WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Fri - 24.10.2014


blogging

Excellent news for "smaller" blogging sites with a turnover of less than £2 million per annum and/or fewer than 10 employees, then, as it has been announced that such businesses will not be subject to the harsh financial damages due to be introduced under the new royal charter (see previous Editors Weblog article on reactions to the royal charter). Small companies who do not consider publishing news as the main part of their business will also be exempt.

Many of the small blogging sites in question will be heaving a huge sigh of relief in the wake of this government concession. Concerns had already been raised over the issue; outrage was widespread over the fact that small-scale bloggers would be subject to the harsh press regulation rules that were intended for the large news organisations responsible for the misconduct which lead to the Leveson inquiry in the first place. This exemption has been made in the form of a legislative amendment to the royal charter agreed upon by the Conservative, Liberal Democrat and Labour parties. The amendment is due to go before the House of Commons for debate later today, 22April.

Author

Emily Moore

Date

2013-04-22 16:22

It is ironic that a political pundit famed for innovative statistical rigour should be decried bitterly in some quarters as a partisan propagandist. Such, however, is the fate of Nate Silver, voguish election specialist and author of The New York Times blog ‘FiveThirtyEight’. As the two US presidential hopefuls turn into the electoral Tattenham corner ready for next week’s home straight, one might be forgiven for assuming the race is far from run; Obama might lead by a length, so the media consensus runs, but a late surge of momentum from Mitt Romney means that all bets are off.

Author

Frederick Alliott's picture

Frederick Alliott

Date

2012-11-02 18:47

When Washington Post blogger Elizabeth Flock resigned from her position after making her second aggregation error in four months on blogPost, the Post’s breaking news blog, ombudsman Patrick Pexton wrote an opinion piece asserting that the paper had failed Flock as a young journalist; soon after Pexton’s column was published, a wave of criticism and concerns about the dangers of blogging surfaced, Poynter reported.  

According to Pexton’s article, Flock was often the only reporter writing for blogPost, writing an average of 5.9 posts per day on a wide array of topics. The blog was meant to achieve 1-2 million views per month, the article said.

Flock’s first error, which earned her a strongly-worded editor’s note criticizing her actions, was in reporting a viral but false story that Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney had used a slogan favored by the Ku Klux Klan in one of his speeches—without calling the campaign to confirm before publishing, the article said.

Author

Gianna Walton's picture

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-24 17:27

Yesterday, Twitter announced its acquisition of blogging platform Posterous Spaces, a move which could have interesting consequences for online sharing.

“Today we are welcoming a very talented group from Posterous to Twitter,” stated a Twitter news blog post. “This team has built an innovative product that makes sharing across the web and mobile devices simple—a goal we share.”

Posterous, which allows users to upload blog posts, photos or videos by sending an email, simplifies online sharing and cross-blogging for the tech-averse, as previously reported by Poynter. Co-founded by CEO Sachin Agarwal and Garry Tan in 2008, Posterous also allows users to post on-the-go via mobile phones, which can help bloggers share news-worthy information faster than a traditional blogging platform.

In a blog post, the Posterous team expressed its approval of the acquisition, citing the two companies’ common interests in simplifying the sharing process for users.

Author

Gianna Walton's picture

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-03-13 14:03

What's the difference between a journalist and a blogger?

Once upon a time, this might have just been a subject to get people riled up on Twitter. Yet now it has also become a more serious legal question in the wake of the conviction of blogger Crystal Cox for defamation.

Cox, who blogs about law, industry, finance and corruption was convicted for defaming the investment firm Obsidian Finance Group in this post. Cox accuses the firm's co-founder Kevin Padrick or being a "a Thug, Thief and a Liar" and writes that he is guilty of bankruptcy fraud.

The case took place in Portland, Oregon, where the U.S. District Judge Marco A. Hernandez ruled against Cox and awarded $2.5 million to Obsidian Finance Group.

The controversial element was not so much that Cox lost her case as the judge's reasoning behind his decision. Cox argued that the basis for her post was an anonymous whistleblower, and maintained that she was unable to prove the factual basis of her writing without revealing her source.

