourselves only a magazine publisher,” Chief Integration Officer Drew Schutte told Nieman Lab in 2011.

“A year or so ago we took the word ‘publications’ off the building and took it off of our business cards,” he added. “There was this final commitment to the fact that we are a company that makes quality content ... and we’re going to put that on whatever medium it makes sense.”

This strategy seems to be working: last year the magazine industry saw an 8.2 percent decline in sales, but Condé Nast’s pre-tax profits were up 14 percent.

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-04-16 15:39

It’s not just journalism hatchlings giving this business model a try: Gawker, Forbes and Complex all tie reporters’ paychecks to web traffic, Josh Sternberg of Digiday reported.

Complex’s approach shatters the wall between advertising and editorial: Editors are paid a percentage of the company’s revenue. Their salaries also take into account their sections’ pageviews and social media action, according to Sternberg.

“You want editors understanding the business side and their pains, and vice versa,” Complex CEO Rich Antoniello told Sternberg. “We try to have everyone, not only aware, but have skin in as many games as absolutely possible. When people know the totality of the business and run in the same direction, it makes it more effective.”

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-04-11 15:44

With this trend in mind, author-specific paywalls are becoming an increasingly attractive option for news organizations.

“Many readers — particularly younger ones — consume media based not on corporate brands but on individual writers that they feel a connection to, and I would argue that is becoming the norm,” paidContent’s Mathew Ingram recently wrote. “We read the New York Times as much for Tom Friedman or Nick Kristof as we do because it is the NYT.”

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-04-09 15:29

Creator Rob Wijnberg told The Editor's Weblog he originally thought De Correspondent had a 50 percent chance of meeting its goal of 15,000 members. But as of Thursday, more than 17,000 people have shelled out €60 for an annual subscription to the news site, set to launch in September. According to the site, 48 members have additionally donated €1,000 or more to fund the project.

“We were overwhelmed, especially by how fast it was and especially by how much enthusiasm people showed for the initiative,” Wijnberg said. “People really mailed us lots of letters and tweets and everything saying that ‘I’m so glad you started this.’ We didn’t expect that.”

While this sort of drive is unusual, it is not unprecedented. Several years ago Italian newspaper Il Fatto Quotidiano similarly preemptively fundraised, and collected €5 million from 30,000 advance subscribers in 3 months.

De Correspondent has been in the works since Wijnberg quit his job as editor of Dutch national newspaper NRC Next in September. He said he noticed how people are “hounded by news” — often “struck by the same news from all different directions.”

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-04-04 17:48

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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