WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Wed - 22.10.2014


breaking news

The Tuscaloosa News won a Pulitzer prize for its breaking news coverage of a deadly tornado that swept through Alabama last April, Poynter reported. But what made the award-winning coverage so revolutionary for the journalism world was its employment of Twitter and other social media to report on the storm in real time, in addition to traditional coverage—even during power outages, the article said.

As we previously reported, Columbia University announced the 2012 Pulitzer Prize winners on Tuesday. Among the winners were online newspapers The Huffington Post and Politico.

The Pulitzer board awarded Tuscaloosa News “for its enterprising coverage of a deadly tornado, using social media as well as traditional reporting to provide real-time updates, help locate missing people and produce in-depth print accounts even after power disruption forced the paper to publish at another plant 50 miles away,” according to a press release.

Author

Gianna Walton's picture

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-18 16:48

Yesterday, Bloomberg reporters such as TV host Emily Chang and news editor Sarah Rabil tweeted that US Republican presidential candidate Rick Santorum dropped out of the running, citing The Washington Post as their source, according to The Huffington Post. As expected, the story spread like wildfire on Twitter. The problem? The Washington Post hadn’t published the story online yet—journalists were still waiting for confirmation from the Santorum campaign, the article said.

According to a Bloomberg spokesperson, Bloomberg received the news through The Washington Post’s syndication wire, the article said. Although the story was accurate, The Post was quick to deny the report on Twitter, the article said.

“Washington Post is NOT reporting that Santorum is dropping out,” a tweet from reporter Aaron Blake read. “We have NOT reported this, despite tweets to the contrary.”

Author

Gianna Walton's picture

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-11 17:53

The trial of American student Amanda Knox has been the on-and-off focus of global media attention since 2007, when the murder of British student Meredith Kercher took place in the Italian city of Perugia. This latest trial is an appeal against a verdict given in 2009 that sentenced Knox to 26 years in jail for her alleged role in Kercher's murder. Knox's then boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, was also implicated in the crime and sentenced to 25 years.

Yesterday, the appeal verdict was delivered: not guilty. After four years in jail for Kercher's murder, Knox was released.

Naturally, the media were ready for the announcement. It's an old game, reporting the verdict of a big case. Gone are the days when newspapers would print two copies of their front page - one anticipating a guilty verdict and one in case the defendant were found not guilty - but the guessing, the preparation and the anticipation still remains. Now, in the age of instantaneous digital mobile news, the challenge is to be the news organisaion to break the story first - oh yes, and to be the one that publishes the correct information.


Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-10-04 14:39

Not surprisingly, the news of the death of Osama Bin Laden monopolized the news yesterday.

Here are some of the most interesting articles analyzing the way the event was covered by media.

Nieman Lab noted that, despite the fact that New York Times publisher Arthur Sulzberger, Jr. announced at the time of the implementing of the paid online content strategy that a gate for breaking-news stories that were, essentially, must-reads, would be opened, for Bin Laden's death this didn't happen. All the articles and blog posts remained behind the paywall.

While it was noted that Internet led the information tide, newspapers played their role as well, increasing their press runs in response to interest among readers, as News & Tech reported. The New York Times printed 165,000 extra copies, 125,000 of which were for distribution in the New York market, more than twice the usual order. The Washington Post said it produced an additional 35,000 copies.

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-05-03 17:46

US President Obama has given a statement confirming the death of al-Qaeda leader Osama Bin Laden, killed by US Special Forces in Abbottabad, Pakistan, as the BBC News reported (you can find the video here).

The way that the news of such a dramatic, sudden development spread around the world provides an interesting impression of today's news landscape.

Unsurprisingly, before Obama's official announcement on TV, the news had already hit Twitter.

As Tech Crunch reported, the first credible feedback came from Keith Urbahn, the Chief of Staff for former Defence Secretary Donald Rumsfeld, who tweeted "I'm told by a reputable person they have killed Osama Bin Laden." CBS news producer Jill Scott then reiterated the rumour and Urbahn and Scott's tweets were re-tweeted hundreds of times.

As Twitter declared, its traffic reached more than 4,000 tweets per second at the beginning and end of President Obama's speech.

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-05-02 15:56

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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