Oregon state has a media shield law, protecting journalists from being forced by the judiciary to divulge their sources. Yet, controversially, the judge ruled:

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2011-12-09 11:27

Italian prime minister Silvio Berlusconi's controversial wiretapping bill continues to spark further protests from Italy's online community.

As reported earlier, the bill known as DDL Intercettazioni was initially designed to prevent newspapers publishing information obtained through wiretapped recordings, such recordings having caused significant trouble for the Italian PM after it was discovered he called Italy 'a shit country' and made crass insults about the German Chancellor Angela Merkel.

The most contentious clause of the bill, paragraph 29, also proposed that should any blogger publish information deemed to be defamatory, the blogger would be forced to print a correction within 48 hours of publishing the offending entry else pay a fine of €12,000.

Unsurprisingly, the proposed legislation has caused outcry from the press and the blogging community, with demonstrations in Rome and journalists striking in protest.

Wikipedia has also joined the fight.

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-10-06 14:15

The renowned American publication TIME Magazine has decided to launch not one, but two Tumblr blogs. In a staff memo published on Poynter, Jim Frederick, the magazine's managing editor, explains why TIME Tumblrs are a great idea.

The magazine has chosen to use Tumblr, which is now a more popular blogging site than Wordpress due to its social features, to launch a reduced version of its photoblog, LightBox, and to create a digital archive of TIME Magazine.

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-09-07 13:08

Bloggers are the free agents of journalism. Less constrained than any free-lance writer, they have the ability to write exactly what they choose; a blogger is at liberty to be the voice of dissent, to argue for the underrepresented or oppressed and, in short, say what nobody else is going to say.

These privileges arise from uncensored publishing. Although the strength of the blog lies in fact that it can represent an individual voice, how can we know how information is gathered and whether the writer(s) of the blog is employing ethical and honest practices in writing? Is it possible, is it right, to unite the blogoshpere under a code of ethical practice?

Cyber journalist has attempted to do just that, basing their suggestions of the Society of Professional Journalists' Code of Ethics. Evidently, the current News of the World debacle has raised questions about standards of good practice within journalism. With David Cameron and Nick Clegg denoucing the U.K. Press Complaints Commission and calleing for the rules of regulation to be re-written, everyone is asking the question: how do we regulate the press and should bloggers be included?

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-07-13 13:44

Luca Conti, Italian, founder and director of the blog Pandemia and technology and media expert, is leaving today as the first Italian blogger embedded with the NATO troops in Afghanistan.

The project pertains to the NATO press tours: journalists and bloggers from the countries which have troops based in Afghanistan are invited to a tour around the country. The aim - Conti reported on his blog - is to show the press the reconstruction process, under the aegis of NATO, within the country so that they can inform the public opinion about the improvements in terms of security and governance the Afghan civil society is making. Journalists will visit the NATO's Provincial Reconstruction Team.

Conti is leaving today for Kabul from Brussels, where he visited the NATO's general headquarters and spoke with the US Ambassador to NATO, Ivo H. Daalder, for a first briefing on the general working of the international organization and on the transition situation Afghanistan is currently facing, which will lead to the definitive withdrawal of the allied troops on 2014.

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-06-24 16:25

Since its advent, the Internet has blurred the lines between copyrighted and free content. Publishers are frustrated with the seeming inability to keep material under control, and commentators are increasingly careful about sourcing material in order to stay on the right side of copyright and plagiarism cases.

One such case earlier this week ruled that reposting an article in its entirety, even without the owner's authority, was fair use of the work. In this particular instance, Righthaven, a company specializing in copyright litigation, sued Wayne Hoehn, a user of the site medjacksports.com, for posting an article to prompt discussion. Righthaven argued that posting the article reduced the number of hits the Review-Journal site would have received.

After citing the fair use clause as he ruled in favor of Hoehn, the judge explained that he found the posting to be for non-commercial purposes. He added that Righthaven did not have enough of a stake in the dispute to entitle it to bring the case to court.

Author

Florence Pichon

Date

2011-06-22 14:10

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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